(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Abbot Bulletin"


TJSs&awESKj, 4 ivm 



\ W^Ww 





"P** '•F WI '^W| 



Abbot Academy Bulletin 

October 1953 



ABBOT ACADEMY BULLETIN 



Series 21 



OCTOBER, 1953 



Issue i 



Abbot Academy Alumnae Association 

Associate Member of the American Alumni Council 



President 
Miss Irene Atwood 
180 Commonwealth Ave. 
Boston 16, Mass. 

Vice-presidents 
Mrs. Edmund W. Nutting 

(Mary Howard) 

21 Wave Ave. 

Wakefield, Mass. 
Mrs. Lenert W. Henry 

(Helen Allen) 

25 Irving Street 

Hingham, Mass. 
Mrs. A. Lawrence Van Wart 

(Betty Weaver) 

160 Melrose Place 

Ridgewood, N. J. 



OFFICERS— 1952-1954 

Clerk 
Mrs. Theodore Atkinson 
(Jane Holt) 
8 Chestnut Street 
Winchester, Mass. 

Treasurer 
Mrs. Ernest L. Wilkinson 
(Helen Knight) 
Alden Road 
Andover, Mass. 

General Secretary 
Miss C. Jane Sullivan 
97 Knox Street 
Lawrence, Mass. 



Alumnae Trustees 
1948-1954 
Miss Tane Baldwin 
140 East 28th Street 
New York, New York 

1951-1957 

Mrs. H. Guyford Stevkr 
(Louise Risley) 
36 Fairmont Street 
Belmont, Mass. 



ABBOT CLUB PRESIDENTS 



BOSTON 

Mrs. Robert H. Marsh 
(Dorothy Beeley) 
32 Williams Road 
Lexington 73, Mass. 

CHICAGO 

Mrs. Floyd Shumway 

(Margaret Rabling) 

815 East Deerpath 

Lake Forest, Illinois 

CONNECTICUT 
Mrs. Donald Hoggson 
(Gertrude Drummond) 
R.F.D. 
Lakeville, Conn. 

DETROIT 

Mrs. Howard H. Fitzgerald 
(Jean Craig) 
19091 Bedford Road 
Birmingham, Michigan 



MAINE, EASTERN 
Mrs. Richard Roberts 
(Dorothy Spear) 
26 Forest Avenue 
Bangor, Maine 



MAINE, WESTERN 

Mrs. Frank N. Wells 
(Louise Houghton) 
32 Ship Channel Road 
South Portland, Maine 

NEW YORK 

Honorary President 
Miss Jane Baldwin 

OHIO, CENTRAL 
Mrs. John B. Gager 
(Thelma Mazey) 
228 N. Drexel Avenue 
Columbus 9, Ohio 



OHIO, CLEVELAND 
Mrs. Edward F. Little 
(Nancy Baylor) 
1407 Commonwealth Avenue 
Mayfield Heights 
Cleveland 24, Ohio 

OLD COLONY 

Mrs. Oscar M. Finger 
(Martha Wind) 
8 Belcher Avenue 
Brockton, Mass. 

PITTSBURGH 

Mrs. William R. Maier 
(Jean Cross) 
Box 86, RD11 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 



THE EDITORIAL BOARD 

Jane B. Carpenter, 1892, honorary 
Constance Parker Chipman, 1906, honorary 
C.Jane Sullivan, 1931, Editor-in-Chief 
Irene Atwood, 191 8, ex officio 



Published four times yearly, October, February, May, and September, by Abbot Acad- 
emy, Andover, Massachusetts. 

Entered as second class matter December 12, 1933, at the post office at Andover, Massa- 
chusetts, under the act of August 24, 191 2. 



Ma 



Fall Calendar 



September 22 — Arrival and registration of new resident students 

September 23 — Arrival and registration of re-entering resident students 

September 26 — Picnic at Ipswich Beach 
Old girl-new girl party 

September 2"/ — Vespers — Miss Hearsey 

October 3 — Senior Picnic 

"An Evening of Oriental Magic" — Bernard Whitman 

October 4 — Vespers — The Reverend Raymond Calkins, D.D., Pastor 
Emeritus, First Church in Cambridge 

October 10 — "Across America Afoot" — William Stockdale and Taj Ma- 
hal 

October 11 — Vespers — The Reverend Hans Sidon, Ph.D., Christ Presby- 
terian Church, Lawrence 

October ij — Ballad Singer, Earle Spicer 

October 18 — Vespers — The Reverend Wilfred Bunker, Congregational 
Church, Durham, N. H. 

October 24 — United Nations Program 

October 31 — Hallowe'en Party 

November 1 — Boston Symphony Concert in Boston 

Vespers — The Reverend Allen W. Clark, Calvary Church, 
Danvers 

November 7 — Andover-Exeter Game at Exeter 

November 8 — Vespers — The Reverend Palfrey Perkins, D.D., King's 
Chapel, Boston 

November 13 — Lecture on Russia — Frank Wendell Rounds 

November 14 — Movie 

November 15 — Boston Symphony Concert 
Student Recital 

November 21 — "Adventure was my Password" — James Coletta 

November 22 — Northfield Vespers 

November 25 — Thanksgiving Service 

November 28 — Piano Recital by Miss Friskin 

November 2g — Vespers — The Reverend A. Graham Baldwin, D.D., Chap- 
lain at Phillips Academy 

December 5 — Senior Play 

December 12 — Christmas Reading by Miss Hale 

December 13 — Vespers — Christmas Service — Miss Hearsey 

December 15 — School closes for Christmas vacation 




Fall Field Day 





Qn&etUt&l 



I AM sure that many old girls have found their thoughts turning to Abbot 
as the school year began. Some are starting their college career and al- 
though excited and happy, they were perhaps a bit overwhelmed with the 
new large world in which they were comparatively an unimportant little 
Freshman after their intimate life of Abbot which they left last spring as the 
most important members of the school. Many are sending their children off 
to school for the first time, with a rather wistful feeling that the "baby" is no 
longer a baby, and some of you may have been thinking that the time will 
come, perhaps all too soon, when your daughter will be old enough to go to 
Abbot and have been imagining what it would be like to have a daughter 
here. (Incidentally, twenty-four of the new girls this year are relatives of 
former Abbot girls, if not actually daughters !) 

Let me assure you that when school opened on September twenty- 
second, the scene was just as you remember it. The shy, the confident, the 
eager young things coming for the first time were just as full of interest for 
the faculty and for the old girls as ever. I always see them as somewhat 
mysterious packages, neatly tied up with ribbon, concealing all sorts of 
possibilities still to be discovered. The old girls looking very self-assured and 
savoir-faire-ish, throw off their dignity as they greet their friends with the 
usual shrieks of delight and excited chatter. 

Yes, you remember all that. Not much change in their ways in fifty or 
sixty years! (Nor probably, in one hundred and twenty-five.) You remember, 
too, I am sure, the beauty of the grounds with the autumn color of the maple 
walk, the exhilaration of hockey and basketball practice; and, more soberly, 
the peace and inspiration of Chapel and Vesper Services in Abbot Hall, and 
the excitement of new revelations in laboratory and class rooms or the libra- 
ry. "Ah, life was good, then," you sigh, "I didn't appreciate it half enough." 

But, even though you didn't work as hard as you know you should have, 
or listen as carefully as you wish you had to the speakers or the music, or 
didn't use your free time as profitably as you might, I imagine you realize 
now that more happened to you than you were aware of at the time, and the 
"residue" is of incalculable value. When we adults are prompted at times 
to wish the young could appreciate their opportunities more fully, I find my- 
self comforted in the thought of all the old girls who have told me what their 
memories of their Abbot days mean to them. Even though they were "prob- 



lems" to their teachers (and often these are the girls who later seem to be 
most articulate in their appreciation), something of value was happening 
to them in these school years, the full significance of which is recognized by 
them and by their teachers, too, only through the perspective of time. 

Here, in this new session, during which we shall celebrate the one 
hundred and twenty-fifth anniversary of the founding of the school, we have 
opened with as large a number of students as we can accommodate. The 
seniors have assumed their new position of honor with great seriousness and 
are helping break in new girls with a sense of great responsibility and friend- 
liness. But their ability to laugh, to enjoy the immediate moment, to throw 
themselves with all their powers into the winning of a hockey game, or the 
rehearsal of a play, or even the preparation to receive a "date," as well as the 
preparation for college, is refreshing to observe and live with. 

One way in which you may all share in this revitalizing atmosphere is to 
plan to return for the celebration of our one hundred and twenty-fifth birth- 
day next spring. Unfortunately we cannot provide accommodations for 
sleeping, but we want you to be as much a part of the school life as possible 
for the week end of May 7-9. Elsewhere in the Bulletin you will find a tenta- 
tive program of events. The emphasis is to be on the "old girls." We want the 
occasion to be a real home-coming, and we want everyone who possibly can 
to come back. There will be no Alumnae meeting or reunions at Commence- 
ment this year. Instead, during the Birthday Week End the annual business 
meeting of the Alumnae Association will be held and there will be oppor- 
tunity for group reunions by classes that were in school together. Andover 
and our own grounds will be very beautiful at that time of year and of course 
we shall hope for our usual good luck with the weather ! 

Begin now to plan for the spring trip. Get in touch with your old Abbot 
friends — those girls you liked so much but haven't seen for years, and arrange 
to meet here again and renew old ties. You will find a warm welcome and our 
best hospitality awaiting you, and an experience that will be rejuvenating and 
inspiring. You will find that Abbot is still yours and why it is. 



^-^Cx^^L^tsi^ f L- r7^cua $£+. 



Abbot's 125th Birthday 

An invitation is extended to all Alumnae by the Trustees of Abbot and 
Miss Hearsey to attend the celebration of the school's 125th Birthday which 
will occur on May 7-9, 1954. This is truly a milestone in Abbot's history and 
we are honored to be invited to participate in its observance. 

Let's each mark these dates on our calendars and plan to come back to 
Abbot next May. 

An outline of the tentative program follows: 

May 7 6:00 p.m. Dinner at Abbot 
7:30 p.m. Recital or Play 

May 8 1 1 :oo a.m. Alumnae Association Annual Meeting 

1 :oo p.m. Class Reunion Luncheons (at nearby restaurants or 

inns) 
2:30 p.m. Bazaar 
6:30 p.m. Banquet at Abbot (speaker to be announced later) 

May 9 9:00 a.m. Breakfast at Abbot 

10:00 a.m. Service in the Chanel 

An exhibition of the paintings, drawings and creative works of Abbot 
alumnae will be shown in the John Esther Art Gallery. Details will be 
announced later, but start now to select your masterpiece ! 

More definite information will be forthcoming at a later date, but it is 
not too early to make our plans for a wonderful Birthday Party. 

Irene Atwood 
President of Alumnae Association 



Betsy Aldrich '52 — Secretary of College Government at Wheaton 

Jeanne Cowles Wilson '40 — Author oi Half Pint, a book for children from 7-9 

Hester Dignan '47 — Recipient of scholarship from trustees of Boston 
Museum of Art for two years study abroad 

Mary Lois Pendleton '49 — B.A. degree in Architectural Sciences cum laude 
from Radcliffe 

Johanna West '49 — Treasurer of Student Government at Wheelock College 

5 



Faculty Facts 




Miss Hope Baynes retired this summer having 
completed thirty years as Financial Secretary of the 
school. Miss Baynes was appointed by Miss Bailey, 
in 1923, coming to Abbot from the Bank of Montreal 
where she had received her excellent training as 
bookkeeper. 

/-*****" Abbot will seem very different to those on the 

j A k faculty who are "old-timers" without Hope Baynes, 

gg » „_ anc l man y 5 man y \ c \ girls will miss her cordial wel- 

Bk^,.. J| come when they return for visits. 

It is difficult to estimate adequately the loyal 
service Miss Baynes rendered the school. She managed the books with great 
efficiency, and for many years the school bank and the school book store, also. 
Her willingness at all times to answer innumerable questions and her vital 
interest not only in the life of Abbot, but, also, in the affairs of the world has 
added much spice to the life of her associates. Our warmest gratitude and 
good wishes go with her as she looks forward to her well earned leisure. Al- 
though we shall miss both Hope and Hilda Baynes greatly, we are happy to 
know that they are comfortably and contentedly settled in an apartment in 
St. Petersburg, and they want to assure any Abbot friends of a warm welcome 
whenever they may be in their vicinity. For their address see page 26. 



It is with great regret that we have accepted this 
fall the resignation of Miss Mary Gay as a member of 
our faculty. For twenty years Miss Gay has taught 
History of Art and Appreciation of Art at Abbot. All 
who have had the privilege of studying with Miss 
Gay and knowing her realize what a rare privilege 
it was. Her inexhaustible fund of knowledge, her 
gift as a teacher and as an artist, and her contagious 
enthusiasm and virtuosity have enriched and delighted 
generations of students. Though she has passed four 
score years, Miss Gay is still young and vigorous in 
body and "mind and spirit, and it is only for family reasons that she felt she 
must resign. Her friends are deeply grateful for all she gave us and wish her 
happiness and continued health. 



New Faculty. Miss Ann Horner, who is a graduate of Vassar, and has an 
M.A. degree from Radcliffe, will teach English. She comes to Abbot from the 
Kent School in Denver, Colo. 




Miss Jean Johnson will also teach English. She is a graduate of the 
University of Wisconsin, and holds an M.A. degree from the University of 
Hawaii. She has taught in Hawaii. 

Miss Elizabeth Pratt will divide her time between the History depart- 
ment and administrative duties. She is a graduate of Smith College, and 
holds an M.A. degree in the field of History from Columbia University. She 
has recently taught at St. Timothy's School in Baltimore and St. Margaret's 
School in Waterbury. 

Mrs. Rita Ashworth, Miss Alice Blake, and Miss Edith Massey are new 
members of the financial and secretarial staffs. 

Present Faculty. Miss Jennings of the History department attended the 
University of Edinburgh this summer and took a course in the History of 
Western Civilization. Miss Wulff took courses in American History and 
American Literature at the University of Colorado. 



Club News 



Boston 

The fall meeting was held October 21, at the Junior League in Boston. 
Rev. Russell T. Loesch, Polly Francis Loesch's husband, showed slides of a 
trip to the Southwest. 

Chicago 

A meeting was held June 28 at Peg Rabling Shumway's home in Lake 
Forest. Edith Bullen Creden's husband showed movies of a cruise he had 
taken with the Navy as part of its public relations program. The movies were 
taken on the USS Iowa in the Pacific. 

A luncheon meeting in the Loop is being planned for the fall. 

Connecticut 

A luncheon meeting was held October 9, at the Stone Terrace, Salis- 
bury. Miss Hearsey and Miss Sullivan attended and showed views of Abbot. 

Eastern Maine 

The annual luncheon and business meeting was held July 1 4, in Damaris- 
cotta. 

Old Colony 

The annual meeting will be held at Snow Lodge in Bridgewater, Mass., 
October 3 1 . The business meeting will be held at the home of Martha Wind 
Finger '33, in Brockton. Miss Hearsey and Miss Sullivan will show views of 
the school. 



New Alumnae Relatives 



Elizabeth Baldwin — sister of Barbara Baldwin Potter, 1950 

Elizabeth Beal — daughter of Henrietta Thompson Beal, 1921; niece of Elizabeth Thompson 
Winslow, 1 92 1 

Barbara Ann Bradley — cousin of Mary Dooley Bragg, 1936 and Ann Dooley, 1938 

Marlena Comas — cousin of Anisia Allen, 1952 

Mary Earhart — granddaughter of Carrie Louise Beal Earhart, Aff. 1891 ; sister of Patricia 
Earhart, 1953; cousin of Ann Kennedy, 1953 

Ellen Edmonds — sister of Elizabeth Edmonds, 1956 

Carolyn Gaines — sister of Julie Gaines, 1953 

Sally Graf — daughter of Mary Eaton Graf, 1929 

Anne Gramkow — daughter of Margaret Nay Gramkow, 1927; sister of Beverly Gramkow, 

!954 
Bridget Hayes — cousin of Anne Wadleigh, 1 949 

Deborah Holbrook — niece of Cynthia Holbrook Sumner, 1937; cousin of Augusta Swazey 
Gardner, Aff. 1884 

Mary Ann Holden — sister of Paula Holden, 1951 

Jane Kent — granddaughter of Adelaide Gale Kent, Aff. 1884 

Susan McGuire — daughter of Helen Connolly McGuire, 1927; niece of Ruth Connolly Burke, 
!925 

Marjorie Moore — granddaughter of Martha Hart Moore, 1889; niece of Barbara Moore 
Pease, 191 2 

Margaret Oliver — sister of Anne Oliver, 1953 

Leslia (Lee) Pelton — cousin of Sophronia Vibberts Conlin, 1937 

Jean Reynolds — sister of Clara Reynolds Palmer, 1952 

Nancy Ruhlin — cousin of Elizabeth Sjdstrdm Thomson, 191 9 

Elizabeth Sommer — sister of Shirley Sommer Holzwarth, 1945; cousin of Marjorie Sommer 
Tucker, 1946, Luella Mae Sommer Vermeil, 1941, Dorothy Erkert Simon, 1942, and 
Mary Elizabeth Erkert Altorfer, 1941 

Carol Straton — cousin of Marion B. Sanford, 1910, and Helen Taylor, 1948 

Gail Titcomb — niece of Agnes Titcomb Henderson, 1 92 1 

Anne Woolverton — cousin of Jane Woolverton, 1941 

Frances Young — sister of Genevieve Young, 1948, and Shirley Young, 1951 



NEW ALUMNAE RELATIVES PICTURED ON COVER 

Left to right — Barbara Bradley, Ellen Edmonds, Sally Graf, Mary Ann Holden, Jane Kent, 
Anne Woolverton, Susan McGuire, Gail Titcomb, Nancy Ruhlin, Jean Reynolds, Frances 
Young, Carolyn Gaines, Margaret Oliver, Leslia Pelton, Deborah Holbrook, Marjorie 
Moore, Elizabeth Baldwin, Elizabeth Sommer, Marlena Comas, Mary Earhart, Carol Straton, 
Anne Gramkow, Elizabeth Beal, Bridget Hayes. 

8 



Report of Graduates of 1953 





FOUR-YEAR COLLEGES 




Bryn Mawr 


Natalie Stan- 


Skidmore 


Judith Pinkham 


Connecticut 


Mary Goodnow 


Smith 


Janet Bowden 




Martha Gross 




Mary Grant 




Helen Marvell 




Carol Hardin 




Ellen Smith 




Polly Jackson 




Ann Stoddard 




Anne Oliver 
Doris Schoonmaker 


Cornell 


Elizabeth Hollister 










Sweet Briar 


Beatrice Hekma 


Hollins 


Letitia Miller 








Dunster Pettit 


University of Colorado 


Nancy Smedley 


Hood 


Jane Wilson 


University of Michigan 


Patricia Earhart 


Mount Holyoke 


Nancy Edmonds 


University of New Mexico Beverly Berkey 




Mary Owl 


University of Vermont 


Mary Williams 




Audrey Taylor 










Vassar 


Nancy Bailey 


Newton College of the 






Caroline Benedict 


Sacred Heart 


Cornelia Weldon 




Deborah Bethell 


Northwestern 


Carol Burton 




Ann Clark 




Ann Kennedy 




Cornelia Nyce 




Martha Schneider 


Wellesley 


Elaine Audi 


Peace 


Ruth Sidon 




Pamela Bushnell 
Patricia Eveleth 


Pembroke 


Judith Wilcox 




Barbara Schroedel 


Radcliffe 


Diana Stevenson 




Sally Swayne 


Simmons 


Mary Scandura 


Wheaton 


Helen Glidden 




Eva Stern 




Elizabeth Hitzrot 




TWO-YEAR 


COLLEGES 




Bennett Junior 


Julie Gaines 


Colby Junior 


Martha Horsefield 




Ann Zuill 


Pine Manor 


Maryse Besso 


Bradford Junior 


Dorothy Giles 
Catalina Gomez 







SCHOOLS OF SPECIALIZED TRAINING 

Wheelock Suzanne Martin 

TRAVEL 

Antonia Gerald 



The gift of the class of 1953 was $486 to be used to start 
a fund for a Gymnasium. 



Reunion Reports 




i8 9 8 

Back row, left to right — Selina Cook Dunbar, Ethel Perky Tyler, Annie Smart Angus 
Front row, left to right — Florence M. Pease, Harriet C. Lord, Nellie Flint Rand, Amy Stork 
Kydd 



The Fifty-fifth Reunion of 1898 

When you say you graduated from Abbot 
fifty-five years ago people seem to think you 
are ready for the discard! The 'g8ers who 
returned for Alumnae Day did not feel that 
way about it. Seven of us were on hand for 
the meeting and the luncheon. We had a 
good visit together and were able to bring 
ourselves up to date on one another's doings. 
Our one regret was that illness and distance 
kept some of the others away. 

Of special interest to us were Lina Cook 
Dunbar's account of her flights across this 
country and Europe (if you want to keep 
young take a tip from Lina) and hearing by 
letter from Anne Gilchrist Strong who lives 
in New Zealand. She is now retired, of 
course, enjoying life in her adopted country 
but when she was teaching she did such out- 
standing work, both in India and New Zea- 
land, she was honored with a decoration 
from the British Government. 

The rest of us seem to have done more or 



less the usual things and we hope to keep on 
doing them, at least until our 60th! 

Our gift to the Alumnae Fund was appro- 
priately $55. 

Annie Smart Angus 
Reunion Chairman 

The Forty-fifth Reunion of 1908 

1908's reunion made up in gaiety what 
it lacked in numbers. Five loyal members, 
Esther Parker Lovett, Esther Stickney Alley, 
Thirza Gay Hunt, Katherine Raymond And- 
rews, and yours truly, Dorothy Taylor, 
lunched together, and then retired to a 
corner of the library to read letters from 
some of the absent ones, and to all talk at 
once. Mary Howell is to be our new class 
fund secretary. I am very happy to have 
someone else experience what I have found 
to be the pleasures and privileges of that 
office. 

Dorothy Taylor 
Reunion Chairman 



IO 




igo8 
Left to right — Thirza Gay Hunt, Esther Stickney Alley, Esther Parker Lovett, Dorothy Taylor, 
Katharine Raymond Andrews 




1918 
Left to right — Mariette Goodrich Page, Irene Atwood, Louise Bacon Fuller, Marion McPher- 
son. Not an official reunion. 



II 



The Thirtieth Reunion of* 192B 

Our thirtieth reunion was a splendid suc- 
cess! Although it was a busy holiday week 
end, eleven members of our class attended. 
It was a thoroughly delightful occasion. 

I'm sorry all of you could not have been 
there to share in the fun! However, we're 
hoping that you can all attend the 125th 
Birthday of Abbot, which is going to be 
celebrated on May 8, 1954. With all the 
Abbot alumnae coming back to Andover for 
Abbot Alumnae Week End, it will be so 
festive to meet not only our own former 
classmates but friends from other classes as 
well. Do save the second week end in May 
for a gala get-together! 

Through the graciousness of Mr. and Mrs. 
Flagg, Libby's parents, we again had the 
use of Baronial Hall as our class head- 
quarters. It was most convenient to the 
campus, where we all met and attended the 
Alumnae Meeting together. Many had 
traveled long distances. Esther Wood Peirce 
came all the way from Montreal! It was so 
good to see everyone, and, if we do say so, 
everyone not only felt but looked very well 
preserved after thirty years! We were very 



proud to report, at the alumnae meeting, 
that our class gift to the Alumnae Fund was 
one hundred and forty-two dollars, con- 
tributed by twenty-four loyal members of 
our class. This was achieved through the 
wonderful work of Ruthie Holmes Durant, 
who worked untiringly, writing those per- 
sonal notes to which you all responded so 
wonderfully. 

After the alumnae meeting, we all at- 
tended the Alumnae Luncheon in the 
Bailey Dining Room at the school. We were 
delighted to have two mothers with us, 
Esther Wood Peirce's and Mimi Thompson 
Kimball's, who were most delightful lunch- 
eon companions. Late in the afternoon we 
all assembled in Baronial Hall, this time 
being joined by several husbands, for a gay 
cocktail party, with Libby as gracious 
hostess. Following this we all went on to 
Andover Inn, where we enjoyed a delicious 
dinner, after which members either attended 
Draper Dramatics or returned to Libby's. 
Everyone was most enthusiastic about our 
successful reunion! 

Miriam Sweeney McArdle 

Reunion Chairman 




1923 
Back row, left to right — Elizabeth Flagg Dow, Charlotte Hudson White, Esther Wood Peirce, 

Miriam Thompson Kimball 
Front row, left to right — Miriam Sweeney McArdle, Martha Buttrick Rogers, Francelia Holmes, 

Emily Holt Mucklow 



12 



The Twenty-fifth Reunion of 1928 

Somebody dragged out our Class Book, 
found I had been secretary — so here goes. 

The class of 1928 gathered for the Alum- 
nae Meeting, on Saturday, May 30th, in 
Abbot Hall and were serenaded by the 
Senior class. At lunch we counted noses and 
found ourselves eight strong and two hus- 
bands (left at Sue Ripley's). See picture. 

After a delicious lunch we posed around 
the table for our photograph. I expect it will 
be as frightful as all the others. We have to be 
seen in the flesh to realize how well preserved 
we are for our advanced years! 

It was then decided to go to Sue's house 
and get down to the business of catching up 
twenty-five years. Sue's husband took 
Sloper's husband in tow, so the girls were 
free to let down their hair. The following 
were recorded from around the dining-room 
table: 

Bunny Bliss Billings — Two children, John, 
fifteen, and Linda, twelve, who are com- 
pletely adolescent! Lawyer husband and the 
usual civic activities. Bunny said she called 
Leach's name loudly on her way through 
Providence — no answer. 

GeeGee Gay d'Elseaux — Graduated from 
M. G. H. in 1 93 1 (Massachusetts General 
Hospital in case you don't get it). Married 
for twenty-one years. Three daughters aged 
16, 15, and 13. Husband is a psychoanalyst. 
Usual civic activities. 

Liz Hollis Sutton — A doctor husband. 
Three children, Elizabeth, thirteen, Patricia, 
seven, and son, fifteen — first year at Andover. 
Bea Lane Mercer — Has four children. 
Three girls, 20, 18 and 10, and a son, 15. 
Eldest girl graduated from Abbot two years 
ago. Has a large assortment of animals in- 
cluding two horses which she transports by 
trailer to their winter home in Sarasota, 
Florida, every year. Husband is an op- 
tometrist. 

Nivy JVivison Chase — My husband is a 
bank cashier in Little Falls, N. Y. We have 
two boys, 9 and 1 1 years of age. Still singing 
in the choir and playing a cello in an or- 
chestra, P.T.A., and the usual civic activities. 
Pipe Piper Sears — Still live in Sudbury. 
Two children, Eddie 15, and Leslie, n. 
Husband is an investment banker. To keep 
up with the rest I have the usual civic activi- 
ties plus a good deal of time spent in amateur 
theatricals. 

Sue Ripley Ward — Graduated from Sarah 



Lawrence College and then to Carleton 
College in Minnesota for two years. Became 
engaged to a Scotsman — engagement broken 
so taught music in Philadelphia, Providence, 
and Cambridge. Came the war and I made 
condensers. Went in hard for music again 
and became a professional musician in San 
Antonio, Texas, in 1943, playing the viola 
in their symphony orchestra. Took a three- 
day bus ride to Mexico City for a ten-day 
visit. I ended up staying fourteen months, 
playing in a movie sound track orchestra. 
After the war went to New York and worked 
in a music project called "Musical Work- 
shop" for hospitals and settlement work. Met 
my husband, Theodore Ward, and was 
married in 1946. Have a three and one-half 
year old son, Philip. (Sue and her husband 
run "The Carriage Trade Shop" in Ando- 
ver.) 

Emily Sloper Shailer — After graduation I 
went to Europe. After arriving home a 
serious car accident invalided me for a year. 
Finally I got well and went to business 
school in New Britain. Worked in my 
father's office for twenty years. Became Mrs. 
Russell H. Shailer on March 12, 1949. Still 
live in New Britain. 

We then read the following letters re- 
ceived by Sue. What happened to the rest of 
you? 

Pooh Dudley Burnham — "Our second 
daughter, Barbara, is graduating from 
North Yarmouth Academy this year so 
Mama's 25th has to be skipped. 'Twas ever 
thus!" 

Lois Dunn — "Best wishes to one and all. 
Sorry to miss the 25th. Find it impossible to 
do everything. My thoughts are with you." 

Fran Gould Parker — "Terribly sorry not to 
be with you all, but I've taken a back seat as 
far as my 'doings.' Have numerous parental 
fulfillments this week end for my four chil- 
dren. Have fun. Maybe I'll be there for our 
50th." 

Louise Hyde Reilly — "I'll review briefly 
my 25 years for you. Four years at Mt. 
Holyoke, four years at Dorland Bell School, 
Presbyterian Mission School in N. C. Five 
years at Utica Country Day (I was Dean of 
Girls and head of the French Dept.). Two 
years at the University School in Cincinnati. 
Two and a half years in Europe during 
World War II with General and Evacuation 
Hospitals (Red Cross Recreational worker) 
in England, France, Belgium, and Germany. 



13 




..J-*..'-. ,-..^S***^«k 



1928 

Back row, left to right — Virginia Gay d'Elseaux, Christine Bliss Billings, Elizabeth Hollis Sut- 
ton, Mary Piper Sears 

Front row, left to right — Susan Ripley Ward, Emily Sloper Shailer, Beatrice Lane Mercer, Mar- 
garet Nivison Chase 



Six months on a war bride ship, the Vulcania, 
on the Atlantic run— Naples, Alexandria, 
Le Havre, Southampton (four round trips). 
Six months in the Pacific on a Hospital 
Ship, The Hope, in the Philippines, Okinawa, 
Kobe, and Yokohama. Two and one-half 
years in Alaska, where I met my husband. 
About a year and a half in Long Beach, 
where my child, Christine, was born, and 
four years in the High Sierras teaching in a 
rural high school near Lake Tahoe and 
Reno. This summer I shall complete my 
work toward a Master's degree in Counseling 
and Guidance and I hope, eventually to get 
a post as dean, or girls' counselor." 

Louise sent a picture of herself and her 
child. She looks grand and has a very at- 
tractive child. After reading Louise's letter 
we all felt we had accomplished very little in 
twenty-five years. 

Helen Leavitt Fisher — via Bea Lane. Last 
fall Helen's husband attended the American 
School of Oriental Research in Jerusalem 
for one year. She has one boy. Bea brought 
a picture of Helen's wedding, and one of her 
child, who is very cute. 



Jo Paret Barrett — "Greetings! We are 
back stateside for the nonce. Colin, 14, is 
two inches taller than I and shaving. Sunny, 
aged 11, is writing like her Ma. We miss 
Germany. Dick is Exec, at Perrin A. F. 
Base next year. 

Kay Ross Brooks — "Marion Quinn lives 
near me in Arlington, Va. Hoped to be 
there, as my husband had a 25th at Exeter. 
Much to my disappointment we find we 
cannot make New England for our reunions." 

Connie Rundlett Huston — "My very best 
wishes to all with the hope that if anyone is 
near here she will let me know." (Santa 
Barbara in case any of you are starting out) . 

Elizabeth Ryan Hill — "My class news is 
about the same as before. We have three 
children, Sammy III, 16, Thomas R., 13, 
and Pamela, 10. My husband still works for 
the U. S. Government as an assistant high- 
way engineer and spends part of his time 
inspecting work on the new "Thru-Way" to 
N. Y. We have moved into a 10-room house 
and I am having a wonderful time re- 
decorating it myself." 

Betty Schuh Armstrong — "It is indeed hard 



14 



to believe that 25 years ago we were measur- 
ing heel heights, studying by flashlight, and 
speaking to Phillips Academy boys, but still 
having a rich experience in spite of frus- 
trations. With three children, a very busy 
husband, and many community activities, 
my life is full and very happy." 

Laura Snell Johnson — "All the best to all 
of you. Unfortunately Jerusalem and Cairo 
are too far apart for Helen Leavitt and me to 
have a reunion in the Middle East!" 

Jean Swihart Sherwood — "This is the re- 
union I especially hoped to make! Working 
hard. Hope to make the 50th — with luck I 
will." 

Theo Talcott Slater — "I remember our 
20th reunion so well and wish I could come 
to the 25th but I don't enjoy traveling with 
the back trouble I've had for some years, so 
would rather read about it afterward. I had 
a Christmas card from Louise Hyde Reilly." 

Theo sent a picture of her two children, a 
boy and girl — very handsome offspring. 

Barbara Vail Cristy — "It is with regret 
that I write news of myself and family, for it 
would be good to be with you all next week 
end. It just is not practical for me to be 
away. Another reason, Gwen Jones Hamblin 
'29 and her family are arriving the next 
week end for a visit. I have not seen her for 
nigh on to twenty years and I am looking 
forward to good fun." 

Babs has two girls, Ann and Lucy. 

Letters finished and talked out — the cock- 
tail hour had arrived. Following a very 
pleasant time we made our way up to the 
Inn for our class dinner. A most successful 
day. Unfortunately I had to leave Saturday 
night — so what went on after that is anyone's 
guess. 

Abbot is having its 125th Birthday next 
May. It has been suggested that as many 
classes as possible plan a reunion at that 
time. Perhaps 1928 can have another next 
year and gather a lot of strays. 

See you at our 30th anyway. 

Mary Piper Sears 
Reunion Chairman 

The Twentieth Reunion of 1933 

This is a greeting to those of you who were 
unable to come to your 20th reunion. It 
would be impossible to describe all that 
went on — twenty years have not dimmed 
our ability to talk and the day was over far 
too quickly. 



By eleven almost all of us had arrived and 
we went to the Alumnae Meeting in Abbot 
Hall. We found the benches just as hard as 
ever — the hushed atmosphere still clings, and 
I wish to report that certain members of 
our class still whisper and mutter while the 
platform speaks. Whip still giggles, Weaver 
still laughs as only she can do it, in fact 
everyone was just more of the same a few 
grey hairs later! 

Lunch was fun — the school chef (and wife) 
deserve a note of thanks for the really 
beautiful luncheon — we ate our way through 
lobster, turkey, aspic, salads, hot rolls and 
back again — we passed pictures and read 
letters aloud during coffee and elected Ethel 
Rogers Foster as class fund secretary. 

A letter from Peg Chase Johnson brought 
the wonderful news that after ten long years 
they have a baby daughter born in February. 
She claims not the class baby but she bets it's 
the last! Well, Girls? Want a contest? The 
baby's pictures were darling — congratula- 
tions Peg. 

Fran McGarry Ogg has a high-school boy 
of 15, a little league ball player of 12, and a 
daughter of 8. She lives near Chicago and 
would love to see Abbot friends. 

Peg Black Manz wrote they have bought a 
farm of 160 acres. Her 3^2-year-old son has 
covered every acre one way or another and 
they really love it. All Abbot friends are 
cordially invited! 

Jane Burnham Curry planned to come and 
had a reservation but was unable to make it 
at the last moment. What happened Jane, 
we missed you! 

Olive French Sherman has a daughter at 
Abbot. 

After lunch we roamed around and 
viewed all the new rooms and decorations. 
It was with some relief that I noticed the 
girls' rooms look the same, for the most part, 
as in our day. What a lovely thought — we are 
still in the same era! 

Well, we finally settled down in the Senior 
Parlor and had several hours of just plain 
gossip and gab. We discussed the important 
topic of a gift to the school from our class and 
everyone preferred to contribute to the 
Scholarship Fund. I think all of us remember 
our Abbot years with great affection and to 
help a girl go to Abbot seemed worthwhile 
and very sentimental. Everyone gave what 
she felt she could and when added to our 
mail contributions we had $92. We also 



l 5 




1933 

Back row, left to right — Jane Ritchie Shaw, Martha Whipple Davis, Olive French Sherman, 
Carolyn Guptill Hansen, Clara Smith Clark, Betty Weaver Van Wart, Ruth Tyler Smith '32, 
Mary Elizabeth Burnham Gazlay 

Front row, left to right — Kathleen Palmer Flynn, Martha Wind Finger, Ethel Rogers Foster, 
Lois Chapman Greene, Elizabeth Tompkins Madeley, Helen Rice Wiles 



had $28.12 in the bank and voted to put it 
to use, so our total gift was $1 20.12. So you 
see how every dollar swells the Fund and in 
no time at all another Abbot girl is on her 
way. 

When the day came to a close I felt we all 
went home with a very warm feeling and 
richer by far for having renewed friendships 
of very long standing. There were no years 
to bridge, we just all took up where we left 
off twenty years ago. It was quite a day and a 
very happy one. 

Carolyn Guptill Hansen 

Reunion Chairman 

The Fifteenth Reunion of 1938 

The nine girls of 1938 who met at school 
for our 15th class reunion on May 30th had 
a wonderful day together. Those who were 
unable to be with us were greatly missed. 
For your satisfaction, we found that basically 
we hadn't changed in these past years. 
There were a few pounds here or there and 
an added wrinkle or two, but we discovered 
early that we still had much in common, re- 



gardless of our divergent paths during the 
past fifteen years. Cookbooks have replaced 
textbooks, our family problems (mostly 
those which deal with our progeny) have 
taken the place of Algebra or Physics, and 
local Leagues of Women Voters have out- 
shadowed former Student Government 
procedures. 

After the Alumnae Meeting and a de- 
licious luncheon, we sat together comparing 
notes on our activities, our children, and our 
former classmates. Our class treasure was 
inspected, though its condition did not war- 
rant a too-close surveillance, and we quickly 
disposed of it. We hope Miss Sullivan's 
wastebasket was emptied long before she 
had to settle down to work in her office 
again. 

During the course of our "meeting" Mary 
Elliott Brown graciously accepted the five- 
year appointment as Class Agent and Phyl 
England Letts agreed to head up our in- 
formal class reunion to be held at Andover 
next May 8th, the occasion being Abbot's 
125th birthday. 



16 




!938 
Left to right — Jean Cross Maier, Constance Thurber Prudden, Margaret Comstock Bayldon, 
Anne Simpson White, Phyllis England Letts, Marion Lawson Archer, Mary Toohey Kruse, 
Mary Elliot Brown 




J 943 
Back row, left to right — Joyce Yoffa Rudolph, Barbara Lindsay Boynton 

Front row, left to right — Bettye Rutherford McCouch, Marilyn Tapper Mountain, Mimi Beck- 
man Huidekoper, Isabel Wiggin McDuffie 



17 



Connie Thurber Prudden, Mary Elliot 
Brown, Margaret Cornstock Bayldon and 
Mary Toohey Kruse were unable to stay for 
dinner, but Phyl England Letts, Marian 
Lawson Archer, Sally Peck, Jean Cross Maier 
and I went on to Fieldstones. After a pleasant 
meal there we separated once again, some 
of us returning to Draper Dramatics and 
others heading for Boston and home. 

It was a genuine treat to be back at Abbot 
as an alumna. I doubt that any of us felt 
quite as ancient or decrepit as we expected 
to, when we recalled how returning gradu- 
ates appeared to us as students. Abbot 
looked better than ever, and let's hope that 
many more of us will experience next May 
the thrill of a return to "home territory." 
Pudge Simpson White 

Reunion Chairman 

The Tenth Reunion of 1943 

Our big Tenth has come and gone, and 
those of us who were able to make it certainly 
agreed it was great fun. You can see in the 
picture who was there — Edna Nutton 
joined us later. We had lots of laughs opening 
our treasure box — the almost empty peanut 



butter jar still seemed in fine (edible?) con- 
dition! Polly's purty plain pocketbook, writ- 
ten-on calendars, photos, and many secret 
notes (all of which were sent unopened to the 
rightful owners) and the Prophecy and Will 
were all enclosed. 

Barbara Lindsay Boynton's parents enter- 
tained us at their house before our dinner at 
Fieldstones — we enjoyed and appreciated 
both occasions very much. 

It would take pages to tell you all of the 
class news — there are so many jobs and 
bouncing new offspring to report (our class 
is doing very well on that score). 

Please, please write to Joyce or me any 
news you have, with names and dates of 
babies, and to Miss Sullivan, if there is any 
change of address. 

Mimi Beckman Huidekoper 

Reunion Chairman 

The Fifth Reunion of 1948 

In spite of the fact that it appeared from 
the cards I received that most of the mem- 
bers of the class of '48 were about to be 
married, or engaged, or have infants, on or 
about the 30th of May, eight of us met for 




1948 
Back row, left to right — Mary Rich, Josephine Hildreth, Sally Lunt, Rosemary Jones 
Front row, left to right — Jane Kenah Dewey, Nancy Elliot Stewart, Barbara Sugar, Eleanor 
Wallis 



18 



our reunion. Mo Jones, MufTy Wallis and 
Mary Rich came on from New York. Mo, an 
alumna of Barnard, plans to work in New 
York and Muffy in her own words "sharpens 
pencils for Time, Inc." Mary works as a 
secretary. 

Barbara Sugar made the trip from Ohio, 
where she teaches school. Sally Lunt, back 
from a trip to Mexico, came over from Ip- 
swich. Nancy Elliot Stewart, who lives in 
Springfield, and Dodie Hildreth, who will 
go to Pakistan where her father is ambassa- 
dor, rounded out our group. 

After the Alumnae Meeting a delicious 
buffet luncheon was served in the dining 
room. We spent part of the afternoon having 
tea and catching up on the news of '48ers. 
Thank you so much, all of you who sent back 
the reply cards. The cards were passed 
around and we had great fun hearing what 
you were all doing. We thanked Sug for the 
fine job she has done as our class secretary 
and elected Nancy Elliot Stewart as secre- 
tary for the next five years. Her address is 
Mrs. Thomas Stewart, 30 Kenwood Ter- 



race, Springfield, Mass. She would love to 
hear from you. 

We had a delightful visit with Miss Hear- 
sey at Sunset. It was fun to hear about 
Abbot in '53 and the highlights of the last 
five years. She also had news of the faculty 
and of our classmates. 

The only disappointment of the day was 
our class treasure. As the metal cylinder was 
opened a rather horrible smell convinced us 
that all was not well. Most of the contents 
were quite moldy and we had to pull out 
our treasures with one hand and hold our 
noses with the other. A few of the recogniz- 
able objects were an Intervale place mat, 
some pills, a broken box, an Abbot Academy 
spoon (which we returned), several poems 
and calling cards, and a few decayed ciga- 
rettes. 

The tragedy of our treasure was forgotten 
as we had dinner at the Inn. The afternoon 
had gone all too quickly but we all felt our 
fifth reunion had been a great success. We 
were only sorry that more of you weren't 
with us. Here's hoping to see you in '58. 

Jane Kenah Dewey 

Reunion Chairman 



ABBOT SECOND CENTURY ALUMNAE FUND 

510 alumnae have contributed $4236.95 to the Fund since April 1, 1953. 

This is $500 more than last year at the same time, BUT only 16% of 
our alumnae are represented in this total. 

If your gift is not included, won't you please send your birthday gift to 
the Scholarship Fund immediately. 



$142 
84 
120. 12 

72 
77.22 

57 



The class of 1923 has the largest number of donors — 24. 
Congratulations to Ruth Holmes Durant, Class Fund Secretary of '23. 





CLASS REUNION GIFTS 




(included in above total) 


1878 


$5 1923 


1893 


210 1928 


1898 


6 o 1933 


!9°3 


49 i93 8 


1908 


120 1943 


J9I3 


52 1948 


1918 


60 



19 



Annual Meeting of the Alumnae 

Association 

SECRETARY'S REPORT 

The Abbot Academy Alumnae Association held its annual meeting on Saturday, May 30, 
at 11:15 a.m., in Abbot Hall. Miss Irene Atwood called the meeting to order, and read the 
names of the alumnae relatives in the Senior class. The list follows: 

Carol Burton — sister of Mary Burton Blakney, 1 946 

Patricia Earhart — granddaughter of Carrie Beat Earhart, 1891 ; cousin of Ann Kennedy, 

1953 
Patricia Eveleth — daughter of Ruth Larter Eveleth, 1924; cousin of Suzanne Larter, 1954; 

niece of Virginia Prest Lowery, 1934, and Marjorie Prest Olney, 1932 
Helen Glidden — sister of Joan Glidden, 1956 
Mary Grant — great-granddaughter of Delight Twichell Hall, 1873; great-grandniece of 

Olive Twichell Crawford, 1876, and Julia Twichell, 1879; grandniece of Delight Hall 

Gage, 1 901; cousin of Delight Hall Rothe, 1934 
Ann Kennedy — granddaughter of Carrie Beal Earhart, 1891 ; cousin of Patricia Earhart, 1953 
Audrey Taylor — cousin of Barbara Toung Benner, 1941 
Cornelia Weldon — sister of Jane Weldon, 1946 

The Seniors then marched in singing their class song. Miss Hearsey presented the class, 
and Miss Atwood welcomed them as new members of the Association. The Seniors sang 
salutes to Miss Hearsey, Miss Atwood, the 55- 50- and 25-year classes, and led the singing of 
"Fair Alma Mater." 

Miss Hearsey welcomed the large group of returning alumnae, and related some incidents 
about the early years of the school. She expressed the hope that as many alumnae as possible 
would return for the celebration of Abbot's 125th birthday on May 8, 1954. 

The following reports were read and accepted: Clerk, Jane Holt Atkinson, 19 19; Treas- 
urer, Helen Knight Wilkinson, 1922; General Secretary, Jane Sullivan, 1 93 1 ; Senior Alumnae 
Trustee, Jane Baldwin, 1922. 

Jane Sullivan read the names of alumnae whose deaths had been reported during the year. 

Helen Allen Henry's appointment as permanent trustee was announced. 

Greetings were sent to Miss Florence Swan, 1878, who was unable to be present for her 
fifty-fifth reunion. 

A gift of $2 10 was announced from the class of 1893 in memory of their former president, 
Anna Nettleton Miles. 

The following reunion chairmen read brief reports: 1898, Annie Smart Angus; 1903, Jean 
David B\unt; 1908, Dorothy Taylor; 1923, Miriam Sweeney McArdle; 1928, Susan Ripley Ward; 
1933, Carolyn Guptill Hansen; 1938, Anne Simpson White; 1943, Mimi Beckman Huidekoper; 
1948, Jane Kenah Dewey. The classes of 191 3 and 1918 deferred their official reunions until 

1954- 

The president expressed her appreciation to Helen Cutler Appleton, 1932, for the flower 
arrangements in the Alumnae Headquarters, and to Emily Bullock, 1931, and Barbara Lind- 
say Boynton, 1943, for their assistance in alumnae registration. Appreciation was also ex- 
tended to the Commencement ushers, Emily Bullock, 1931, chairman, Anisia Allen, 1952, 
Helen Cutler Appleton, 1932, Mary Dooley Bragg, 1936, Barbara Healey Holland, 1930, Clara 
Smith Clark, 1933, Anna Stefani, 1952, and Mary Toohey Kruse, 1938. 

The meeting was adjourned. 

C. Jane Sullivan 

General Secretary 



20 



June 1952 



TREASURER'S REPORT 1952-1953 
Balance in Andover National Bank 



$1084.84 



1952 

June 1 

6 

August 25 



Receipts 

Luncheon receipts 
Luncheon receipts 
Interest from invested funds 



94-50 
3-5» 

42 1 . 78 



1952 
June 23 



December 1 2 



J 953 

January 30 

March 1 3 

March 23 

April 10 



May 



May 



27 



Expenditures 

Osborne Sutton — Alumnae Tea 5 . 60 

Abbot Academy — Alumnae Luncheon 1 85 . 49 

Abbot Academy — Year Book 7 . 00 

Flowers J 4 -5° 

Miss Hearsey's Discretionary Fund 100.00 

Abbot Academy — Postage on Alumnae Fund Follow-Up 26 . 00 

American Alumni Council 56 . 25 

Curtis 1000 Inc. 46.25 

Eleanor M. Tucker — Slides of Abbot 22.35 

Geiger Bros. — Alumnae Fund 20.00 

Postage — Midwinter Luncheon 9 . 34 

Smith Alumnae Quarterly 2 . 00 

Junior League — Midwinter Luncheon 1 10.83 

Jane Sullivan — New York Abbot Club Trip J 4- 2 5 

Jane Sullivan — Portland Abbot Club Trip 4 . 70 

Senior Coffee Party 5-75 

Flowers — Alumnae Council 10.50 

Curtis 1000 Inc. 125.28 

Total % 766 . 09 

Balance in Andover National Bank 838 . 53 

Helen Knight Wilkinson, Treasurer 



I have examined the accounts and found the balance to be correct. 

Sally Bodwell Houghton, Auditor 



Mrs. Ernest F. Tillson (Gwendolyn F. Bloomfield '22) is the chair- 
man of the committee to select a new alumnae trustee. She would 
welcome suggestions for candidates, provided she receives them by 
November 15. 



21 



Mb. fylatff, batfA: 



HOW MUCH SHOULD I GIVE TO DO MY PART? 

These are the products of many minds, the union of heart and brain and 
hand. 

a. To a special account comes the sum of $196.40 as a gift "to be used in full 
toward a scholarship during the coming year." 

b. "Having had my sights lifted and spirit refreshed while at Abbot for 
Alumnae Council, I find my home work is easier and the days brighter. 
It's a real treat and privilege to return to Abbot. The Abbot Bulletin 
helps us all to become more aware of Abbot's needs and strengthens our 
confidence in her future." 

c. "I give to Abbot Academy, Andover, Massachusetts, the sum of Two 
Thousand Dollars to be added to the Concert Fund already existing in 
memory of Professor Downs," from Will of Mrs. Mary N. T. Jones of 
Andover. 

d. "Abbot is a lovely cultural school and all my life I have been grateful to 
her for the thorough training and beauty of bearing — I should like to 
give her a fortune and more if I had it to give." 

e. $2000 for "general purposes" from the executors of the Will of Ruth G. 
Chase of Milton, Massachusetts. 

f. $1 332.94 from Estate of Elizabeth Florence Swift, late of Andover, Massa- 
chusetts, representing a special unrestricted gift of $1000 and $332.94 as 
the residuary share under the Will. 

g. The Rosa R. Alden Fund now totals $2699.56. It has been increased re- 
cently by the receipt of $175.05 from an asset previously regarded as 
worthless. 

h. The life beneficiary set up in 1901 under the Catherine R. Binkley Trust 
has now deceased. The grantor having predeceased without issue, Abbot's 
share of $5283.28 has now been received. 

i. $2500 gift, unrestricted, in memory of George E. Abbot, late President of 
the Board of Trustees of Abbot. 

j. "Nothing gives me more pleasure than to enclose a check to help another 

girl as you so willingly helped during her last year at Abbot. 

With this check ($700) I can fulfil my financial obligation to Abbot. . . 
but never repay the school for its kindness, cooperation and advice during 
these trying months." 



We regret to report that no news has been received concerning 
Connie Smith who disappeared in July, 1952. 



22 



Changes of Address Since 
1952 Register 

Suggestion: Remove this list from the Bulletin, and attach it to 

your 1952 Register. 



1878 
Swan, Florence Aff. 

20 Thomas St., Portland 4, 



Me. 



1887 
Dunton, Angie 

Mrs. Marshall Purrington 

240 Mt. Vernon PL, Apt. 10, Newark, N. J. 

1889 
Cheever, Alice B. Aff. 

Mrs. James C. Bradlev 

1562 7th Ave., San Pedro, Calif. 

1894 
Simonds, Clara G. Aff. 

Mrs. George H. Wetherbee 

42 Talbot Rd., Braintree, Mass. 

1897 
Ware, Gertrude Huntington 

Mrs. Alexander Bunce 

150 Park St., Manchester, Conn. 

1899 
Childs, Ruth W. 

Mrs. Ernest C. Young 
110 Davis Ave., Brookline 46, Mass. 
Reed, Beatrice A. Aff. 

271 Dartmouth St., Boston, Mass. 

1900 
Gowdy, Caroline V. 

Mrs. George N. Venables 
434 Everson PI., Westfield, N. J. 
Gutterson, Constance R. 

Mrs. Horace Taylor 

228 East Islay St., Santa Barbara, Calif. 

1904 
Bampton, Nellie W. Aff. 

116 Cottage St., Medford, Ore. 
Harmon, Harriet B. Aff. 

33 Cliff Ave., So. Portland, Me. 

1905 
Sattler, Cornelia G. Aff. 

Mrs. C. Arthur Heinzelman 

600 McKinley Dr., East Main St., Station, Belle- 
ville, 111. 

1906 
Russell, Gertrude Aff. 

Mrs. Harry C. Ray 
Groton Long Point, Conn. 
Steckel, Anna E. 

Mrs. Arthur H. Cole 

15 Hemlock Rd., Cambridge, Mass. 



Ashley, Elsie T. 

Riva, Md. 



1907 



Aff. 



1908 
Caunt, Gertrude 

Mrs. Paul V. Barnes 
Box 212, South Pasadena, Calif. 
Chaffee, Helen E. Aff. 

Mrs. E. Perry Manville 

% Mrs. C. O. Walker, Box 232, Westport, N. Y. 



Parker, Esther 

Mrs. Sidney Lovett 

231 Park St., New Haven, Conn. 

1910 
Newcomb, Ruth W. 

34 Post Hill Rd., New London, Conn. 
Reigeluth, Ethel A. 

Mrs. Myron G. Darby 
1 10 Broad St., Naples, Fla. 

1913 
Bowman, Helen E. Aff. 

Mrs. H. Lester Janney 

100 South Riley Rd., Muncie, Ind. 
McLaughlin, Kathryn F. Aff. 

Mrs. James C. Barry 

68 Fieldwood Dr., Rochester 9, N. Y. 

1914 
Gens, Rosamond Aff. 

Mrs. Ferdinand Lehnert 

101 Tenth Ave., North, St. Petersburg, Fla. 

1915 
Larrabee, Mattie C. 

Mrs. Theodore P. Whittemore 

105 Meadowbrook Rd., Weston 93, Mass. 

1917 
Jackson, Ruth 

Mrs. Gerald D. French 

703 So. Catalina St., Los Angeles 5, Calif. 

1918 
Baxter, Mary C. Aff. 

Mrs. Leo D. Wright 

623 Woodhill Rd., Mansfield, Ohio 

1919 
Graham, Joyce Aff. 

Mrs. Frederick H. Taylor 
506 North Overlook Dr., Alexandria, Va. 
Meigs, Helen L. 

Mrs. Louis B. van Dyck 

P. O. Box 783, Cortland, N Y. 

1920 
McClive, Jean A. 

Mrs. John R. Weaver 
36 Concord PI., Snyder 21, N. Y. 
Parrott, Mary Isabelle Aff. 

Mrs. Lester Mitchell 
3530 Sunnyside Dr., Jacksonville 7, Fla. 
Sutherland, Isabel B. 

Mrs. William W. Kurth 

136 Salem St., North Andover, Mass. 

1921 
Dike, M. Kathleen Aff. 

15 Vine St., Melrose, Mass. 
Roser, Helen M. 

Nurses' Residence, 37 Jefferson St., Hartford, 
Conn. 

1922 
Dewey, Ruth 

Mrs. Ruth D. York 

16 Miles Standish Rd., Marblehead, Mass. 



23 



Tower, Alice W. Aff. 

Mrs. Norman W. Kirkby 

68 Lloyd Rd., Montclair, N. J. 

1923 
Damon, Edith I. 

Mrs. Stuart J. Bugbee 

809 West 32nd St., Wilmington 2, Del. 
Darling, Anne B. 

Mrs. Brooks Whitehouse 

57 Exchange St., Portland, Me. 
Gilmore, Virginia Aff. 

Mrs. George D. Pvle 

327 Third Ave., South, St. Petersburg, Fla. 
Taylor, Dorothy A. 

Mrs. Waller B. Booth, Jr. 

% Lt. Col. W. B. Booth, Jr., J-3, Hq. U. S. 
Eucom. APO 128, % PM., N. Y. 

1924 
Hardenbergh, Helen Aff. 

Mrs. John F. R. Seitz 

% Brig. General John F. R. Seitz, 017734 

45th Inf. Div. APO 86, % PM., San Francisco, 
Calif. 
Loomer, Barbara 

118 Main St., Andover, Mass. 
McKee, Margaret Aff 

Mrs. Leon E. De Yoe 

Old Mill Rd., RFD, Franklin Lakes, N. J. 

1926 
Black, Adelaide V. 

140 East 40th St., New York 16, N. Y. 
Clay, Katharine 

Mrs. Charles H. Sawyer 

16 Lincoln St., New Haven 10, Conn. 
Goodwillie, Patricia A. 

Mrs. Roger E. Blanchard 

107 Putnam Park, Greenwich, Conn. 
Lyman, Emily L. 

Mrs. Alfred P. Bell 

5602 Parkston Rd., Washington, D. C. 

1927 
Breese, Juliette B. Aff. 

Mrs. Harold C. Bennett 

530 N. E. 55th Terr., Miami, 38, Fla. 

1928 
Jackson, Elizabeth 

Mrs. Alan J. Kennedy 

Berkshire Farm School, Canaan, N. Y. 
Snell, Laura P. 

Mrs. Theodore S. Johnson 

57, Road 13, Maadi, Cairo, Egypt 
Thompson, Eleanor Aff. 

Mrs. James Snedeker 

510 Princeton, Fresno 4, Calif. 

1929 
Gilmore, Harriet B. 

Mrs. Lloyd R. Yoh 

419 Hopkins Lane, Haddonfield, N. J. 
Upham, Carol 

Mrs. James M. Fox 

R. R. 3, Grand Junction, Colo. 
Whitehill, Buth Aff. 

Mrs. Gordon J. Wygant 

767 Valley Rd., Upper Montclair, N. J. 

1930 
Atkinson, Louise 

Mrs. Reuben Dunsford 

Westview Ave., Nashville 5, Tenn. 
Cowee, Elenita 

Mrs. Howell D. Chickering 

720 Morningside Rd., Ridgeway, N. J. 
Hart, Margery Aff. 

Mrs. Chappell Cory 

66 Pleasant St., Somerset, Mass. 
Maxwell, Dora Aff. 

Mrs. Francis B. Harrison, Jr. 

2138-B 41st St., Los Alamos, N. M. 



Stout, Elizabeth 

Mrs. Harry A. Volz, Jr. 

3604 Basswood Lane, Louisville 7, Ky. 

1931 
Carr, Nancy W. 

Mrs. James D. Holmes 
358 32nd Ave., Columbus, Ga. 
Olson, Mary Elisabeth Aff. 

Mrs. Calvin C. Crum 

1712 West 48th St., Norfolk, Va. 

1932 
Allen, Helen 

Mrs. Lenert W. Henry 

25 Irving St., Hingham, Mass. 
Macfadden, Beverly Aff. 

Mrs. Roland Hebert 

15203 Camarillo St., Sherman Oaks, Calif. 
Nicholls, Virginia Aff. 

Mrs. Ferd de Anguera 

P. O. Box 173, Rockford, 111. 
Nichols, Cynthia Aff. 

Mrs. Harmon A. Harris 

31 Bolton Gardens, Bronxville, N. Y. 

1933 
McClary, Louise P. 

17 Terrace St., Malone, N. Y. 
Palmer, Kathleen C. 

Mrs. Patrick J. Flynn 
37 Eliot Ave., West Newton 65, Mass. 
Tower, Mariatta 

The Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

1934 
Caldwell, Elizabeth A. 

Dr. Elizabeth C. Hastings 
2110 Courtland Ave., San Marino, Calif. 
Coutant, Georgette Alicia Aff. 

Mrs. A. Marston Strathie 

River Road, Box 148, Titusville, N. J. 

1935 
Cutler, Ann C. 

Mrs. Joel M. Brecheen 

902 West Glendale, Phoenix, Ariz. 
Dawes, Jane 

Mrs. John H. McClennan 

Maple Dr., Fayetteville, R. D. 2, N. Y. 
Hurlburt, Anne 

Mrs. Stephen J. Bradley 

604 Kalmia Ave., Boulder, Colo. 
Look, Ernestine Aff. 

Mrs. Sheldon L. Land 

59 Furglade Ave., Springfield 8, Mass. 

1936 
Holland, Clara 

Mrs. Elwood N. Chase, II 

3233 Briggs Ave., Alameda, Calif. 
Swan, Mary L. 

2 West Hill PI., Boston 14, Mass. 
Wright, Sylvia A. 

Mrs. William F. Poole, III 

Lake Harris, Leesburg, Fla. 

1937 
Caldwell, Janet Aff. 

312 Garfield St., Seattle 9, Wash. 
Collens, Mildred deG. 

Mrs. Henry Laurens, Jr. 

752 South 5th St., Salina, Kan. 
Connelly, Frances 

Mrs. James R. Dowd 

21 Elkan Rd., Larchmont, N. Y. 
Kincaid, Nancy Aff. 

Mrs. Kincaid Vars 

407 Emerson Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 
Bose, Buth 

Mrs. George S. Stothoff 

Box 1071, Boston, Mass. 



24 



Swin I, Elizabeth 

Mrs. Malcolm McFarland 
339 Hewett Rd., Wyncote, Pa. 

1938 
Coll, Marjory B. 

Mrs. Lee Fields 
2621 31st St., Lubbock, Tex. 
Forman, Nancy Lee 

Mrs. Wayne Hall 

Laurel Road, New City, N. Y. 

1939 
Dickson, Mary E. A AT. 

Mrs. Robert C. Anderson 
1018 Frail Ave., Lima, Ohio 
MacMullen, Marjorie 

Mrs. Edwin A. Brewer 
168 Maple Ave., Shrewsbury, Mass. 
Sawyer, Adelle 

Mrs. George W. Wood, III 
354 No. Main St., Brewer, Me. 

1940 
Bixby, Kathryn I. Aff. 

Mrs. James B. Likowski 

6 Cresta Blanca, Orinda, Calif. 
Chandler, Frances 

Mrs. Wm. D. Futch 

426 19 Ave., N.E., St. Petersburg, Fla. 
Crocker, Phyllis 

Mrs. Clifford W. England 

5 Madison Ave., West, Winchester, Mass. 
Howard, Mary M. 

Mrs. Edmund W. Nutting 

21 Wave Ave., Wakefield, Mass. 
Whitney, Rachel M. 

Mrs. Wilbur M. Davis 

100 Pine St., Danvers, Mass. 

1941 
Curran, Joyce M. Aff. 

Mrs. John B. Nunez 

Daniels Farm Rd., Trumbull, Conn. 
Gerrish, Nancy 

Mrs. John A. MacFadyen, Jr. 

68 South St., Williamstown, Mass. 
Little, Margaret G. 

Mrs. John R. Dice 

920 Shoreham Rd., Grosse Pointe Woods 30, 
Mich. 
Moody, Verniece L. 

Mrs. Shields M. Bishop 

Pattersonville, N. Y. 
Poynter, Emily Ruth 

Apt. 102-B, 215 West Walnut Lane, Philadelphia 
44, Pa. 
Troub, Frances 

Mrs. Bertram H. Roberts 

4463 Whitney Ave., Hamden, Conn. 
Woodman, Susan B. Aff. 

Mrs. Robert T. McSherry 

106 Sherman Rd., Chestnut Hill 67, Mass. 

1942 
Barlow, Dorothy Aff. 

Mrs. John E. Gayton 

RFD 5, Chagrin Falls, Ohio 
Bertucio, Dr. Mary L. 

Babies Hospital, 622 West 168th St., New York 
32, N. Y. 
Craig, Helen W. 

Mrs. Jerome T. Jarrold 

6 Boulder Lane, Hicksville, N. Y. 
Finneran, Mary Ellen 

143 East 36th St., New York, N. Y. 
Hardy, Beatrice M. 

Mrs. Francis deL. Verdery 

R.. D. 1, Cumberland, Md. 
Hill, Barbara A. 

Mrs. William M. Kennedy 

760 West 11th St., Escondido, Calif. 



1943 
Bentley, Mary Elizabeth 

Mrs. Kenneth E. Spaulding, Jr. 

Vadnais St., Westfield, Mass. 
Cooley, Janet L. 

Mrs. William J. Sloss 

The British Embassy, Belgrade, Yugoslavia 
Feeney, Catherine F. 

Mrs. Joseph P. Flynn 

325 Clearfield Ave., Trenton, N. J. 
McLain, Hilton 

Mrs. Harry D. Greer 

1714 Columbia St., Vancouver, Wash. 
Monett, Betty-Lou 

Mrs. Louis B. Hess 

8910 Skokie Blvd., Skokie, 111. 
Peterson, Elizabeth Anne 

Macada Rd., Bethlehem, Pa. 
Pettengill, Patricia 

Mrs. John T. Whitaker 

3 Hopkins Place, Cincinnati, Ohio 
Schubert, Jean 

Mrs. Richard C. Acford 

60 Pleasant St., Cohasset, Mass. 

1944 
McMurray, Emily P. 

Mrs. Edgar T. Mead, Jr. 

20 East 84th St., New York 28, N. Y. 
Reid, Elizabeth 

Mrs. Jesse M. Buzby, Jr. 

Box 1728, San Juan, Puerto Rico 
Stevens, Priscilla 

Mrs. James W. Rutherford 

Box 227, Norwich, Vt. 

1945 
Bernardin, Josephine 

Mrs. Pieter L. deVries 

1452 Willard St., San Francisco, Calif. 
Boynton, Martha Ann 

Mrs. Robert H. Pawle 

170 Highland Ave., Buffalo 22, N. Y. 
Bufferd, Esther 

Mrs. Herbert Watstein 

% Bufferd, 11 Clearview Ave., Torrington, 
Conn. 
Lyons, Andrea 

Mrs. Robert F. Shoemaker, Jr. 

4909 Hampden Lane, Bethesda, Md. 
Mclver, Marian C. 

32 Shepard St., Cambridge, Mass. 

1946 
Finney, Virginia L. 

Mrs. Ira W. Rose, Jr. 

809 Simmons Ave., Enterprise, Ala. 
Fryling, Florence E. 

Mrs. Edmund S. Willis 

431 Vermont, Erie, Pa. 
Greene, Gretchen G. Aff. 

1435 Lexington Ave., New York, N. Y. 
Hardy, Ann R. Aff. 

RFD 1, Salisbury, Conn. 
Johnson, Katharine 

Mrs. Hollis L. Robbins 

27 Boyle St., Weston, Mass. 
Leinbach, Greta O. 

Mrs. Alexander F. Smith, 3rd 

5002 Walnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Malott, Janet Aff. 

Mrs. Jared Elliot 

678 Los Robles Ave., Palo Alto, Calif. 
North, Sally 

Mrs. Charles B. Jones 

Shore Rd., Ogunquit, Me. 

1947 
Brimer, Ruth Aff. 

Mrs. William B. McCredie 
347 East 52nd St., New York, N. Y. 
Cole, Janice H. 

48 Seneca St., Dobbs Ferry, N. Y. 



25 



Dowd, Helen E. 

Mrs. Gilbert B. Richards, Jr. 

5 East 67th St., New York, N. Y. 
Flather, Edith 

Swarthmore College, Swarthmore, Pa. 
Gierasch, Emily 

Johnson Hall, Andover, Mass. 
Gould, Diane 

Mrs. Norborne Berkeley, Jr. 

3 Sunrise Ave., New Canaan, Conn. 
Humason, Sally M. 

173 East 62nd St., New York 21, N. Y. 
Jaffer, Patricia 

Mrs. William Abernethy, Jr. 

401 Monmouth Ave., Spring Lake, N. J. 
Karelitz, Joan M. 

Mrs. Norman Brisson 

266 Harvard St., Cambridge, Mass. 
Marsh, Jean 

Mrs. Frank F. Coombs, Jr. 

Pope's Lane, Danvers, Mass. 
Meyer, Margot L. 

Warnken Rd., Salt Point, N. Y. 
Morse, Martha 

Mrs. John B. Abbot 

1 Main St., Westford, Mass. 
Ritchey, Jean 

Mrs. Douglas A. Bora 

20 Rowayton Ave., Rowayton, Conn. 
Scripture, Nancy Jane 

Mrs. Frederick Garrison 

20 Glendale Rd., Needham, Babson Park 57, 
Mass. 

1948 
Barnard, Patricia 

Mrs. Richard W. Lally 

72 Phillips St., Alexandria, La. 
Bergh, Anne D. 

Mrs. Norman A. Hull-Ryde 

108 So. Edgemont St., Gastonia, N. C. 
Bisgood, Brigid 

Mrs. Neal M. Galusha 

2330 South Ode. St., Arlington, Va. 
Dake, Barbara B. 

Mrs. Charles E. Johnson 

102 Fairmount Ave., Chatham, N. J. 
Davis, Sue W. 

Mrs. John A. Snyder 

535 East 72nd St., New York, N. Y. 
Hellier, H. Louise 

351 West 84th St., New York, N. Y. 
Jenkins, Carolyn L. 

5734 Bartlett St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 
MacManus, Josephine 

Mrs. William A. Woods 

175 Darlington Ave., Aberdeen, Md. 
Ogden, Elizabeth S. 

Mrs. David Tod 

48 Oriole Dr., Youngstown, Ohio 
Robinson, Ann 

Mrs. Jack B. Joyce 

1 B Ellinor Court, Navy Point, Warrington, Fla. 
Wallis, Eleanor O. 

351 West 84th St., New York 24, N. Y. 

1949 
Appell, Helen P. 

Mrs. Walter M. Norton 

"Four Winds" R. D. 2, Brunswick, Me. 
Black, Margaret 

Mrs. Richard P. Dintruff 

2771 Chili Ave., Rochester 11, N. Y. 
Dartt, Anne 

Mrs. William R. Leverich 

41 Maple Ave., Hamilton, N. Y. 
Dow, Barbara E. 

Mrs. Donald J. Freeman 

97 Galveston St., S. W., Washington, D. C. 



Hamby, Barbara C. 

140 East 38th St., New York, N. Y. 
Johnson, Faith 

Mrs. Henry S. Beard 

8 Woronoco Ave., Westfield, Mass. 
Newhall, Nancy 

Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing 

New York, N. Y. 
Olney, Madelon 

Mrs. M. Robert Paglee 

M.A.A.E., APO 794, % P.M., N. Y. 
Parks, Joanna M. 

Katharine Gibbs School, 90 Marlborough St., 
Boston 16, Mass. 
Pendleton, Mary L. 

6 Bennett St., Cambridge, Mass. 
Titcomb, Camilla L. 

Mary Wright Seminary, Tacoma, Wash. 
Williams, Deborah D. 

Mrs. R. Wallace Troemner, Jr. 

124 Triphammer Rd., Ithaca, N. Y. 

1950 
Bixby, Mary Evelyn 

Mrs. David M. Lamb 

222 South Main St., Bradford Mass. 
Dunsford, Anne 

Mrs. Eastham Hockmeyer 

North Village, Hamilton College, Clinton, N. Y. 
Flather, Beverley F. 

Mrs. Charles G. Edwards 

17 Shaler Lane, Cambridge, Mass. 
Gibbon, Roberta Ann 

Mrs. Neligh Coates, Jr. 

6430 Indian Lane, Kansas City, Mo. 
Griffin, Joyce 

Mrs. Richard B. Kurz 

400 Claranna Ave., Dayton 9, Ohio 
Wright, Lucy Ann Aff. 

Mrs. Peter Case 

4116 Leavell, El Paso, Tex. 

1951 
Godfrey, Joan 

775 Trapelo Rd., Waltham, Mass. 

1952 
Leach, Janet 

Florence Hall, 112 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 
Penwell, Nancy 

11 Locke St., Andover, Mass. 

1953 
Brouillard, Muriel Aff. 

6 Northwood Rd., Beverly, Mass. 



PAST FACULTY 

Baker, Miss M. Dorothy 

107 Shakespeare Ave., Bath, England 
Baynes, the Misses Hilda and Hope 

1016 Seventh Ave., North, St. Petersburg, Fla. 
Brooks, Miss Eleanor 

Box 248, Falmouth, Mass. 
Buckley, Miss Barbara Ann 

31 Lowell St., Andover, Mass. 
Euston, Mrs. Alexander 

(Barbara Humes) 

284 Pomeroy Ave., Pittsfield, Mass. 
Rohrbach, Mrs. Elizabeth C. 

St. Catherine's School, Richmond, Va. 
Sainati, Mrs. Edward (Marguerite Jupp) 

17 Grove St., New York 14, N. Y. 
Tinker, Miss Jean P. 

Rylstone House, Clarence Drive, Harrogate, 

Yorkshire, England 



26 



5tt iMemortam 



1879 

Julia Emeline Twichell died August 4, 
1953, in Andover. For many years she was 
the beloved assistant librarian in the Ando- 
ver Public Library. Miss Twichell was the 
president of the semi-centennial class, and 
was active in the celebration of Abbot's 100th 
birthday. A former president of the Alumnae 
Association, she was always alive to alumnae 
interests. 

1887 

Jeanie Carter (Mrs. William R. Prall) died 
August 14, 1953, in Boonton, N.J. (See class 
notes of 1887.) 

1898 

Clare March (Mrs. Arthur W. Denison) 
died October 10, 1952. 

1900 

Alice B. Boutwell (Mrs. George N. Pease) 
died April 14, 1953, in Corona del Mar, 
California. (See class notes of 1900.) 

1902 

Lela Carrie Elliott (Mrs. Walter H. Rus- 
sell) died May 4, 1953, in Port Arthur, On- 
tario. 



1905 

Elsie Jeffers (Mrs. Joseph H. Hobbs) died 
January 9, 1953, in Clearwater, Florida, 
after a long illness. She is survived by her 
husband. 

1915 

Marion C. Hamblet (Mrs. Ernest R. 
Greene) died August 12, 1953, in Hanover, 
N. H., after a long illness. She is survived by 
her husband, two daughters and a son. Our 
deepest sympathy is extended to her sisters, 
Helen Hamblet Dyer, 1914, and Katherine 
Hamblet, 1920. 

1916 

Ruth Moore (Mrs. John A. Lyons) died 
September 1 1, 1953, in Hyannis, Mass., as a 
result of a fractured skull received in a fall 
down the cellar stairs at her summer home 
in Chatham. Our sincere sympathy is ex- 
tended to her daughters, Ruth Lyons, 1944, 
and Andrea Lyons Shoemaker, 1945. 

1933 

Rachel C. Place (Mrs. Rachel P. Smith) 
died May 10, 1953, in Somerville, Mass. 



Class News 



1887 

It is with a feeling of great sadness that 
we write of the death of Jeanie Carter Prall, 
one of the class of '87. She died at her home 
in Boonton, New Jersey, August 14, after 
days of unconsciousness. One cannot say 
enough of her brave spirit and wonderful 
will power — years of suffering from acci- 
dents and falls never changed her courage 
nor her cheerfulness — always keeping open 
house, welcoming family and friends, cele- 
brating all anniversaries for children, grand- 
and great-grandchildren — as interested in 
all Abbot's doings as when she was herself a 
girl there, going to reunions whenever possi- 
ble, she has been indeed one of the "Great 
Hearts" of our country. 

She will be greatly missed. We sympa- 
thize deeply with Russell and Marion, her 
son and daughter and all her many relatives 



and friends. We have lost a great soul — a 
loving member of The Class of '87. 

Angie Dunton Purrington's daughter, Hilda, 
is taking courses in New York this fall. 

In the class letter Jeannie Jillson men- 
tioned her flowers. She still keeps up with 
her reading club and lectures. 

Harriet Thwing wheels herself from her 
hospital room to her room at Amassa Stone 
House to look up class records, and make her 
entries. Her fractured hip bone has healed, 
and she hopes she will soon be walking and 
taking up some of her regular duties. 

1894 

Hanna Greene Holt is spending the fall in 
Bennington, Vermont. 

1899 

The class extends its sympathy to Ruth 
Childs Young, whose husband died Septem- 
ber 20, 1953. 



27 




Margaret Wilson Gerber '03 and her""grand- 
children 

1900 

The tragic accident causing the death of 
Alice Boutwell Pease is a shock and great loss 
to all who knew her. That she died instantly 
without pain or suffering is comforting to her 
husband and family of children and grand- 
children. 1 900 sends expressions of profound 
sympathy. 

1900's contribution to the Second Century 
Alumnae Fund shows a 300% increase this 
year. Good old class — keep it up! 

Grace Chapman Spear 

Class Fund Secretary 

The following news bulletins were com- 
piled by your Class Fund Secretary. 

Emma Bixby Place winters at Zephyr Hill, 
Fla., and spends the summer at Francestown, 
N. H. 

Caroline Gowdy Venables has recently 
moved to Westfield, N. J. 

Mildred Guild Marshall and her husband 
celebrated their fiftieth wedding anniversary 
on April 2, 1953. 

Constance Gutterson Taylor lives in Santa 
Barbara, Calif., sharing an apartment with 
her sister, Hildegarde Gutterson Smith, 1914. 
She is still keeping on with her work, and 
was anticipating the return of her son, Tom, 
and his family from Oslo, Norway. 

Mary Morgan Norwood spent the past 
summer in New Hampshire. 

Winifred Todd Mills wrote of many inter- 
esting events in St. Stephen, N. B., in con- 
nection with the Coronation. Her mother, 
who chaperoned our graduation dance at 
the November Club, was 94 this September. 
Though feeble, she still has a keen interest in 
all that happens in her town, and keeps in 
touch with her host of friends. 



Alice Wood Hodgdon opened her delight- 
ful house in Boothbay Harbor again this 
summer for the Garden Club's annual flower 
show. She is active in many other civic 
interests in Boothbay Harbor. 

Mabel Woodside Demack's husband, Leo, 
died in March of this year following a long 
illness. The class extends its deepest sym- 
pathy to Mabel. 

1903 

Jean David Blunt was the only member of 
the class who returned for reunion. 

1906 

The class extends its sympathy to Molly 
Jordan Goodrich whose mother died Sep- 
tember 1, 1953, at the age of 93. 

1908 

Mary Elizabeth de Windt Hauser writes 
that her three children are married, and she 
has seven grandchildren. Her son, John, is 
rector of the Episcopal Church in Chester, 
Pa. 

Esther Parker Lovett reports the birth of 
her sixth grandchild, Catherine Lovett, the 
daughter of Sidney Lovett, Jr. Esther's 
husband, the Chaplain of Yale University, 
was recently appointed master of Pierson 
College, one of the ten residential colleges 
at Yale. 

Esther Stickney Alley trains the sales force 
for a beauty-counseling service. 

1909 

Edith Van Horn Matson's youngest son 
graduated from West Point in June. 

1910 

Emily Silsby Morgan went to the Philip- 
pines last winter, and then took an Oriental 
cruise on the President Cleveland. The boat 
called at Hong Kong and two Japanese 
ports. Coming home she visited Victoria 
and crossed the Canadian Rockies. 

The class extends its sympathy to Gertrude 
Swanberg Cryan whose husband died Febru- 
ary 19, 1953- 

Louise Tuttle Abbott spent last winter with 
her youngest daughter in Waukegan, 111. 



The class of 1910 has started a fund to 
purchase books in memory of their class- 
mate, Mira B. Wilson. 



28 



1916 

Grace Merrill Emery writes, "On the move 
again — this time to the U. S. Naval Air 
Station at Quonset Point, R. I., where my 
husband will be Public Works Officer on the 
staff of the Commander. We are sorry to 
leave Washington in the spring when the 
city is a veritable garden, but we are de- 
lighted to be coming back to New England." 

1917 

Frances Gere has left The Bishop's School 
and returned to her home in Syracuse. She 
is working in the Art Department of Crouse- 
Hinds Company, a concern which makes 
electrical equipment. The work consists of 
developing advertisements for commercial 
magazines and retouching photographs for 
advertising purposes. 

1918 

Julie Sherman Tibbetts writes that she has 
eleven grandchildren. 

1919 

The class extends its sympathy to Helen 
Bradley Pease whose father died May 13, 1953. 

Jane Holt Atkinson's son, Theodore M., 
Jr., who graduated from Yale Divinity 
School in June, was ordained in the First 
Congregational Church in Winchester, Octo- 
ber 18. He is assistant minister at the South 
Congregational Church in Pittsfield. Her 
son, Robert, is in the Navy, stationed at 
Norfolk. Her youngest son, John, is a fresh- 
man at the University of New Hampshire. 

1920 

Paula Miller Patrick writes, "Pat, my 
husband, and I, with our sons, Wayne, 18, 
and Billy, 13, are home from seven months 
in Europe and the Near East. I believe it was 
twenty-three countries and sixty-five hotels, 
as Billy put it, from Egypt to Ireland via 
Israel and Yugoslavia. Sailing just ahead of 
the Channel flood, in Turkey for the earth- 
quake, in Athens for Stalin's death, and in 
England for Coronation week. In Paris our 
son, Hugh, 233^2, joined us from his eighteen 
months civilian job in Tokyo, and he came 
home with us, though he returns to Japan 
soon." 

Helen Thiel Gravengaard writes that her 
12-year-old daughter, Karen, is in the eighth 
grade at Miss Doherty's Preparatory School 
in Cincinnati. 



Leonore Wickersham Mills has a new 
granddaughter, Ellen Lee O'Brien, born 
last January to her daughter, Georgia Lee, 
Abbot, 1946. Leonore went to California to 
be with Georgia Lee. 

1921 

Helen M. Roser has been appointed Asso- 
ciate Director of the Hartford Hospital 
School of Nursing in charge of nursing edu- 
cation. 

1922 

Catherine Damon Mason has built a new 
home in Westfield, N. J. Her son goes to 
Colgate. She has two wonderful grand- 
children. 

Ruth Dewey York writes that her son, 
Bobby, is now eleven years old. She is teach- 
ing first grade in Nahant, Mass. 

Marian Saunders Cheesborough reports the 
birth of her first granddaughter on April 2. 
She wrote, "Abbot material at last!" Her 
son, George, is an officer at the Naval Supply 
School in Bayonne, N. J., and her youngest 
son, Tom, is in the army stationed at Camp 
Gordon, in Augusta, Ga. 

1923 

Edith Damon Bugbee writes that her 
daughter, Kay, is with American Airlines, 
and her two sons are at Dartmouth. 

Elizabeth Flagg Dow's daughter, Eliza- 
beth, is engaged to Robert Lown of Mil- 
waukee, Wis. 

Dorothy King Pitcher writes, "I have two 
granddaughters. One of my sons graduated 
from Boston University Law School, and has 
his own law office in Woonsocket, R. I. My 
other son was graduated from the University 
of Vermont and is working in Burlington." 

Dee Osborne Hall writes, "Plenty of excite- 
ment slated for the second week end in June. 
My husband celebrates his 50th Dartmouth 
Reunion, and Jack, our son, graduates at 
the same time. He has just received the 
Dartmouth Cup, having been chosen the 
'senior athlete who on and off the field re- 
flects the greatest credit to the College.' He 
starts the Marine Officer Training Program 
in July." 

1924 

Margaret McKee DeYoe writes that her 
son, Wood, was married in May. He has 
passed the New Jersey Bar Examinations, but 
is now serving in the Army in the Far East. 



29 



Margaret hopes to attend her thirtieth re- 
union next year. 

1925 

Elizabeth Burtnett Horle writes, "My 
daughter, Judy, is 15, and is in her junior 
year at Austin High School. Garrison is 12, 
and graduated from grade school last May. 
I do volunteer work in a mother and baby 
clinic and at Ft. Bliss Blood Center. I also go 
to Art School." 

Elizabeth Ward Saunders' husband, Don- 
ald, was director of the Summer School for 
Writers at the University of Colorado. Eliza- 
beth gave a delightful morning coffee party 
for Constance Parker Chipman '06, when the 
latter was visiting in Boulder in June. 

1926 

Katharine Clay Sawyer's husband, who is 
dean of the Yale School of Fine Arts, re- 
ceived an honorary degree from Clark Uni- 
versity in June. 

Elinor Mahoney Smith writes, "My 14^- 
year-old son, Philip C. R., is entering Ando- 
ver in the Junior class this fall. How the 
time flies! He went with my husband and 
me on a Caribbean cruise last spring. 

"I continue my interest in dramatics and 
take part in amateur productions whenever 
possible." 

1928 

Laura Snell Johnson has a house in Maadi, 
Egypt, with a garden containing 1 1 mangoe 
trees, 1 guava, 1 plum and 1 apricot tree. 
She expects plenty of fruit! 
Married 

Elizabeth Jackson Rustin to Alan J. Ken- 
nedy, May, 1953. 

1929 

The class extends its sympathy to Joyce 
Jarman McNamara whose father died recent- 

ly. 

1931 

Mary Elisabeth Olson Crum went to 
Florida last winter, and on the way home 
spent a week end with Nancy Can Holmes. 

1932 

Helen Allen Henry and her husband have 
bought their "dream house" in Hingham, 
and hope to move by the end of September. 



1933 

Mariatta Tower is teaching Mathematics 
at The Baldwin School in Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

1935 

The class extends its sincere sympathy to 
Claire Cregg Derby whose husband died 
suddenly in August. 

Jane Dawes McClennan, her husband, and 
four children, have returned to Fayetteville, 
N. Y. Her husband has completed his tour of 
duty with the Air Force. 

Anne Hurlburt Bradley and her four children 
live in a ranch-type home in Boulder, Colo. 
Her husband, Steve, manages a ski resort. 
Her eight-year-old son is an accomplished 
ski jumper. 

Married 

Ann Cutler Squier to Joel M. Brecheen. 
Ann writes "We seem to be starting a resort — 
swimming pool, two units — tennis courts 
next. Joel is a tennis pro." 
Born 

To Doris Anderson Clark, a daughter, 
Carolyn Wightman, April 20, 1953. 

1936 

Sylvia Wright Poole and her husband are 
building a ranch-style house on Lake Harris 
in Leesburg, Fla. Her husband is in the 
general insurance business in Leesburg. 
Born 

To Caroline Rockwell Stevens, a fourth 
child and third daughter, Cornelia Rock- 
well, April 22, 1953. 

1937 

Mildred Collens Laurens writes, "After 
living in Oklahoma for three years we are 
moving to Salem, Kan., where Henry will go 
into private practice. Henry is now a certi- 
fied internist, and also does gastroscopy, as 
well as internal medicine and gastroen- 
terology. Our three children, Tuck, 8, Kay, 
5, and Mildred, 3, are all looking forward to 
our new life." 

Elizabeth Inman Kirkpatrick and her 
three children went to Guam in July. Eliza- 
beth's husband is in the Air Force, and they 
expect to remain on Guam for two years. 

Bunny Risley Stever and her husband spent 
six weeks traveling in France and Switzer- 
land this summer. 

1938 

Born 
To Elizabeth Garvey Murphy, a fifth 



3° 









child and fourth son, Robert Maurice, May 
h 1953- 

1939 

Adelle Sawyer Wood, her husband, and 
four daughters, are "finally settled down in 
Maine." Her husband opened his office last 
year, and they have bought a house. 
Born 

To Dorothy Heidrich Lockhart, a second 
son, April 6, 1953. 

To Marjorie MacMullen Brewer, a son, 
Howard Stanley, September 14, 1953. 

1940 

Jeanne Cowles Wilson adopted a daughter, 
Nicole, July 29, 1952. 

Danna Whitlock DeBragga writes, "Joe 
and I adopted a fine boy in December of 
1 95 1. We built in Islip three years ago and 
like it very much. Joe is in the export field in 
New York." 

Married 

Suzanne Chadwick Gilbert to Richard R. 
Bush, lieutenant in the U. S. Signal Corps 
serving in Korea. 

Born 

To Anne Rivinius Wild, a third son, Peter 
Marden, August 10, 1953. 

To Mary Spaulding Powell, a son, Boiling 
Raines, III, October 13, 1952. 

1941 

Joyce Curran Nunez writes that at the 
completion of her husband's two years with 
the Navy, they spent three months touring 
Europe. Their nine-year-old son accom- 
panied them. Joyce also has two daughters, 
Lee Ann, 6, and Maureen, 4. Her husband is 
associated with the Riegel Paper Corp. in 
New York. 

Helen Stott is head of the Music Depart- 
ment at the Springside School. 
Born 

To Dorothy Fiske Winnette, a fourth son, 
Lyle Curtis, April 25, 1953. 

To Emily Mills Courtice, a son, Daniel 
Taylor, March 8, 1953. 

To Verniece Moody Bishop, a son, John 
Guy, III, May 30, 1953. Verniece's husband 
is working for the General Electric Com- 
pany, and they have bought a new home in 
Pattersonville, N. Y. 

To Nancy Whittier Atkinson, a daughter, 
Sydney Ellen, April 1 1, 1953. 



Abbot needs more blue com- 
mencement gowns and caps be- 
cause next year's class is a large 
one. It is impossible to buy any 
more of them, and the school 
would appreciate having yours, if 
you have no further use for it. 



1942 

Dorothy Barlow Gayton writes that for 
the second time in three years she is settling 
a new home. Her husband is now with the 
Reliance Electric and Engineering Co. in 
Cleveland. Dorothy has three children, 
Janet, 4, Larry, 2, and Ann, born October 

i7> 1952. 

Helen Craig Jarrold writes, "My husband 
has been transferred to the sales department 
of the Sperry Gyroscope Co. in Great Neck, 
N. Y. This will be our last move for a while. 
Our oldest girl is four, Wendy is three, and 
Steven Craig was born January 3, 1953. I 
hope to see some of my Abbot friends now 
that we are in the East again." 

Patt Daniels Hanson's husband is with 
the Borden Company in Seattle. Her oldest 
son, Danny, has just finished the first grade. 
Patt had a reunion with Betty Jean England 
Olsen last summer. 

Margaret Hill Bell's husband has been 
transferred to Los Angeles. He is having a 
book published by Houghton Mifflin Co. 
in March, 1 954, entitled We Adopted a Daugh- 
ter. 

Born 

To Jeanne Bower sox Wilson, a first son and 
second child, Kenneth Chalmers, Jr., De- 
cember 26, 1952. 

To Margaret Stuart Beale, a third child, 
Harriet Sanford Stuart, May 13, 1953. 

To Beverley Winslow Hansen, a second 
daughter, Wendy Winslow, August 12, 1953. 

To Ann Zeitung Hale, a third child and 
second son, Jonathan Bradford, January 13, 
1953- 

1943 

Cynthia Lovely is head of the Physical 
Education Department at the Knox School. 

Married 
Janet Cooley to William John Sloss of 
Oxford, England, July 1 1 , 1 953, in Rensselaer- 
ville, N. Y. Mr. Sloss was graduated from 



31 



St. Edward's School, Oxford, and Pembroke 
College, Oxford University. He is now 
Third Secretary at the British Embassy in 
Belgrade. 

Hilton McLain to Harry Douglas Greer, 
Jr., June 27, 1953, in Douglas Hills, Staten 
Island, N. Y. 

Born 

To Jean Craig Fitzgerald, a third child and 
second son, Craig Millis, April 8, 1953. 

To Polly Osborne Smith, a third child and 
first daughter, Perrin, November 1, 1952. 

To Marilyn Tapper Mountain, a second 
child, first son, Clifton Fletcher, Jr., August 

27, 1953- 

1944 

Carol Paradise spent the summer traveling 
with the Migrant Workers under the auspices 
of the Council of Churches. 

Priscilla Stevens Rutherford's husband has 
graduated from medical school, and is in- 
terning at the Mary Hitchcock Hospital in 
Hanover, N. H. Priscilla and her family are 
living in Norwich, Vermont, near Hanover. 

Married 

Elizabeth P. Reid to Jesse Milton Buzby, 
Jr., of San Juan, Puerto Rico, July 25, 1953. 
Mr. Buzby is a graduate of Kent School, 
Harvard, and the Cornell Graduate School 
of Business and Public Administration. He 
served in the United States Navy during 
World War II. He is now with the Standard 
Oil Company of New Jersey in Puerto Rico. 

Emily McMurray to Edgar Thorn Mead, 
Jr., May 30, 1953, in New Canaan, Conn. 
Cornelia McMurray Brooks was matron of 
honor. Mr. Mead is a graduate of the Choate 
School and Williams College. He is with 
Argus Research Corporation. 

Born 

To Jacqueline Calvin Johnson, a son, Paul 
Christian, August 5, 1953. 

To Alma Mastrangelo Strabala, a daughter, 
Gail Marie, April 22, 1953. The class will be 
sorry to learn that Alma's father died in 
April. 

To Margaret Travis Atwood, a daughter, 
Jill Elizabeth, June 15, 1953. 

1945 

Martha Anne Boynton Pawle's husband 
graduated from Tufts Medical School in 
June, and is now interning at the Meyer 
Memorial Hospital in Buffalo. 



Married 
Andrea Lyons to Robert F. Shoemaker, 
Jr., May 23, 1953. Mr. Shoemaker served 
two years in the U. S. Navy and is a graduate 
of George Washington University. 
Born 
To Martha Boynton Pawle, a daughter, 
Elizabeth Winslow, September 26, 1953. 
To Miriam Dearborn Dunn, a son, May 24, 

J953- 

To Gretchen Fuller Frazier, a third child 
and second son, David Kim, July 9, 1953. 

1946 

Nancy Burns Brelis has two daughters. 
The younger is named Jane Austen Emer- 
son. Her husband has been the Seattle 
Bureau Chief for Time, Life, and Fortune. 
They are planning to retire to New England, 
so Dean can do free lance writing. 

Nancy Thomas Whitcomb writes that she 
expects to be a resident of Illinois for a year 
and a half. Her husband is head of Vision 
magazine's office in Space Selling in Chi- 
cago. 

Married 

Anne Fisher to Ens. Andrew J. Riker of 
Manchester, Conn., September 26, 1953. 
Ens. Riker, a graduate of the Pomfret 
School, attended Trinity College and the 
University of Colorado. He was a prisoner 
of war for nine months, having been shot 
down in enemy territory November 4, 1952, 
on his second mission. He was repatriated in 
August, and Anne flew to San Francisco to 
meet him. 

Greta Oberlaender Leinbach to Alexander 
Forbes Smith, 3rd, June 12, 1953, in Read- 
ing, Pa. 

Born 

To Barbara Barnard Clement, a son, May 

24> J 953- 

To Mary Burton Blakney, a son, John 

Christian, June 25, 1953. 

To Dorothy King Garner, a daughter, 
Susan Bourne, February 17, 1953. 

To Georgia Lee Mills O'Brien, a second 
child and first daughter, Ellen Lee, January 
20, 1953. Ellen's brother, Wick, is two years 
old. ~ 

To Sally North Jones, a son, Jeffrey 
Charles, September 14, 1953. 

1947 

Virginia Eason visited Dolly Sharp in 
Chicago on her way home from Elizabeth 



32 



Ogden's wedding. Virginia works for Junior 
League charities in Oklahoma City. She 
sees Alden Obering and Helen Hoehn fre- 
quently. 

Edith Flather is a research assistant in 
Astronomy at the observatory at Swarth- 
more College. She was recently elected to 
membership in the American Astronomical 
Society. 

Margot Meyer spent the month of Sep- 
tember on a motor trip to California and 
British Columbia. 

Martha Morse Abbot writes that her hus- 
band graduated from Harvard Business 
School in June, and is now working for a 
worsted company in Westford, Mass. They 
have bought an old summer house which 
they are winterizing and redecorating. 
Mouse says, "It is wonderful to be living out 
in the country — new, for me, a city girl." 

Darlene Sharp writes, "I am now working 
for NBC in Chicago as a 'production 
assistant' in Television, more or less as an 
assistant to the producer of 'Zoo Parade', 
'Welcome Travelers', 'Mr. Wizard', and 
several others. I love the work and the 
people, and I'm having the time of my life 
playing around in a very exciting field. I 
don't even mind too much when I have to 
work 7 days a week, and often from 8:30 
a.m. to 10:30 p.m.!" 

Married 

Ruth Brimer to William Black McCredie 
of Elgin, 111., May 30, 1953, in Andover, 
Mass. Mr. McCredie attended Exeter 
Academy, and was graduated from Williams 
College. 

Ann Clemens to Shepard Cherry Low- 
man, July 30, 1953, in New York City. Mr. 
Lowman was graduated from the Univer- 
sity of Kentucky and from Harvard Law 
School. He served in the Navy in World 
War II. They will live in Germany where 
Shepard will be employed by the Interna- 
tional Fidelity Insurance Company of Dallas. 

Joan M. Karelitz to Norman Brisson, 
June 28, 1953. Mr. Brisson is a graduate of 
Harvard, and served with the Armed Forces 
during World War II. 

Nancy Scripture to Frederick Garrison, 
June 6, 1953, in Cohasset, Mass. Cynthia 
Austin was maid of honor. Mr. Garrison is a 
graduate of Harvard College and Business 
School. He is with the New England Con- 
fectionery Company in Cambridge. 



Born 

To Nancy Barnard Soule, a son, Christo- 
pher, June 17, 1953. 

To Beverly DeCesare Nassar, a son, 
August 23, 1953. 

To Jean Ritchey Bora, a son, Douglas 
Arthur, April 23, 1953. 

To Geraldine Treadway Dampier a 
daughter, Suzanne Lorraine, August 31, 
1953- 

1948 

Marty Barber finished her training as a 
medical technician at the University of 
Virginia. 

Beth Dignan is teaching third grade in 
the Boston public schools. 

Ellen Dignan is in her second year at 
Tufts Medical School. 

Dodie Hildreth is living in Karachi, 
Pakistan, where her father is U. S. Ambassa- 
dor. 

Rosemary Jones received an A.B. degree 
from Barnard and majored in English Liter- 
ature. She is now working with the Herald 
Tribune Fresh Air Fund. 

Ann Sarolea spent three months in Paris 
painting. 

Renate Sides received a bachelor's degree 
in Arts and Letters from Pennsylvania State 
College in June. 

Helen Tasche is studying Architecture at 
the Harvard Graduate School of Design. 

Married 

Barbara Dake to Dr. Charles Clark 
Johnson of Union, N. J., July 18, 1953, in 
Andover, Mass. Lee Howe was one of the 
bridesmaids. Dr. Johnson was graduated 
from Yale and from the University of Penn- 
sylvania Dental School. He served with the 
Army in the Pacific area. 

Sue Wilds Davis to John Anthony Snyder 
of New York, May 2, 1953- John attended 
Hackley School, Harvard University, and 
graduated from Harvard Business School. 
He is with the National City Bank in the 
Overseas Division. Sue spent her honey- 
moon in Bermuda. She hopes to return to 
her work with Vogue magazine this fall. 

Carolyn June England to Charles Henry 
Wansker, Jr., September 12, 1953, in Win- 
chester, Mass. Nancy England Worthen '39 
was matron of honor. 

Mary Katharine Lackey to Samuel Curtis 
Stowell of Larchmont, N. Y., August 29, 
1953, in Pelham Manor, N. Y. Mr. Stowell 



33 



was graduated from Phillips Andover, and 
Yale. He was recently released from duty in 
the Navy. He will attend Harvard Business 
School this fall. 

Josephine MacManus to William A. 
Woods, June 6, 1953. 

Ann Robinson to Ensign Jack Berry 
Joyce, August 1, 1953, in New London, 
Conn. Alison Carter was one of the brides- 
maids. Ensign Joyce attended the University 
of New Mexico and was graduated from 
Princeton in 1952. 

Mackay Selden to Robert Huntington 
Bush of Horseheads, N. Y., June 6, 1953. 
Mr. Bush is a graduate of Union College, 
and is director of information for the Ameri- 
can Textbook Publishers Institute. 
Born 

To Katherine Barrell Shepard, a son, 
John Field, Jr., August 28, 1953. 

To Nancy Douglass Smith, a son, Douglass 
St. Clair, August 21, 1953. 

To Mary Marton Davenport, a son, George 
Wesley, June 12, 1953. 

To Debby Voss Howard, a daughter, 
Kathleen Ann, December 21, 1952. Debby 's 
husband is at the Peter Bent Brigham Hos- 
pital this year. 

1949 

Elinor Bozyan received a B.A. degree 
from Wellesley in June, and majored in 
Music Theory. She is planning to spend a 
year in England attending lectures at Ox- 
ford. 

Mackie Davis received a B.A. degree 
from Vassar in June. She spent the summer 
traveling in Europe with two college class- 
mates. 

Darlene Gibbons received a B.A. degree 
from Pembroke in June. 

Sally Gibbs received a B.A. degree from 
Wellesley, and majored in Political Science. 
She is taking an executive training course in 
New York this fall. 

Barbara Hamby received an A.B. degree 
in Child Study from Vassar. She is now 
studying for her master's degree at Columbia 
Teachers College. 

Pam Maddux spent the summer in Europe. 

Elly Massie Stalford received a B.A. degree 
from Smith, and majored in Sociology. Her 
husband will be in the Marines for another 
year and a half. 

Libby Merrick received a B.A. from Vas- 
sar in June as a History of Art major. She 



traveled in Europe this summer, and expects 
to stay in London for six months as honor- 
ary attache at the Tate Gallery. 

Sally Nesbitt received a B.A. degree from 
Wesleyan in June. She took some shorthand 
and typing courses this summer, and is now 
working for the University of Chicago. 

Nancy Newhall received a B.A. degree 
from Mary Washington College in June. 
She majored in Sociology. She took courses 
in Sociology and Psychology at the Univer- 
sity of Virginia last summer. She is now 
studying to be a nurse at Columbia's Presby- 
terian Hospital. 

Jane Noss received a B.A. degree from 
Oberlin in June. 

Joanna Parks received a B.A. degree 
from Sweet Briar and majored in Political 
Economy. She is attending Katharine Gibbs 
in Boston this fall and would love to see any 
"forty-niners" who are also in Boston. 

Esther Peirce received her A.B. degree in 
Arts and Sciences at McGill in May. She 
started her nurses' training course at the 
Royal Victoria Hospital September 1 . 

Penny Pendleton received the degree of 
B.A. in Architectural Sciences from Rad- 
cliffe cum laude. She has finished her first 
year of work at the Harvard Graduate 
School of Design, and in 2^ years will re- 
ceive a professional degree in Architecture. 

Carole Quigg received a B.A. degree in 
Economics from Pomona in June, and spent 
six weeks in Europe this summer. 

Camilla Titcomb received an A.B. degree 
from Jackson in June, and is teaching at the 
Annie Wright Seminary in Tacoma, Wash., 
this year. 

Joan Webster received a B.A. degree from 
Vassar in June. She majored in English. She 
spent the summer traveling in Europe with 
her family. 

Jane Woolverton is working for the govern- 
ment in Washington. 

Engaged 

Anne Mansfield to William D. Borah of 
Needham, Mass. Anne received a B.A. de- 
gree from Wellesley in June, and majored in 
History of Art. Mr. Borah is an alumnus 
of Harvard, and served in the Navy during 
World War II. He is with the New York 
Life Insurance Co. 

Anne E. Miskell to Lt. Joseph Forand, 
U.S.A., of New Bedford. Lt. Forand was 
graduated from Norwich University. He is 



34 



now serving as an instructor at Fort Knox, 
Ky. 

Married 

Barbara Backes to Lawrence Douglass 
North, a graduate of the Taft School and 
Brown. Barbara received her A.B. degree 
from Smith in June and majored in Eco- 
nomics. 

Nancy Cowles to William Heath Black, 
June 19, 1953, in Princeton, N.J. 

Anne Beresford Dartt to William Ronald 
Leverich of Plandome, N. Y., September 12, 
1953, in Cold Spring Harbor, N. Y. Frede- 
ricka Brown was maid of honor. Mr. Leve- 
rich is a senior at Colgate University in the 
Air Force R.O.T.C. program. 

Barbara Dow to Donald R. Freeman, 
April 18, 1953, in Washington, D. C. 

Faith Johnson to Henry Sudler Beard, 
Jr., June 13, 1953. Mr. Beard is a graduate 
of Annapolis and Cornell Law School. He is 
with the Northwestern Gas Transmission 
Company in Springfield, Mass. 

Madelon Olney to M. Robert Paglee of 
Wilmette, Illinois, April 25, 1953, in St. 
Peter's Cathedral in Rome. Their honey- 
moon was spent on the island of Majorca, off 
the coast of Spain. 

Joan Oven to David Haynes Betts, June 
28, 1953. Pat Bleecker was one of the 
bridesmaids. Joan graduated from Sarah 
Lawrence in May. 

Nancy Rogal to Dr. Albert Cohen, Octo- 
ber 5, 1953, in Belmont, Mass. Nancy gradu- 
ated from the Simmons School of Library 
Science in June with a B.A. degree. She is 
assistant children's librarian at the Boston 
Public Library. Dr. Cohen is a pediatrician. 

Judith Wendy Scott to John McPherson 
Scott of Montreal, September 12, 1953, in 
Ste. Anne de Bellevue, Canada. Wendy re- 
ceived her B.A. degree from McGill in June. 
Mr. Scott is a graduate of McGill, and is 
working for the Montreal Gazette. 

Deborah Williams to R. Wallace Troem- 
ner, Jr., June 24, 1953, in Philadelphia. 
Debby received a B.A. degree from Smith in 
June. Mr. Troemner was graduated from 
Yale in June, and was commissioned a 
Second Lieutenant in the Air Force. He re- 
ported for duty in September, and expects 
to go to the Far East. Debby hopes to join 
him there in a few months. 

1950 

Noelle Blackmer is president of her 
dormitory at Radcliffe. 



Engaged 

Carol Bernstein to Robert Leslie Horo- 
witz of Brockton. Mr. Horowitz was gradu- 
ated from the Chauncy Hall School and 
M.I.T. 

Jane Gafill to Reginald Finch Towner, 
Jr., of Essex Fells, N. J. Mr. Towner was 
graduated from Governor Dummer Acade- 
my, and is a senior at Amherst College. 

V. Ann Merriwether to Leslie Benjamin 
Disharoon of Paoli, Pa. Mr. Disharoon is a 
senior at Brown University. 

Married 

Mary E. Bixby to David M. Lamb of 
Andover, August 22, 1953, in Haverhill, 
Mass. Jane Gafill and Margaret Lurton 
were bridesmaids. Elizabeth Bradley and 
Roberta Ann Gibbon Coates were honorary 
bridesmaids. Mr. Lamb is a graduate of the 
Peddie School and Yale. Mary will return 
to Smith this fall. 

Anne Dunsford to Eastham Hockmeyer, 
June 17, 1953, in Chelmsford, Mass. Lee 
Flather Edwards was matron of honor. 

Roberta Ann Gibbon to Neligh Coates, 
Jr., January 10, 1953, in Evanston, 111. 

Georgette Davis to Giovanni Ferrante di 
Ruffano of Rome, Italy, September 5, 1953, 
in Glenville, Conn. Julie Holt and Mary 
Macy Wheeler were bridesmaids. Mr. Fer- 
rante was graduated from Belmont (N. C.) 
Abbey College and Stevens Institute of 
Technology with a degree in Mechanical 
Engineering. 

Marilyn Jaspert to Frederick William 
Guardabassi of Pride's Crossing, Mass., 
September 1, 1953, in Andover. Mr. Guarda- 
bassi attended St. George's School, was 
graduated from Harvard, and attended the 
School of Foreign Service at Georgetown 
University. 

Sarah Marian Stevens to William Duncan 
MacMillan, II, September 26, 1953. Anne 
Dunsford Hockmeyer and Alice Russell were 
bridesmaids. Mr. MacMillan attended the 
Berkshire School, and graduated from Brown. 
He is associated with Cargill, Inc., Minn. 

Born 

To Lee Flather Edwards, a daughter, 
Katherine, April 10, 1953. 

To Helen Sinclaire Blythe, a son, Sinclaire 
Whitman, March 2, 1953. 

To Lucy Wright Case, a son, Robert Solo- 
mon Wright, March 26, 1953. 



35 



Thank You! 

The Address Department wish- 
es to say "Thank you" to all those 
who responded to its request for 
information regarding lost alum- 
nae. We did hope to thank each 
one personally, but we were un- 
able to keep up with all the re- 
plies which were received. We do, 
however, want you to know your 
kindness is greatly appreciated. 



1951 

Ann Bovard is studying at Knox College, 
and is majoring in Spanish. 

Marcia Crane was a member of the May 
Court at Randolph-Macon Woman's Col- 
lege. She has transferred to the University of 
North Carolina this year. 

Barbara Gibson spent two months in 
Texas last summer. She attended the Uni- 
versity of Texas taking courses in Govern- 
ment and Contemporary Drama. She is on 
the committee for the Junior Show to be 
given at Wellesley, October 24. Barbara is 
assistant chorister of the Wellesley College 
choir, and vice-president of the French club. 

Joan Godfrey is assistant dietitian at the 
Middlesex Sanatorium in Waltham, Mass. 
Joan graduated from Lasell Junior College 
in June with an Associate in Science degree. 

Minola Habsburg is concentrating on 
study in the Art Department at Vassar. She 
was a guest at the coronation of Queen 
Elizabeth. 

Susan Kimball sang a duet in Town Hall 
in New York when the Vassar Glee Club 
gave a joint concert with Columbia. 

Joan Morrison is in training at the New 
England Baptist Hospital. 

Doane Randall has transferred to the 
University of North Carolina. 



Georgia Stanley graduated in June from 
Westbrook Junior College with an Associate 
in Arts degree. 

Faith Taylor Harwood has a year-old son, 
Timothy Bartlett. Her husband is studying 
at Princeton, and expects to attend Harvard 
Business School. 

Martha Warner has transferred to Con- 
necticut College. 

Engaged 
Alison Faulk to Ensign Charles F. Curtis 
of Hamden, Conn. Her fiance was graduated 
from Hopkins School and Dartmouth Col- 
lege, class of 1952. 

Married 
Constance Hall to Benneville Noyes Stro- 
hecker, September 19, 1953, in Utica, N. Y. 
Dorthea Hall Kernan was matron of honor. 
Mr. Strohecker was graduated from Penn- 
sylvania State College, and served in the 
Army in France in World War II. 

1952 

Karen Larson has transferred to the Uni- 
versity of Colorado. 

Nancy Penwell is studying at the Kath- 
arine Gibbs School in Boston. 

Betsy Waskowitz had polio this summer, 
and will not return to Mt. Holyoke this fall. 

Engaged 
Barbara Nichols to William Gustave Kurth 
of Andover. Mr. Kurth is a graduate of 
Tabor Academy, and is a senior at Bowdoin 
College. 

Married 

Jane Edwards to Eugene Edward Hol- 
brook, July 9, 1953, in Nashua, Iowa. 

Clara E. Reynolds to Joseph Benjamin 
Palmer, May 9, 1953, in Center Ossipee, 
N. H. 

1953 

Elizabeth Bravinder is studying at Mount 
Holyoke this year. 



Past Faculty 

Miss Barbara Humes was married to Alexander Euston of Pittsfield on 
June 24. Miss Marguerite Jupp was married to Edward Sainati, September 
12. Mrs. Rohrbach is teaching at St. Catherine's School in Richmond, Va. 
Miss Roth is teaching at Stuart Hall in Staunton, Va. 



36 



WUaA New? 



Your address? Your work? Your babies? Your trips? 

Send word of your activities to the Alumnae Office, Abbot Academy, 
Andover, Mass., before January 15, 1954. 



Today's date 

Maiden Name Class . , 

Married Name 

Address 

Postal Zone 











Sent by the School to all Abbot Girls 




Abbot Academy Bulletin 

February 1954 



ABBOT ACADEMY BULLETIN 



Series 21 



FEBRUARY, 1954 



Issue 2 



Abbot Academy Alumnae Association 

Associate Member of the American Alumni Council 



President 
Miss Irene Atwood 
180 Commonwealth Ave. 
Boston 16, Mass. 

Vice-presidents 
Mrs. Edmund W. Nutting 
(Mary Howard) 
21 Wave Ave. 
Wakefield, Mass. 

Mrs. Lenert W. Henry 
(Helen Allen) 
25 Irving Street 
Hingham, Mass. 

Mrs. A. Lawrence Van Wart 
(Betty Weaver) 
160 Melrose Place 
Ridgewood, N. J. 



OFFICERS— 1952-1954 

Clerk 

Mrs. Theodore Atkinson 
(Jane Holt) 
8 Chestnut Street 
Winchester, Mass. 

Treasurer 
Mrs. Ernest L. Wilkinson 
(Helen Knight) 
Alden Road 
Andover, Mass. 

General Secretary 
Miss C. Jane Sullivan 
97 Knox Street 
Lawrence, Mass. 



Alumnae Trustees 
1948-1954 
Miss Jane Baldwin 
140 East 28th Street 
New York, New York 

1951-1957 
Mrs. H. Guyford Stever 
(Louise Risley) 
36 Fairmont Street 
Belmont, Mass. 



ABBOT CLUB PRESIDENTS 



BOSTON 
Mrs. Robert H. Marsh 
(Dorothy Beeley) 
32 Williams Road 
Lexington 73, Mass. 

CHICAGO 

Mrs. Floyd Shumway 

(Margaret Rabling) 

815 East Deerpath 

Lake Forest, Illinois 

CONNECTICUT 
Mrs. Donald Hoggson 
(Gertrude Drummond) 
R.F.D. 
Lakeville, Conn. 

DETROIT 

Mrs. Howard H. Fitzgerald 
(Jean Craig) 
19091 Bedford Road 
Birmingham, Michigan 



MAINE, EASTERN 
Mrs. Richard Roberts 
(Dorothy Spear) 
Payson Road 
Falmouth Foreside, Maine 

MAINE, WESTERN 

Mrs. Frank N. Wells 
(Louise Houghton) 
32 Ship Channel Road 
South Portland, Maine 

NEW YORK 

President 
Mrs. Lucien R. Tharaud 
(Cynthia James) 
17 East 96th Street 
New York 28, N. Y. 



OHIO, CENTRAL 
Mrs. John B. Gager 
(Thelma Mazey) 
228 N. Drexel Avenue 
Columbus 9, Ohio 

OHIO, CLEVELAND 

Mrs. Edward F. Little 
(Nancy Baylor) 
1407 Commonwealth Avenue 
Mayfield Heights 
Cleveland 24, Ohio 

OLD COLONY 
Mrs. Oscar M. Finger 
(Martha Wind) 
8 Belcher Avenue 
Brockton, Mass. 



THE EDITORIAL BOARD 

Jane B. Carpenter, 1892, honorary 
Constance Parker Chipman, 1906, honorary 
C.Jane Sullivan, 1931, Editor-in-Chief 
Irene Atwood, 1918, ex officio 



Published four times yearly, October, February, May, and September, by Abbot Acad- 
emy, Andover, Massachusetts. 

Entered as second class matter December 12, 1933, at the post office at Andover, Mass- 
achusetts, under the act of August 24, 191 2. 



A tf-eujL Wosidi puun Mill JleaMey 

x\_LTHOUGH Christmas will seem a long way in the past 
when this issue of the Bulletin comes out, I should like to ex- 
press to all the old girls from whom I received Christmas 
greetings the pleasure these messages gave me. It is heart- 
warming to hear from girls of many "generations" and I al- 
ways enjoy the photographs of the children and the bits of 
news that I receive. The greetings come literally from all over 
the world and it is fascinating to imagine the far flung lines 
that radiate from Abbot. This year messages come from Guam 
and from Africa and many a country and state between, and 
it is interesting to realize that the sun never sets on Abbot ! 

This spring, on the May week end following the 125th an- 
niversary of the opening of the school, I hope that we shall 
have a delightful homecoming of old girls from near and far. 
In this unstable, unpredictable world, it is steadying even to 
think of the continuity and comparatively unchanged reality 
of our school, but to return and walk the old familiar paths 
under the old maple trees or the great oaks, and to sit in Abbot 
Hall where thousands of girls have "consecrated life to the 
best", must bring renewed strength of spirit as well as hours 
of warm companionship. It will give me and all of us of today's 
Abbot great pleasure to share with you the joy and inspiration 
of the young of this generation. Make your plans now for this 
"pilgrimage" ! 



Abbot's 125th Birthday 

May 7-9, 1954 

Program 

FRIDAY— MAY 7 
6:00 p.m. Dinner at Abbot. Student speakers 

7:30 p.m. Modern Dance Recital 

SATURDAY— MAY 8 

8:30 a.m. Breakfast at Abbot 

10:30 a.m. Alumnae Association Annual Meeting 

1 :oo p.m. Class Reunion Luncheons at Levaggi's, North Reading 

2:30 p.m. Bazaar 

6:30 p.m. Banquet at Abbot. Entertaining program 

8:30 p.m. Distinguished speaker 

SUNDAY— MAY 9 

9:00 a.m. Breakfast at Abbot 

10:00 a.m. Service in the Chapel 

An exhibition of the paintings, drawings, and creative works of Abbot 
alumnae will be shown in the John Esther Art Gallery. Please send some rep- 
resentative examples of your work for this exhibition. Please let the Alumnae 
Office know soon what you will send, and arrange to have it reach Andover 
by April 25. 

The Alumnae Office takes care of reservations for rooms and meals at 
the school, and will send a reservation blank to you April 1 . 

The school will entertain the alumnae for all meals except luncheon 
Saturday noon. Arrangements have been made to hold all class reunion 
luncheons on Saturday at Levaggi's in North Reading on Route 28, five 
miles from Abbot. The luncheon will be S3. 00 including tax and tip. Reserva- 
tions for this luncheon will be made through your reunion chairman. 



Abbot Graduate in Nursing 

The Jimmy Fund 

Nancy Harrison, 1940 
Head Nurse at Jimmy Fund Clinic 

When asked to write about my work in the Jimmy Fund Building, an 
institution for the research and care of children with various kinds of cancer, I 
knew it would be difficult because of the varied number of things we do in 
the course of a day, so I shall combine it with a brief description of the build- 
ing and its function. 

The Jimmy Fund was founded in 1948 to help fight cancer in children. 
The building was opened in 1 952 and greatly added to the facility of caring 
for these children. The previous quarters of the clinic were on the first floor 
of an old apartment house, and a far cry from our present clinic. The new 
building has five floors in all, four of which are devoted to laboratories for 
cancer research and the fifth is the clinic floor, devoted entirely to the care of 
the children except when hospital admission is indicated. In the latter case 
they are admitted to the Children's Hospital where we have an entire floor 
for our patients. 

The clinic floor is designed solely for the children, thus making their 
visits as pleasant as possible. The main lobby has an electric train, television 
set and Merry-go-round, the latter being operated manually by some unsus- 
pecting parent. The entire length of the corridor has the story of Pinocchio 
done in murals. A smaller waiting room has the story of Snow White and the 
Seven Dwarfs around its walls plus many books and exciting toys. 

The examining rooms and the room where blood transfusions are given, 
each have a story on their walls and the transfusion room has a television 
set and record player, which makes a transfusion a little more bearable and 
pleasant. 

The chief functions of another nurse and myself in the clinic are many 
and varied. One of us runs the clinic which consists of getting the patient's 
chart and the patient ready to be seen by a doctor, assisting the doctor in any 
way possible and giving the patient the necessary drugs and instructions until 
the next visit. Because over half our patients have leukemia, they require 
frequent blood transfusions which are set up by us and, after they have been 
infused by a doctor, are watched and removed by us at the end of a few hours. 

We see about 20 patients daily and the amount of work we do depends 
entirely on the condition of the children. Some days we have 3-4 transfusions 
plus other treatments which keep us very busy, and on other days we have 
routine examinations with no treatments which leaves us time for the never 
ending cleaning, reports and many other tasks which go with most any type 
of work. 



Many people ask me how I can work in a place such as the JimmyFund 
Building. They think it would be depressing and dissatisfying because all the 
children have a fatal disease. It is neither depressing nor dissatisfying because 
these children and their parents are such a wonderful group of people. Even 
after we have lost a child many of the parents come back to see us and help 
others face the same problem. With the drugs the children get they feel very 
well a good part of the time, varying of course, with the individual. Many of 
them continue to go to school and to play as any normal child would do. To 
come into the clinic on any day, you would be amazed to see the majority of 
the children playing as they do in any kindergarten, taking their whole clinic 
visit as a matter of course. If I should line a group of children up and ask you 
to pick out the sick ones, you would probably not be able to do it. 

The drugs used for this disease have done a great deal toward allaying 
the growth of the tumor cells, thus enabling the children to live more normal, 
happier and longer lives. If this much can be done, we can't help but think 
the day will come when cancer can be erased altogether. 



Club News 

Boston 

The joint meeting of the Boston Abbot Club and the Alumnae Associa- 
tion was held at the Junior League, February 6, 1954, at 1 p.m. Miss Hearsey 
brought greetings from the school, and Miss Louise Coffin of the Science De- 
partment showed slides of her year at Harrogate College as an exchange 
teacher. Dorothy Beeley Marsh '25 and her String Quartet played several 
selections. 

Eastern Maine 

It was incorrectly reported in the October Bulletin that there was a 
meeting of this group last summer. 

New York 

The annual meeting will be held March 6, 1954, at Schrafft's at 12:30 
p.m. Mademoiselle Arosa of the French Department will entertain with mono- 
logues. Call Mrs. Lucien Tharaud, 1 7 East 96th Street, New York, for further 
details. 



Faculty in Foreign Fields 

A Year in Britain 

Louise Coffin 
Exchange Teacher, 1952-igjj 

The idea of going to Yorkshire as an exchange teacher came as quite a 
surprise when Miss Hearsey suggested it in the early spring of 1952. I may 
have accepted with a little hesitation, but now that I have returned after my 
year at Harrogate, I can report with no hesitation at all that I loved it, and 
also that I am happy to be back at Abbot. In spite of the social distractions, 
week ends, calling hour, football games, etc., the Abbot girls seem to be able 
to work more independently and with less prodding by teachers than many of 
the Harrogate students. The English girls are tremendously friendly and 
most anxious to hear all about life in the States, and about what their Ameri- 
can contemporaries are like, especially about our sports, our clothes, and our 
television. The other teachers (referred to as Staff not Faculty) were also a 
most friendly group, who accepted the stranger with great kindness. I lived 
in a Staff House with twelve other teachers, and this was pleasant, but I did 
miss the contact with the girls outside of class hours. 

At Christmas time we had a whole month's vacation, and after carol 
service at school, and a party highlighted by the entrance of a real boar's 
head carried in procession, and climaxed by the appearance of Father Christ- 
mas himself, I went down to London. I felt so instantly at home there that I 
enjoyed a couple of weeks doing all the things that one is supposed to do in 
London in the holidays. I took in circuses and the zoo, went to a pantomime, 
sang carols around the great Christmas tree in Trafalgar Square on Christ- 
mas eve, and saw "Peter Pan" — also went sightseeing. In January I was 
entertained for a week in Andover, Hampshire, by members of the Business 
and Professional Women's Clubs. Then there was time for a short visit at 
Bath with Miss Dorothy Baker. 

In England, one does not talk of the "Winter" term. It is "Spring" 
term as soon as you return to school in the middle of January. This name is 
not as misplaced as it would seem here — for in February you can feel the 
spring coming, and the birds sing madly and there are fields of yellow prim- 
roses and wild bluebells. Mother came over to be with me for my month's 
vacation in April. We had a bus tour of Devon and Cornwall, and time for 
short trips to Cambridge, Oxford, and Canterbury. At Coronation time we 
had a week's holiday and I was in Berkhamsted at Ashridge, an adult educa- 
tion college just north of London. Here, in a magnificent setting, 100 of us 
from all parts of the Commonwealth heard lectures on Parliament, the Com- 
monwealth, the Monarchy, and the Coronation. Buses took us sightseeing to 
Stratford-on-Avon, Warwick castle, and Sulgrave Manor. On the day of the 
Coronation I had a fine view of the procession from a very wet cold pave- 



Actors at Alnwick 

Emily Hale 
Department of Drama and Speech 

For a week last summer I was a student in the British Drama League 
Summer School for actors and directors, or as the English say, "on the course" 
at Alnwick Castle, Alnwick, Northumberland. (Omit the L and the W in the 
pronunciation of the name and you will be as locally correct as you please.) 

Each summer the League, a national organization interested in and pro- 
moting the best in the dramatic arts among professionals and amateurs, 
leases, for a long or shorter period, a large house and property to care for this 
summer school of some fifty men and women; in finding as unusual and at- 
tractive properties as possible, the League furnishes a holiday as well as in- 
struction to its members, at a very modest fee. 

Alnwick Castle has been, and still is, the residence of the Dukes of North- 
umberland, and is so vast that the present Duke may rent part of the castle 
winter and summer, while living in his own apartments, which in themselves 
form quarters as cosy as half of Draper Hall. The wings of the castle in which 
we were resident for a week were rather formidable, chilly, very extensive 
and a veritable labyrinth of residence and class rooms. Bewildered, as well as 
thrilled, were we all in learning our way around and becoming accustomed to 



ment in Regent Street by Piccadilly Circus. In the evening we saw the illumin- 
ations and fireworks from a launch on the Thames. It was truly a thrilling day 
altogether. 

School came to an end on July 22 with a great Speech Day celebration 
of the Diamond Jubilee of Harrogate College. For weeks the girls practiced 
and put on a fine mass gymnastics drill. There are no diplomas at such a 
speech day, but prizes are awarded for the best students in individual forms. 

The rest of the summer flew by all too quickly. Had first a look at Dublin 
and some of North Eastern Ireland. The country is truly green and lovely. It 
must be an artist's paradise. After this short time in Ireland, I went camping in 
Wales, seeing ancient castles and climbing Snowdon, the highest mountain. 
Then to Scotland for bus trips in Northwest and Southwest Highlands, end- 
ing up at the Edinburgh Festival for two weeks. The heather, acres of magni- 
ficent purple, the lakes and mountains, and the wild glens were desolate but 
wonderful. 

On my way to Southampton and home I had a short visit with Miss 
Tinker in York, and we exchanged enthusiastic comments on our year's 
adventures. We are both agreed that the exchange system for students and 
teachers alike is an extremely valuable and stimulating experience. More 
and more of these exchanges would be the surest way to bring real interna- j 
tional understanding and peace. 



castle as well as school routine. There was the long distance to cover between 
my tiny bed-room in one of the turrets, to the dining room, over 60 steps 
down. To reach my room at any time I climbed even higher than to my class 
room at the top of Draper. 

There were innumerable corridors, left and right turns, to memorize 
before reaching a destination for classes, and to find a classmate in off hours 
was like playing hare and hounds without a trail to guide one; the one com- 
fort was, in playing this impromptu game, that one always met others sur- 
prised and lost as oneself. There was the time allowance to learn to reach the 
Great Hall — a small riding arena in size, where general lectures and all 
classes in stage movement and pantomime were held. From the three walls, 
(the fourth was curtained, and held the small platform which served as our 
stage) looked down upon us the heads of all the wild game shot, I am 
sure, by countless Dukes of succeeding generations. Only the heat from your 
body as you exercised, kept you warm, and at the lectures even the English 
students brought extra wraps. And we were fortunate, too, in the weather; 
clear skies and sunshine each day but one. A tiny coal grate in my room piled 
high with fuel was not necessary but always cheerful. 

Classes were an hour or an hour and a half in length; rehearsals for the 
four one-act plays presented at the end of the week, were held each evening. 
The assignments were often very novel, difficult, but stimulating, because of 
the excellent teaching by the stafT of four instructors, two women, two men, 
and because of the marked ability of the students themselves; their quick 
grasp of characterization and criticism, and their lovely voices and diction 
delighted me daily. I was the only American among the group and could not 
have received a friendlier more courteous welcome and consideration from 
staff and students alike. I chose production, acting and choral speaking for my 
special study and had the extreme pleasure of taking a small part in one of 
the plays. On the tiny make-shift stage we huddled like sheep waiting our 
cues: there would have been no room for Mr. Robb, and offstage noises were 
almost a literal interpretation of the name. But the excellence of the plays, 
memorized faultlessly in the brief week and the skillful cheerful cooperation 
of every one assisting, was a lesson in itself. 

We were given opportunity each day to do errands or sightseeing in the 
quaint rambling old town or to take trips farther afield ; I was given special 
permission to go to Edinburgh to be present at the "world premiere" of T. S. 
Eliot's new play "The Confidential Clerk". The school attended another per- 
formance. Martin Browne, the director of all Mr. Eliot's plays, came to 
Alnwick our final day to lecture on and discuss the play and Mr. Eliot. 

The great park, the river walks opposite the castle, the entrance over the 
old moat under the portcullis arch, the views from the narrow windows as I 
climbed to my turret cubicle, sunlight or moonlight enhancing the beauty of 
the Northumberland scene, flooding the towers, turfed courts and massive 
walls in an intense white light or blacking out a spreading archway, were all 
settings beyond compare for the leading "dramatis persona" of the Drama 
League School, ageless, compelling, many voiced, irresistible, Alnwick Castle 
itself. 



Class Fund Secretaries 

1953 Through 1954 

1892 Miss Jane B. Carpenter 

1893 Mrs. Norwin S. Bean {Elizabeth Nichols) 

1894 Mrs. Edgar G. Holt {Hanna Greene) 

1900 Mrs. Arthur P. Spear {Grace Chapman) 

1 90 1 Miss Helen Hale 

1902 Miss Honora Spalding 

1903 Mrs. R. Clyde Gerber {Margaret Wilson) 

1904 Mrs. John P. Dabney {Beatrice Gunter) 

1905 Mrs. William S. Knickerbocker {Frances W. Cutler) 

1906 Mrs. Reeve Chipman {Constance Parker) 

1907 Mrs. J. Edward Crowley {Marjory Bond) 

1908 Miss Mary Howell 

1909 Mrs. Ray W. Tobey {Edith Gardner) 

1 910 Mrs. Harold Hammond {Clarissa Hall) 

191 1 Mrs. Douglas Donald {Edith Johnson) 

191 3 Miss Cornelia W. Crittenden 

1914 Mrs. Lowell Sloan {Elsie Gleason) 

1 91 5 Mrs. Frederick S. Blodgett {Jessie Nye) 

1 91 6 Mrs. Richard C. Bartlett {Dorothy Pillsbury) 

1918 Mrs. George J. Cutler {Velma Rowell) 

1919 Mrs. Theodore M. Atkinson {Jane Holt) 

1920 Miss Louise Robinson 

1 92 1 Mrs. Richard K. Stover {Frances Gasser) 

1922 Mrs. Leslie B. Sanders, Jr. {Geneva Burr) 

1923 Mrs. John B. Durant {Ruth Holmes) 

1925 Mrs. Robert H. Marsh {Dorothy Beeley) 

1926 Miss Carlotta Sloper 

1927 Mrs. Irving Gramkow {Margaret Nay) 

1928 Mrs. Norman E. Sherwood {Jean Swihart) 

1929 Mrs. Rolfe M. Kennedy {Roberta Kendall) 

1930 Mrs. James F. Mathias (Barbara Lord) 

1 93 1 Mrs. Francis Holland (Barbara Graham) 

1932 Mrs. E. Kent Allen (Harriet Bolton) 

1933 Mrs. Frank P. Foster (Ethel Rogers) 

1934 Mrs. Sarah O. Loria {Sarah O'Reilly) 

1935 Mrs. Norman S. Lane (Cecile Van Peursem) 

1936 Mrs. Malcolm S. Loring {Anne Russell) 

1937 Mrs. Sydney P. Harrison (Jeannette Partridge) 

1938 Mrs. John C. Brown (Mary Elliot) 

1939 Mrs. John P. Pearson {Barbara Leland) 

1940 Miss Nancy Harrison 

1 941 Mrs. Bertram H. Roberts (Frances Troub) 

1 942 Miss Margaret McFarlin 

1943 Mrs. Robert P. Rudolph {Joyce Toffa) 

1944 Mrs. Edward M. Harris, Jr. {Marion Stevens) 

1945 Mrs. Charles W. Holzwarth (Shirley Sommer) 

1946 Mrs. Peter J. Blakney (Mary Burton) 

1947 Miss Sally Humason 

1948 Mrs. Thomas R. Stewart {Nancy Elliot) 

1949 Miss Patricia H. Bleecker 

1950 Miss Judith M. Lange 

1 95 1 Miss Carolin Furst 

1952 Miss Cornelia Hamilton 

1953 Miss Martha Gross 

Assistants; Miss Caroline Benedict and Miss Pamela Bushnell 



Abbot Second Century 
Alumnae Fund 

February r, 1954 

Total, $6200.19 
607 Contributors 

72 more contributors than last year's final total 
162 new contributors 



Leading Contributions 
by Class 

1 91 8 — $300 
1893 — $220 
1923—1179 
1926— $175 

1939— ^5 6 



Highest Number 


of Contributors 


1923- 


-28 


J933- 


-21 


J947- 


-19 


1916- 


-18 


1920- 


-17 


1922- 


-17 


! !93°- 


-17 



Highest Percentage 
of Contributors 

1 900 — 8 1 
1891—80 
1889—67 
1896—66 
1892—60 



A GUatofe 9* &eUuj, Made. 

What do you think about when you hear September mentioned? School, 
of course. 

What do you think about when you see girls starting off to school the 
first few weeks in September? Abbot, very likely. 

What will you be thinking about in September, 1 954? The Abbot Second 
Century Alumnae Fund. That's the change that is being made ! 

It has been decided to change the fiscal year of the Abbot Second 
Century Alumnae Fund so that it corresponds with the school year. Rather 
than have the Fund begin April 1st, as it has in the past, the Abbot Second 
Century Alumnae Fund will commence each year on Sept. 1st and end 
August 31st the following year. 

In order to make the change from one fiscal year to another the present 
1953-54 Fund will end at Abbot's 125th Birthday, May 7-9, 1954, rather than 
on March 31st as it formerly did. Any gifts received after the Birthday will be 
credited toward the new Fund appeal which will be sent out Sept. 1, 1954. 

What will you now think about when you hear September mentioned 
next time? The Abbot Second Century Alumnae Fund. For in order to go to 
a school like Abbot, scholarship help is needed. 

The Abbot Second Century Alumnae Fund is for Scholarships 

Mary Howard Nutting '40 

Alumnae Fund Chairman • 



List of Contributors 

April 1, 1953 — February 1, 1954 

fRegular contributor, 1949 thru 1953 

Percentages below class numerals indicate per cent of class 
contributing to Fund. 



1878 


1886 


33% 


25°/o 


"("Florence Swan 


Class of 1886 




"{"Mary Gorton Darling 


1880 


Margaret Redford Ready 


50% 




Harriet Smith Wilcox 


1887 




50% 


1883 


Lillian Cutter Porter 


20% 


Ida Jones Barter 


Stella Burdick Richardson 


•{"Harriet H. Thwing 



10 



1889 

67% 

Lilian Ellis Emerson 
f Flora Mason 
Edith Jackson Lewis 
Dora Mason McLaughlin 
f Alice Newton Judd 
f Annis Spencer Gilbert 
1890 

33% 
Sue Hertz Howard 



i8qi 

80% 
fAnnie Bull Hardenburgh 
f Caroline Goodell 
Harriet Hines Flack 
f Katherine Winegarner Spencer 

1892 

60% 
fjane B. Carpenter 
Fanny Gordon Bartlett 
f Josephine Rounsevel Coffin 

1893 

66% 
Class of 1893 
f Caddie Abbott Smith 
Amy Child s Rose 
Ann Ingalls 
Fannie Lewis Shattuck 
I Elizabeth Nichols Bean 
Belle Pearson Brooks 
Olive Slayton Evans 
Mary A. Thompson 

1894 

16% 
*Ida Cushing 
Hanna Greene Holt 
fMyra Hayes 

1895 

28% 

I Bessie Adams Tryon 
Charlotte Drury 
Kirty Eddy Shaw 
Blanche Hall Fuller 
■("Helen Muzzey 

1896 

29°/o 

[Isabel Chapin Gould 
j- Edith Magee 
fessie Ross Gibby 
("Eleanor Thomson Castle 
[" Betsey Whitaker Gooch 
Vlay Toung Duffy 

i897 

30°/ 

Dora Haley McDuffee 
7 rances Hinkley Quinby 
Lilian Miller Troutman 
Bessie Stow Twichell 
"Gertrude Ware Bunce 

1898 

52% 
Elizabeth Bousfield Ward 
>elina Cook Dunbar 

Contributed prior to death. 



Edith Fletcher 
Nellie Flint Rand 
Charlotte Hardy 
Lucy Hartwell Peck 
Harriet Lord 
jMabelle Norris Oakley 
Ethel Perley Tyler 
Annie Smart Angus 
fAmy Stork Kydd 

1899 

35°/o 
Helen Dana Porter 
Estelle Greenough Easton 
Lucy Hegeman Hubbell 
Lilian Mooers Smith 
Leila Virgin 
Harriet Wanning Frick 
f May Toung Cox 

1900 

8i°/ 
Frances Bixby Place 
Mary T. Carleton 
Grace Chapman Spear 
Leslie Crawford Hun 
Rose Day Keep 
Caroline Gowdy Venables 
Mildred Guild Marshall 
Constance Gutterson Taylor 
Carrie Harmon Shaw 
Ethel Hazen Lillard 
Gertrude McArdell Beatty 
f Lottie Redford 
f Mary Morgan Norwood 
Winifred Todd Mills 
Mary Tubman Taylor 
Alice Wood Hodgdon 
Mabelle Woodside Demack 

1901 

46°/o 
"f Frieda Billings Cushman 
f Ethel Brooks Scott 
Helen Buck 
f Evelyn Carter Giles 
Li Hie Dodge Brewster 
Emiiy Emerson Day 
Katherine French Rockwell 
Helen Hale 
f Delight Hall Gage 
Isabel Herrick Klous 
Faith Leonard Holden 
f Josephine Pope 

1902 

44°/o 
Harriett Chase Newell 
"("Mildred Chase Drake 



Florence Fletcher Preston 
Katherine Herrick Amos 
f Katherine King 
f Mildred Mooers Poore 
jHonora Spalding 

!9°3 

4i% 
Edith Burnham Roberts 
Jean David Blunt 
f Aletta Hegeman 
Nancy Holland Hubbard 
Helen Packard McBride 
Katharine Scott 
Olive Williams Parke 
Margaret Wilson Gerber 

1904 

54°/o 
Helen Abbott Allen 
Mayme Blair Hattersley 
Marion W. Cooper 
Sarah Field 
Helen French 
Beatrice Gunter Dabney 
Harriet Harmon 
Ruth Lane Treadway 
I Elizabeth Schneider 
Abbie Smith Taylor 
Mary Byers Smith 
Verta Smith Etz 
Julia Wallace Gage 

I9°5 

23% 
f Frances Cutler Knickerbocker 
Fanny Erving Arundale 
Fanny Hazen Ames 
Ruth Pringle 
Frances Tyer Crawford 

1906 

33% 
Helen Ellis Rice 
Louise Houghton Wells 
f Mary Jordan Goodrich 
f Evaline Korn Cookman 
Constance Parker Chipman 
jRena Porter Hastings 
Maud Sprague 

1907 

50% 
f Mabel Allen Buxton 
Violet Bates Wilkins 
Marjorie Bond Crowley 
Margaret Hall Walker 
Laura Howell 
Marion Lovering Linton 
Leonora Parsons Cooper 

II 



Maria Pillsbury Campbell 
fAnna May Richards Folsom 
Louise Richards Rollins 
Grace Spear Doble 
Alice Webster Brush 

1908 

47% 
I Helen Buss Towle 
Gertrude Caunt Barnes 
Jean Dascomb Higgins 
f A. Bertha Ewart 
Thirza Gay Hunt 
Edith Gutterson 
•j-Mary A. Howeil 
Winifred Ogden Lindley 
I Esther Parker Lovett 
Katherine Raymond Andrews 
Esther Stickwy Alley 
Dorothy Taylor 
Marion Towle Sturgis 
fRuth Van Vliet Fawcett 
Elizabeth Watts 

i9°9 

33°/o 
"f Edith Gardner Tobey 
Janet Gorton 
Marjorie Hills Allen 
Sarah T. Knox 
Louise Nor pell Meek 
Gladys Ferry Miller 
Helen Weber Mitchell 
"1" Frances Wright Kimball 

1910 

56% 
In memory of Mira Wilson 
| Clarissa Hall Hammond 
"j" Laura Jackson Austin 
Lillie Johnson Smith 
Ethel Kelsey Perry 
Persis Mclntire Downey 
fRuth Murray Moore 
|Ruth Newcomb 
Ethel Reigeluth Darby 
Edith Seccomb Young 
t Emily Silsby Morgan 
Gertrude Swanberg Cryan 
Louise Tuttle Abbott 

191 1 

40°/o 
f Dorothy Bigelow Arms 
Anna Boynton Hemenway 
fMarion Brown 
Borghild Hoff Lyman 
Miriam Howard Bushnell 
I Edith Johnson Donald 



Rebecca Newton Weedon 
j Frances Pray 
■f Henrietta Wiest Zaner 
f Jessie Wightman Jones 

1912 

20% 
"j" Hazel Goodrich Waugh 
Frances Lincoln Paige 
j Barbara Moore Pease 

i9!3 

37°/o 
Helen Bowman Janney 
Mildred Bryant Kussmaul 
f Cornelia Crittenden 
Helen Danjorth Prudden 
Olga Erickson Tucker 
f Gladys Estabrook Blanchard 
Alice Harsh 
Helen Hersey Heffernan 
Marion Parshley 
Dorothy Perkins Estabrook 
tMargaret Wilkins 

1914 

3i°/o 
Louise Albrecht Kenny 

t Harriett Bowman Meeker 

"j" Elsie Gleason Sloan 

Hildegarde Gutterson Smith 

Helen Hamblet Dyer 

Mary Harsh 

Emma Holt Garside 

Frances Jones Steinmetz 

Katharine Selden McDuffie 

Bertha Wessel 

Margaret Wylie Ware 

1915 

29°/o 
Elizabeth Allen Belknap 
jMarian Bayley Buchanan 
Marion Brooks 
Aurelia Hillman Sanders 
■fMattie Larrabee Whittemore 
Jessie Nye Blodgett 
Gertrude Shackle*on Hacker 
Marion Winklebleck Hess 

1916 

40% 
Vera Allen 
Ada Brewster Brooks 
f Charlotte Eaton 
Helene Hardy Bobst 
Dorothy Higgins Rand 
"[Mildred Jenkins Dalrymple 
Esther Kilton 
Louise King Childs 



f Dorothy Niles 
f Eugenia Parker 
| Dorothy Pillsbury Bartlett 
Alice Prescott Plumb 
f Helene Sands Brown 
Marion Selden Nash 
Emma Stohn Larrabee 
Esther Van Dervoort Howe 
Josephine Walker Woodman 
Elizabeth Wood Gage 

i9 J 7 

14% 
Miriam Bacon Chellis 
Mary Bartlett 
f Frances Cartland 
Cornelia Newcomb Lattin 
Cornelia Sargent Battershill 

1918 

25°/o 
"f" Irene Atwood 
j Louise Bacon Fuller 
Kathryn Cooper Richards 
fMarion Hubbard Craig 
Lucy Lane Church 
f Emmavail Luce Severinghaus 
Martha Miller Rees 
Katherine Pinckney Whistler 
Julie Sherman Tibbetts 
Helen Snow Vigue 
Margaret B. Speer 
Margaret Van Voorhis 
Virginia Vincent Phillips 

1919 
24°/o 
Kathryn Beck Dow 
Marea Blackford Fowler 
Gretchen Brown Knights 
Grace Francis Jenkins 
Elizabeth HaHel Coogan 
"fjane Holt Atkinson 
f Grace Kepner Noble 
Grace Leyser Boynton 
Gladys Merrill 
Elizabeth Newton King 
Marian Nichols Fiore 
Nadine Scovill Young 
"["Margaret Taylor Stainton 

1920 

30% 
Julia Abbe Ross 
Hope Allen Brown 
Edna Dixon Mansur 
Vivien Gowdy Larabee 
Lillian Grumman 
f Elizabeth Hawkes Miller 









12 



Hilda Heath Safford 
Katherine Kinney Hecox 
Marjorie Miles Jackson 
f Paulina Miller Patrick 
Muriel Moxley Hubbard 
fLouise Robinson 
Elizabeth Stewart Pieters 
Helen Thiel Gravengaard 
f Charlotte Vose Clark 
tBertha Worman Smith 
t Margaret Worman Thompson 

1921 

22% 
Charlotte Baldwin Frohock 
Ethel Dixon McGee 
Marion Kimball Bigelow 
Elizabeth McDougall Chandler 
Elizabeth McClcllan Stefani 
Margaret Neelands Parsons 
Mildred Peabody 
Elizabeth Thompson Winslow 
Frances Thompson Heely 
Henrietta Thompson Beal 
+ Eleanor Voorhees 
Mary Williams Cochran 

1922 

30% 
I Jane B. Baldwin 
f Gwendolyn Bloomfield Tillson 
Isabel Brown Crawford 
Geneva Burr Sanders 
Catherine Damon Mason 
BKatherine Damon Kletzien 
Dorothea Flagg Smith 
Barbara Goss 
Caroline Iredell 
fLois Kirkham Hart 
Mary Mallory Pattison 
Dorothy Moxley Pitman 
Margaret Potter Kensinger 
Eleanor Rose 
Alice Van Schmus Smith 
tSusana Welborn Osborn 
Dorothy Williams Davidson 

J 923 
53% 

Elizabeth Adams Ross 

f Nathalie Bartlett Farnsworth 

Martha Buttrick Rogers 

Edith Damon Bugbee 

Elizabeth Flagg Dow 

Anne Fry Schoener 

Ethel Goodwin Roberts 

Ruth Holmes Durant 

Emily Holt Mucklow 



Charlotte Hudson White 
Dorothy King Pitcher 
Laura Lakin Fleck 
Helga Lundin Buttrick 
Rosamond Martin Johnson 
Catharine Miller McCurdey 
Mary Newton Favor 
| Dolores Osborne Hall 
Natalie Page Neville 
Annetta Richards Bryant 
Mary Elizabeth Rudd 
Mary Scudder Lawrence 
Mary Swartwood Sinclaire 
Miriam Sweeney McArdle 
Dorothy Taylor Booth 
Elizabeth Thompson Henry 
Miriam Thompson Kimball 
Eleanor Warren 
f Esther Wood Peirce 

1924 

16% 

Polly Bullard Holden 
Dorothy Converse 
Caroline Hall Wason 
Margaret McKee De Yoe 
Olive Mitchell Roberts 
Elsie Phillips Marshall 
Constance Twichell 
Mary Elizabeth Ward 
Frances Williams MacCorkle 

1925 
19% 

Elizabeth Burtnett Horle 
Dorothy Beeley Marsh 
Elaine Boutwell von Weber 
Ruth Connolly Burke 
Ruth Davies Van Wagenen 
Frances Howard O'Brien 
I Eunice Huntsman 
Theodate Johnson Kloman 

1926 

24% 
Adelaide Black 
f Barbara Bloomfield Wood 
Anstiss Bowser Wagner 
| Katherine Clay Sawyer 
Ruth Farrington 
| Frances Flagg Sanborn 
Gracie Griffin Westman 
Edith Ireland Wood 
Suzanne Loizeaux 
Alice Perry 
Edda Renouf Gould 
Sylvea Shapleigh Smith 
Carlotta Sloper 



1927 
16% 

Helen Connolly McGuire 
Margaret Creelman Nelson 
Julia Cross Musk 
Persis Goodnow Brown 
Miriam Houdlette Walsh 
Pauline Humeston Carter 
Mary Knight Reeves 
Margaret Nay Gramkow 
Ruth Perry 

1928 

2I°/o 
Ruth Cushman Hill 
Lois Dunn 

f Virginia Gay d'Elseaux 
Elizabeth Hollis Sutton 
Louise Hyde Reilly 
f Beatrice Lane Mercer 
Mary Piper Sears 
Susan Ripley Ward 
Emily Sloper Shailer 

!929 

24°/o 
fLouise Anthony Castor 
Katherine Bhml Polsby 
f Catherine Bowden Barnes 
Barbara Folk Howe 
f Polly Francis Loesch 
Harriet Gilmore Yoh 
f M. Jeannette Hubbard 
Joyce Jarman McNamara 
Roberta Kendall Kennedy 
Estelle Levering Chestnut 
Mary Macdonald 
Dorothy Newcomb Rogers 
Despina Plakias 
Grace E. Stephens 

I930 

28% 
fRuth Baker Johnson 
Donna Brace Kroeck 
Elizabeth Brown Guild 
f Rosamond Castle Olivetti 
Hortense Dunbar 
Kathryn Dutton Leidy 
Alice Eckman Mason 
f Kathie Fellows Ingraham 
t Katharine Foster Rainbolt 
Evelyn Glidden 
t Alma Hill 
Barbara Lord Mathias 
Mary Jane Owsley Warwick 
Helen Ripley 
Eleanor Ritchie Brown 



J 3 



Vivian Southworth Gersteli 
Elizabeth Tarr Morse 

J 93i 

17% 
Doris Allen Carroll 
Emily Bullock 
f Nancy Can Holmes 
Faith Chipman Parker 
Barbara Graham Holland 
Carol Grosvenor Myers 
Margaret O'Leary White 
Mary Smead Homlar 
C. Jane Sullivan 

1932 

15% 
f Helen Allen Henry 
Virginia Brown Woods 
Helen Cutler Appleton 
Elizabeth Holihan Giblin 
Louise Hollis Black 
I Cynthia James Tharaud 
Elizabeth Piper Thornton 
t Eunice Randall 
Ruth Tyler Smith 

1933 

47% 
Margaret Black Manz 
Jane Burnham Curry 
Mary Burnham Gazlay 
Lois Chapman Greene 
f Margaret Chase Johnson 
Rozilla Chase Roberts 
Ann Cole Gannett 
Carolyn Guptill Hansen 
f Frances McGarry Ogg 
Kathleen Palmer Flynn 
Helen Rice Wiles 
Jane Ritchie Shaw 
Ethel Rogers Foster 
Clara Smith Clark 
Elizabeth Tompkins Madeley 
Mariatta Tower 
Margaret Walker 
Hazel Walters Klothe 
Betty Weaver Van Wart 
Martha Whipple Davis 
Martha Wind Finger 

1934 

15% 
Ann Byron Richtmyre 
Eleanor Harryman McQuarie 
Cassandra Kinsman Dexter 
I Carolyn Muzzy 
Ruth Stott Peters 



1935 

21% 
Anne Hurlburt Bradley 
Geraldine Johnson 
Elizabeth Kennedy Woodward 
f Elizabeth Morgan Foster 
Elizabeth Murphy Garrison 
Lucia Nunez Mason 
Shirley Powers Haseltine 
Katherine Scudder Fraser 
Shirley Smith King 
Eliese Strahl Cutler 
Cecile Van Peursem Lane 

1936 

14% 
Miriam Adams Preston 
Mary Dooley Bragg 
Grace Nichols Knight 
I Barbara Reinhart Livingston 
Pauline Spear Chapin 
Mary Trajton Simonds 

1937 

26% 
f Thelma Cutter Leuenberger 
Cynthia Holbrook Sumner 
Nancy Kincaid Vars 
Constance Knox 
Jeanette Nevius 
fjeannette Partridge Harrison 
Barbara Pierpont Craig 
Barbara Randolph Bowman 
Martha Ransom Tucker 
Louise Risley Stever 
Mary Jane Smith 
Martha Sweeney Read 
Joan Todd Wilkinson 

1938 

20% 
Jean Cross Maier 
Mary Elliot Brown 
Phyllis England Letts 
Rosa Fletcher Crocker 
Marian Lawson Archer 
Elizabeth McBride Chapman 
Anne Simpson White 
Constance Thurber Prudden 
Mary Toohey Kruse 
Beatrice Tyer Campbell 
Carol Whittemore Fellows 

1939 

35% 
Barbara Bellows Kaiser 
Lucia Buchanan Livingston 
Olive Butler 
Nancy England Worthen 



Patricia Goss Rhodes 
Virginia Halstead Lightfoot 
Dorothy Heidrich Lockhart 
Barbara Leland Pearson 
Marjorie MacMullen Brewer 
Florence Mooney Doty 
Mary Murray Griffin 
Ann Oakman Deegan 
Lloyd Pierce Smith 
Adelle Sawyer Wood 

1940 

27% _ 
Joan Carlson Hutchison 
Suzanne Chadwick Bush 
Frances Chandler Futch 
f Mollie Chase Foster 
Phyllis Crocker England 
Barbara Fowler Borden 
Nancy Harrison 
fMary Howard Nutting 
Virginia Jones Garvan 
Margaret Meyer Haynes 
Marietta Meyer Ekberg 
Anne Rivinius Wild 
fMary Spaulding Powell 
Rachel Whitney Davis 
Gertrude Wind Schef't 
Nancy Wilson Ainslie 

I94i 
29% 
tjoan Belden McDonough 

Jeanne tte Biart Warren 
Miriam Colder Dunn 
Dorothy Fiske Winnette 
Nancy Gerrish MacFadyen 
Josephine Hartwell Boddington 
Doris Jones Hannegan 
Suzanne Long Wagner 
Emily Mills Courtice 
f Julie Nelson Williams 
Emily Ruth Poynter 
Jane Town? Johnston 
f Frances Troub Roberts 
Dorothy White Wicker 
Nancy Whitlier Atkinson 
Barbara Young Benner 

1942 

21% 
Irene Abbott MacPherson 
Mary L. Bertucio 
IJane Bishop 
Ethel Bolton Henderson 
Patricia Daniels Hanson 
f Beatrice Hardy Verdery 
Barbara Hill Kennedy 



14 



Janice Lenane Scott 
\ Marilyn Menschik Westaway 
Gretchen Roemer Gayton 
fane Rutherford 
•arbara Sanders Dadmun 
Ruth Snider Bernstein 
fMargaret Stuart Beale 
Elsie Williams Kehaya 

1943 
16% 

fMary A. Beckman Huidekoper 
elia Daves Kopald 
argaret Janssen Gray 
'atricia Pettengill Whitaker 
ean Replogle 
JBettye Rutherford McCouch 
Themis Sarris Ellis 
Constance Walker Thompson 
Isabel Wiggin McDuffie 
ft Joyce Yoffa Rudolph 

1944 

24°/o 

f Nancy Emerson Viele 
Elizabeth Frank Abeles 
t\agot Hinrichsen Cain 
Cynthia Holmes Spurr 
Vlarianna Hubbard Mercer 
f Ruth Kirsiein Turkanis 
Theresa Mastrangelo Mahoney 
Marion Stevens Harris 
UMscilla Stevens Rutherford 
(Margaret Travis Atwood 
Martha Watkins Curry 
Shirley Woodams Hoesterey 

1945 
16% 

Barbara Ball Bacon 
Esther Bufferd Watstein 
iPhyllis Hardon Gander 
Katharine Mulford 
Jessamine Patton Kennedy 
t f Cynthia Smith McFalls 
'Shirley Sommer Holzwarth 
iMary Taylor 
Beatrice Van Cleve 

1946 
18% 

Sally Allen Waugh 
iMary Burton Blakney 



Jenny Copeland Dufford 
Barbara Graf Robinson 
Frances Ann Little 
Luetta Robertson Kolflat 
Mary Thomas Peck 
f Nancy Thomas Whitcomb 
Deborah Wiggin Cameron 

1947 

3i°/o _ 
Lucy Dee Chivers Bixby 
Janice Cole 
Helen Dowd Richards 
f Virginia Eason 
Edith Flather 
Barbara French Brandt 
Corallie Hanly 
Sally M. Humason 
Carolyn McLean 
Margot Meyer 
Mary Louise Miller Hart 
fMartha Morse Abbot 
Susanne Robbins 
Maud Savage 
Nancy Scripture Garrison 
Darlene Sharp 
Geraldine Treadway Dampier 
Christine von Goeben 
Marion White Singleton 

1948 

20% 
tMartha Ball Geiken 
Anne Bergh Hull-Ryde 
Nadine Cookman Price 
Alicia Cooper Wright 
Barbara Dake Johnson 
Sue Davis Snyder 
Jane Kenah Dewey 
t Mary Marton Davenport 
Elizabeth Ogden Tod 
Mary Rich 
Ann Sarolea 
Barbara A. Sugar 
Eleanor Wallis 

1949 

Honor Banks MacLean 
Margaret Black Dintruff 
Elinor B. Bozyan 
Barbara Dow Freeman 
Nancy Jeffers "VVhittemore 
Joan Oven Betts 



1950 

20% 
Joan Aldrich 
Carol Bernstein 
Noelle Blackmer 
f Cynthia Faigle 
Beverley Flather Edwards 
Jane Ruth Gafill 
Julia Holt 

Dorothy Lampert Feigenbaum 
Mary Louise Lester 
Ann Merri wether 
Deborah Redfield 
Eleanor Thompson 

1951 

13% 
Ellen Chaplin 
f Sylvia Finger 
■fCarolin Furst 
| Paula Holden 
Virginia Hoyt 
Harriette McConnel 
f Marianne Slysz 
Georgia Stanley 
Shirley Young 

1952 

21% 
Martha Artz 
Joan Baird 
Lorna Ball 
Sally Binenkorb 
Jane Edwards Holbrook 
Elizabeth Garvey 
Persis Goodnow 
Connie Hamilton 
Ethel Kenah 
Ann Lyons 
Anne Merchant 
Kathryn Weinberg 

1953 
Antonia Gerald 

Past Faculty 
Helen Bean Juthe 
Barbara Humes Euston 

Trustees 
Burton S. Flagg 
Rev. Sidney Lovett 
Stoddard M. Stevens 

Clubs 

Boston 

Western Maine 



15 



Ml. tf-lcMffi dcufi: 



These gifts have been received or are in process: 

Ida Ellen Gushing 1894, late of Merrimac, Mass. Miss Cushing stipu- 
lated by Will that the sum of $200 be added to Abbot's Alumnae Scholarship 
Fund. 

$500 likewise was added to scholarship resources by a cash gift from Mr. 
Stephen Phillips of Salem, Mass. 

$100 came from Louise Haffner Fournier of Lawrence, Mass., who 
wished the sum assigned to the Scholarship Fund. 

Estate of Eliza A. Browne 1887. Abbot is a residuary legatee with nine 
other interests. It has already received $16792.92 without restriction as to use. 
Last month a final decree of distribution due to a Federal Tax refund pro- 
duced an additional sum of $902.19. 



Changes of Address Since October Bulletin 

Suggestion : Remove this list from the Bulletin, and attach it to 

your 1952 Register. 



1879 
Weeks, F. Adelaide 

6 No. Irving St., Arlington, Va. 

1884 
Leslie, Margaret Aff. 

Mrs. Frank M. Kendall 
162 Elm St., Montpelier, Vt. 

1887 
Wooster, Clara L. Aff. 

Mrs. G. Herbert Merrill 

92 Durand Rd., Maplewood, N. J. 

1894 
Draper, Charlotte Aff. 

Mrs. Arthur A. Brown 
Greystone Farm, Mentor, Ohio 

1899 
Hershey, Marie 

Mrs. Charles K. Bliss 

4640 Bonnybrae Dr., Yarrow Point, Bellevue, 
Wash. 

1902 
White, Helen C. Aff. 

Mrs. Walter F. Lawton 

1420 Bushwick Ave., Brooklyn 7, N. Y. 
1906 
Adams, Ruth 

Mrs. Guy W. Downer 

2822 4th Ave. West, Bradenton, Fla. 
Deeble, Elizabeth Aff. 

% Wells Fargo, Mexico, D.F., Mexico 
1909 
Elliott, Mildred W. Aff. 

Mrs. Harold A. Smith 

71 Walnut Hill Ave., Manchester, N. H. 
Morse, Jessie Aff. 

Mrs. Edward Raymond 

Box 1042, Palos Verdes Estates, Calif. 

16 



1911 
Copeland, Helen M. 

Mrs. James A. Creighton 
78 Union St., Hamburg, N. Y. 
Heys, Dora Aff. 

Mrs. Arthur F. Pym 
Ipswich Rd., Topsfield, Mass. 

1914 
Bartlett, Elisabeth P. 

Mrs. Frederick A. Jenks 

148 Main St., Rockport, Mass. 
Gens, Rosamond Aff. 

Mrs. Ferdinand Lehnert, Jr. 

6169 2nd Ave., North, St. Petersburg 2, Fla. 
Wylie, Margaret 

Mrs. Ralph L. Ware 

811 W. Wooster St., Bowling Green, Ohio 

1915 
Wilkey, Ada 

Mrs. E. Norman Bull 

1027 Washington Ave., Albany 6, N. Y. 

1917 
Atwood, Lucy R. 

Mrs. C. Freeman Olsen 

23 Madison St., Bangor, Me. 
Lane, Lucy Aff. 

Mrs. Oliver K. Church 

44 Arnold Way, West Hartford 7, Conn. 
Solle, Irene A. M. Aff. 

1042 Portole, Arcadia, Calif. 
Temple, Hilda B. 

Mrs. James W. LaMarque 

North Manursing Island, Rye, N. Y. 

1918 
Colbath, Virginia L. Aff. 

Mrs. Horace C. Crandall 
Wolfeboro, N. H. 



Cutting, Helen Aff. 

1015 Guilford Ave., Greensboro, N. C. 
Gray, Gertrude M. Aff. 

Mrs. Gertrude Davis 
16^ High St., Auburn, Me. 
Greenough, Mildred 

Mrs. Alvin L. Jensen 
1206 East Rockwood, Spokane 35, Wash. 
Vincent, Virginia 

Mrs. Burt G. Phillips 

245 East 17th St., New York 3, N. Y. 

1919 
Duckworth, Emily M. Aff. 

Mrs. Harvey Allen 

RD 2, Moscow, Pa. 
McCauley, Virginia E. 

Mrs. Courtland Otis 

136 East 79th St., New York, N. Y. 
Morse, Martha E. 

Wellington, Ohio 

1920 
Bailey, Eliza C. 

Mrs. Frederic F. Wright 

265 Noble Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Kinney, Katherine O. 

Mrs. John D. Hecox 

Van Wies Point, Glenmont, N. Y. 
Miles, Marjorie 

Mrs. Miles J. Jackson 

Fountain Hall, Mackinac Island, Mich. 
Winn, Ruth C. 

Mrs. Edward H. Newhall 

17 Swan Road, Winchester, Mass. 

1921 
Bulkeley, Elizabeth F. 

65 East Columbia, Detroit 1, Mich. 
Carr, Dorothy 

1038 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, Mass. 
Day, Margaret B. Aff. 

Mrs. Richard W. Suydam 

125 Gates, Apt. 14, Montclair, N. J. 
Foote, Margaret E. Aff. 

240 East Palisade Ave., Englewood, N. J. 
Knight, Katherine H. 

Mrs. Norman C. Fassett 

% Wisconsin School for Boys, Waukesha, Wis. 
Swan, Marion Ellen Aff. 

Mrs. Thomas O. Parnell 

1014 Union St., Manchester, N. H. 

1922 
Haskell, Juliet 

Mrs. Juliet H. Carrington 
Box 175, Clermont, Fla. 
Upton, Dorothy Aff. 

Mrs. Dorothy U. Knowles 

517 Sixth St., North, Great Falls, Mont. 

1923 
Lobenstine, Rose H. 

Mrs. Robert E. O'Bolger 

21 Arnold Pk., Rochester 7, N. Y. 
Miller, Catherine 

Mrs. Newton F. McCurdey 

3310 Alabama Ave., Alexandria, Va. 
Moon, Margery A. Aff. 

Mrs. R. L. Ziegfeld 

11 Richelieu Rd., Scarsdale, N. Y. 

1924 
Ireland, Eleanore A. 

Mrs. Frederick R. Saunders 

409 South Melcher St., Johnstown, N. Y. 
Judd, Melinda Aff. 

Mrs. Philip Fosburg 

924 Rambling Dr., Baltimore 28, Md. 
Wolfe, Marjorie L. 

Mrs. William F. Staples 

1371 Gardners Neck Rd., South Swansea, Mass. 

1925 
Hanna, Charlotte M. 

Mrs. George B. Beveridge 

399 Brentwood Drive, N.E., Atlanta.'Ga. 



Pritchard, Nettie Aff. 

Mrs. Norris W. Potter, Jr. 

1172 Kaneohe Bay Drive, Kaneohe, Oahu, T. H. 

1926 
Baker, Constance E. Aff. 

Mrs. Philip Churchill 
Atkinson, N. H. 
Bloomer, Helen F. Aff. 

701 South Grand Ave., Pasadena, Calif. 
Gibby, Rosalie Aff. 

Mrs. Yorke Markham 

236 No. Chestnut St., Westfield, N. J. 

1927 
Breese, Juliette B. Aff. 

Mrs. Harold C. Bennett 
P. O. Box 451, Islamorada, Fla. 
Farlow, Katherine M. 

Mrs. W. Spencer Hutchinson, Jr. 
1049 White Ave., Grand Junction, Colo. 
Spear, Dorothy 

Mrs. Richard J. Roberts 

Payson Rd., Rt. 99, Falmouth Foreside, Me. 

1928 
Leavitt, Helen E. 

Mrs. Ernest B. Fisher, Jr. 

American School of Oriental Research, Jerusalem 
via Amman, Hashemite, Jordan 
Swihart, Jean R. 

Mrs. Norman E. Sherwood 

1054 Lucky Ave., Menlo Park, Calif. 

1929 
Jones, Eleanor 

Mrs. George W. Bennett 
174 So. Orange Ave., So. Orange, N. J. 
Warren, Hersilia Aff. 

Mrs. Howard B. Durbin 

93 Putnam Park Ct., Greenwich, Conn. 

1930 
Atkinson, Louise 

Mrs. Reuben Dunsford 

15 No. Crossway, Lucas Point, Old Greenwich, 
Conn. 
Cowee, Elenita 

Mrs. Howell D. Chickering 

720 Morningside Rd., Ridgewood, N. J. 
Emlen, Mary Aff. 

Mrs. Mary E. Metz 

Lime Kiln Pike, Prospectville, Pa. 
Fellows, Kathie 

Mrs. Robert U. Ingraham 

31 Center St., Danvers, Mass. 
Gould, Cornelia B. 

Mrs. George V. Scott, Jr. 

7317 Three Chapt Road, Richmond 26, Va. 
Hadley, Grace B. 

Mrs. Richard V. MacMillan 

1353 Martin Drive, Wantagh, L. I., N. Y. 
Scheuer, Virginia Aff. 

Mrs. Virginia Blackburn 

General Delivery, Lovelock, Nev. 
Shepard, Mary T. 

Mrs. Henry S. Wiley 

Abbot Run Road, Rte 2, Box 415, Vatlev Falls, 
R. I. 

1931 
Chamberlin, Constance 

Mrs. Gordon F. Harris 

305 Kent Rd., Charlottesville, Va. 
Ireland, Catherine V. 

Mrs. George B. Lenz 

106 South Andrews Ave., Fort Lauderdale, Fla. 
Keith, Monica 

Mrs. Louis H. Langill 

135 Spruce St., Watertown, Mass. 
Welch, Dorothy 

Mrs. Charles E. Cyr 

229 Mt. Vernon St., Lawrence, Mass. 
1932 
Macfadden, Beverly Aff. 

Mrs. Roland Hebert 

847 Exposition Blvd., Los Angeles, Calif. 



17 



Mailey, Ruth L. 

200 14th St., Oakland , Calif. 
Nicholls, Virginia AflF. 

Mrs. Ferd de Anguera 
427 Theodore, Rockford, 111. 
Rockwell, Dorothy C. 

Mrs. Drexell C. Clark 

11705 College View Drive, Wheaton, Md. 

1933 
FitzHugh, Emily E. AflF. 

Mrs. Emilv F. Boone 

3529 Hertford Place, N.W., Washington 10, D. C. 
McDonald, Catherine 

225 Buckingham Way, Apt. 105, San Francisco 
27, Calif. 
Worth, Barbara 

Mrs. Bailey W. Brown 

17 Garden Ave., Bronxville, N. Y. 

1934 
Humphreys, Hope Aflf. 

Mrs. Archer W. P. Trench 

140 Power St., Providence, R. I. 
Stott, Ruth E. B. 

Mrs. Lovett C. Peters 

3244 Avalon Blvd., Houston 19, Tex. 

1935 
Burns, Cathleen 

Mrs. William B. Elmer 

113 Pinckney St., Boston 14, Mass. 
Harding, Phyllis 

Mrs. W. Heywood Morton 

616 Sydenham Ave., Westmount, P. Q., Canada 
Johnson, Geraldine 

34 Perkins St., West Newton, Mass. 
McDonald, Helen E. 

225 Buckingham Way, Apt. 105, San Francisco 
27, Calif. 
Madden, Cynthia 

Mrs. Donald L. Beebe 

Hartland Rd., West Granby, Conn. 
Nunez, Lucia 

Mrs. Nunez Mason 

204 Wardover Drive, Annapolis, Md. 

1936 
Holland, Clara M. 

Mrs. Elwood N. Chase, II 
905 Ridge Rd., Falls Church, Va. 
Robins, Anne M. 

Mrs. Wilfred R. Frank 

5200 Chestnut St., Bellaire, Tex. 

1937 
Caldwell, Janet AflF. 

518 Prospect, Seattle 9, Wash. 
Gage, Sally 

Mrs. Charles N. Curtis 

189 Hale St., Beverly, Mass. 
Inman, Elizabeth 

Mrs. Robert F. Kirkpatrick 

% Capt. R. F. Kirkpatrick A0583328, 852nd 
AC/W Sq. APO 334, San Francisco, Calif. 
Ransom, Martha R. 

Mrs. Arthur W. Tucker, Jr. 

25 Jefferson Rd., Chestnut Hill 67, Mass. 
Wilson, Mary P. AflF. 

Mrs. Daniel P. Brown 

2921 Morris Rd., Ardmore, Pa. 
Wonson, Priscilla B. AflF. 

Mrs. Clifford H. Hahn 

Bishop's Lane, Sherwood Forest, Lynnfield, Mass. 

1938 
Cross, Jean A. 

Mrs. William R. Maier 

East Court St., Doyletown, Pa. 
Dooley, Ann 

36 Central St., Andover, Mass. 
Duncan, Elise 

Mrs. Edward J. Boardman 

Stu. Det. Army Fin. School, Fort Benjamin 

Harrison, Ind. 



Flaherty, Ann 

Mrs. William R. Leathers 

805 West 61st St., Kansas City, Mo. 
Hauser, Doris deW. AflF. 

Mrs. Doris H. Williams 

22 West 14th St., Ocean City, N. J. 
Jewett, Elise AflF. 

Mrs. John T. Wilson, Jr. 

Old Mill Road, West Nyack, N. Y. 
McDonald, Elizabeth G. AflF. 

Mrs. John W. McCall 

81 Crestwood Drive, Daly City, Calif. 
Wilson, Betty Jean AflF. 

Mrs. Charles Galloway, Jr. 

Route 4, Box 111, Tucson, Ariz. 

1939 
Cross, Frances 

Mrs. Francis S. Jones 

2222 Fourth Ave., Big Stone Gap. Va. 
Daniels, Eleanor G. AflF. 

Mrs. Oswald Tower, Jr. 

1024 Unquowa Rd., Fairfield, Conn. 
Harris, E. Katharine 

College Apts., College Ave., Elmira, N. Y. 
Parker, Carol E. 

Mrs. John F. Humbert 

72 Hilltop Rd.. Levittown, N. Y. 
Perry, Patricia E. 

Mrs. Robert F. Braun 

1919 North 4th St., Sheboygan, Wis. 

1940 
Russ, Priscilla A. 

Mrs. John P. Shannon 

65 Edward St., Laconia, N. H. 

1941 
Cregg, Natalie A. AflF. 

Mrs. Emmett J. Ballard 

119 Oakside Ave., Methuen, Mass. 
Long, Suzanne M. 

Mrs. Long Wagner 

Milford, Pa. 
Waterhouse, Adeline B. N. 

Mrs. Philip MacKay 

12 West Oak Ave., Moorestown, N. J. 
White, Edith 

Mrs. Donald W. Bechtel 

1104 Franklin St., Melrose 76, Mass. 

1942 
Abbott, Irene P. 

Mrs. Kenneth P. MacPherson 

2 Ellis St., Quincy, Mass. 
Bates, Suzanne 

Mrs. Darwin W. Heath 

41 Nearwater Lane, Noroton, Conn. 
Curran, Annette L. AflF. 

Mrs. Arthur J. Conlon, Jr. 

49 Salem St., Andover, Mass. 
England, Betty Jean 

Mrs. Theodore A. Olsen 

3200 Shorewood Drive, Mercer Island, Wash. 
Estin, Helenty 

Mrs. Richard W. Homans 

16 Circuit Rd., Chestnut Hill, Mass. 
Goodman, Margaret E. 

Mrs. Edwin R. Decker 

Dept. M.E. & E. U. S. Militarv Academy, West 

Point, N. Y. 
Hill, Margaret 

Mrs. Harry Bell 

1943 Benecia Ave., Los Angeles 25, Calif. 
Lovett, Elizabeth McL. 

822 North Broadway, Baltimore 5, Md. 
Robjent, Barbara AflF. 

Mrs. Herbert P. Moore 

39 Linbrook Rd., West Hartford, Conn. 
Zeitung, Ann 

Mrs. Nathan Hale 

101 Blue Hills Rd., Amherst, Mass. 



18 



1943 
Hall, Sylvia Aff. 

Mrs. Dudley T. Colton, Jr. 

Washington Valley Rd., Martinsville, N. J. 
Howard, Margaret 

Mrs. Harry B. Long 

R. D. 1, Box 164-F, Edgewater, Md. 
Jacobus, R. Margaret 

Mrs. John R. Jaeckel 

% Haley Corp., Russ Bldg., San Francisco 4, Calif. 
McLain, Hilton 

Mrs. Harry D. Greer 

2008 "F" St., Vancouver, Wash. 
Olmick, Barbara L. \ IT. 

938-10 North, Seattle 2, Wash. 
Pierpont, Patricia E. Aff. 

Mrs. Richard W. Graves, Jr. 

1111^ South Garfield Ave., Alhambra, Calif. 
Scbubert, Jean 

Mrs. Richard C. Acford 

45 Bryant St., Springfield, Mass. 

1944 
Bertucio, Elizabeth J. 

Mrs. Michael M. Martuscello 

260-71-75th Ave., Floral Park, Glen Oaks, L. I., 
N. Y. 
Corkran, Anne C. Aff. 

Mrs. Clairborne R. McGee, Jr. 

Box 322. Lubbock, Tex. 
Calvin, Jacqueline 

Mrs. Warren W. Johnson 

700 Shepard Bush, Birmingham, Mich. 
Hinrichsen, Aagot 

Mrs. John E. Cain, Jr. 

21 Lantern Lane, Weston, Mass. 
Hubbard, Marianna 

Mrs. Jerry L. Mercer 

19670 Telbir Ave., Rocky River 16, Ohio 
Lange, M. Frederica 

Mrs. John P. Dempsey 

718 Hazel St., Louisville, Ky. 
Nicholas, Nancy 

Mrs. Harlan R. Wengert 

20 East Walnut St., Lebanon, Pa. 

1945 
Bufferd, Esther L. 

Mrs. Herbert Watstein 

235 Fern Hill Rd., Bristol, Conn. 
Clark, Pamela H. 

Mrs. Christopher C. Coyne 

23 Douglas Rd., New Canaan, Conn. 
Doyle, Betty Aff. 

5 Elizabeth St., Paterson, N. J. 
Doyle, Lois Aff. 

Mrs. Reuben Miller 

7442 South Drive, Chicago 49, 111. 
Gage, Julia 

Mrs. John W. Moses 

1124 Cordova St., Pasadena, Calif. 
Haserick, Barbara J. 

Mrs. Alan Johnson 

305 Crestone, Colorado Springs, Colo. 
Hodges, Helen 

Mrs. William S. Peppier, Jr. 

782 West End Ave., Apt. 72, New York, N. Y. 
Luce, Andree 

64 Oxford St., Cambridge, Mass. 
Marsh, Marion E. 

Mrs. James G. Birney 

2916 29th St., N.W., Washington, D. C. 
Mitchell, Janet 

Mrs. Burnell Poole, Jr. 

% Emerson, 52 Bowdoin St., Portland, Me. 
Patton, Jessamine R. 

Mrs. George D. Kennedy 

4 Pembroke Rd., Louisville, Ky. 
Sweeney, Joan 

64 Central St., Andover, Mass. 
Van Cleve, Beatrice 

605 East 82nd St., New York 28, N. Y. 



1946 
Clayton, Noma S. 

Mrs. Weston B. Flint 

27 Windsor Rd., Wellesley Hills 82, Mass. 
Noone, Cynthia C. 

31 Bartlet St., Andover, Mass. 
Olswang, E. Doris Aff. 

Mrs. Walter M. Wendelken 

411 South Ocean Ave., Freeport, N. Y. 
Peckett, Deborah Aff. 

141 Deepwood Drive, Hamden 14, Conn. 
Rairdon, Phyllis 

Mrs. James M. Wilce 

102 North Taylor, Kirkwood, Mo. 
Robertson, Luetta C. 

Mrs. Tor D. Kolflat 

112 East Wood St., West Lafayette, Ind. 
Thomas, Mary 

Mrs. Howard D. Peck 

2920 Hanson Drive, Charlotte, N. C. 

1947 
Campbell, Joanna 

Mrs. Weyman S. Crocker 

14 Currie Court, Ballston Spa, N. Y. 
Hemsath, Emily Aff. 

Mrs. Roger H. McElroy 

543 N. Gilbert St., Ada, Ohio 
Humason, Sally M. 

50 East 73 St., New York 21, N. Y. 
Kimball, Margaret G. 

Mrs. Robert L. Montgomery, Jr. 

12 Robinson St., Cambridge, Mass. 
Kinneman, Donna Catherine 

Mrs. Thomas J. Hasley 

500 South Linden Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Miller, Mary Louise Aff. 

Mrs. Reeves W. Hart, Jr. 

2167 Warrick St., East Gary, Ind. 
Mitchell, Elizabeth Ann 

315 Cedar Lane, Swarthmore, Pa. 
Treadway, Geraldine 

Mrs. William E. Dampier 

30 Park Drive, Chappaqua, N. Y. 
von Goeben, Christine W. 

3338 Prospect Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 

1948 
Ball, Martha G. 

Mrs. Harold J. Geiken 
1496-C Burke N.E., Grand Rapids, Mich. 
Cookman, Nadine T. 
Mrs. Raymond A. Price 

28 Beacon St., Fitchburg, Mass. 
Cooper, Alicia A. 

Mrs. Barry Wright, Jr. 

Mimosa Drive, Rome, Ga. 
England, Carolyn J. 

Mrs. Charles H. Wansker, Jr. 

26 Chauncy St., Apt. 4, Cambridge, Mass. 
Farrar, Mary 

2025 H St., N.W., Washington, D. C. 
Hellier, H. Louise 

428 East 58th St., New York 22, N. Y. 
Hildreth, Josephine W. 

% U. S. Embassy, Karachi, Pakistan 
Koines, Tina N. 

Box 532, North Falmouth, Mass. 
Lackey, Mary K. 

Mrs. Samuel C. Stowell 

113 Independence Dr., Hancock Village, Chest- 
nut Hill, Mass. 

Macartney, Sally Ann 

Mrs. William J. Osborn 

Notch Hill Road, North Branford, Conn. 
Sinclaire, Mary Carroll 

Mrs. James R. Morris, IV 

2007 E. Silvosa St., Tucson 9, Ariz. 
Voss, Deborah 

Mrs. Frank A. Howard 

128 Hemenway St., Apt. 2B, Boston, Mass. 



*9 



1949 
Black, Margaret A. 

Mrs. Richard P. Dintruff 

222 Westside Drive, Rochester 11, N. Y. 
Dow, Barbara E. 

Mrs. Donald C. Freeman 

3752 Flaherty Circle. Moanalua Ridge, Honolulu, 
T. H. 
Gibbs, Sally J. 

46 Riverside Drive, New York, N. Y. 
Gonzales, Charlotte L. 

Mrs. Peter R. Mann 

12229 Falkirk, Los Angeles 49, Calif. 
Mansfield, Anne M. 

Mrs. William D. Borah 

6445 North Broad St., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Massie, Elinor C. 

Mrs. John E. Stalford 

156 East 79th St., New York, N. Y. 
Newhall, Nancy 

179 Fort Washington Ave., New York 32, N. Y. 
Oven, Joan 

Mrs. David H. Betts 

530 Michigan, Evanston, 111. 
Peirce, Esther K. 

Nurses' Residence, Royal Victoria Hospital, 
Montreal, P.Q., Canada 
Scott, J. Wendy 

Mrs. John M. Scott 

3250 Ridgewood Ave., Apt. 8, Montreal, P.Q., 
Canada 
Stevens, Anne 

250 West 24th St., Apt. 5-E, New York 1, N. Y. 
Wadleigh, Anne J. 

Mrs. Stephen Gibert 

509 Knollwood Drive, Falls Church, Va. 

1950 
Atwood, Cynthia AfF. 

1371 Main St., Watertown, Conn. 
Bald-win, Barbara B. 

Mrs. Mark W. Potter 

37 Elizabeth St., Ossining, N. Y. 
Barry, Patricia J. 

Mrs. Harold G. Burbank, Jr. 

% PFC H. G. Burbank, Jr. U. S. 51182604, 4th 

Div. Band A.PO 39, % P.M. New York, N. Y. 
Burke, Patricia A. 

Mrs. John M. Wright 

601 Broad St., Ozark, Ala. 
Flather, Beverley F. 

Mrs. Charles G. Edwards 

157 Bowen St., Providence, R. I. 
Greenwald, Mary Jane 

19 East 88th St., New York, N. Y. 
Griffin, Joyce 

Mrs. Richard B. Kurz 

613 Gainsborough Rd., Apt. 3, Dayton 9, Ohio 
Lindamood, Ann 

Mrs. Robert H. Twyford 

2210 State St., Nashville, Tenn. 
Sinclaire, Helen Aff. 

Mrs. Harrv E. Blythe, III 

R. D. 3, Alliance, Ohio 



Stevens, Sarah M. 

Mrs. W. Duncan MacMillan, 2nd 

"Longridge", Rte. 5, Wayzata, Minn. 
Wright, Lucy Ann Aff. 

Mrs. Peter Case 

8282 U. S. Hwy. 54, El Paso, Tex. 
YoflFa, Gloria 

Mrs. Nelson Portnoy 

21 James St., New Bedford, Mass. 

1951 
Bissell, Anne 

The Barbizon Hotel, 140 East 63rd St., New 
York 21, N. Y. 
Chase, Clemency 

Chez Mme. Jeuffrain, 23 rue Francois Ier, Paris 8, 
France 
Dower, Sally 

186 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 
DeNoyelles, Ruth Ann Aff. 

Mrs. Robert E. Diefenbach 

RFD 2, Grifton, N. C. 
Gellatly, Elizabeth S. Aff. 

49 Brookside Ave., Apt. 3, Torrington, Conn. 
Hall, Constance 

Mrs. Benneville N. Strohecker 

201A Harvard Blvd., Lincoln Park, West Lawn, 
Pa. 
Morrison, Joan 

Nurses' Home, New England Baptist Hospital, 
Boston, Mass. 
Teasdale, Merilyn 

9 Sewall Ave., Brookline, Mass. 
White, Fay E. 

16 Anderson St., Boston, Mass. 

1952 
Allen, Nancy B. Aff. 

4973 Hillbrook Lane, N. W., Washington 16,D. C. 

1953 
Allen, Elizabeth Aff. 

4973 Hillbrook Lane, N.W., Washington 16, D. C. 
Gerald, Antonia H. 

The International School 

Route de Chene, Les Grands Boissieres, Geneva, 
Switzerland 

1955 
Ogden, Nancy N. Aff. 

309 South Commerce, Natchez, Miss. 

1956 
Albert, Leane Aff. 

450 Ocean Ave., Jersey City 5, N. J. 

Past Faculty 

Calhoun, Mrs. Alexander D. 

200 East 66th St., Apt. E-2001, New York 21, 
N. Y. 
Gay, Miss Mary 

118 South Cherry St., Winston-Salem, N. C. 
Grassi, Mrs. Robert (Edith Grassi) 

4125 East Roosevelt Blvd., Philadelphia, 24, Pa. 
Morris, Mrs. William C. (Dorothy Hopkins) 

19 High St., Camden, Me. 



Elizabeth Bradley '50 — Dean's List of Smith College 

Alice Emmert '51 — Representative to the Junior Class Council at Pembroke 

Sylvia Finger '51 — Dean's List of Smith College 

Nora Johnson '50 — Dean's List of Smith College 

Rosamond Reifsnyder '51 — Dean's List of Smith College 



20 



Jin m?moriam 



I 879 



Louisa Jeannette Smith died October 5, 
1953, in Andover, Mass. 

1881 

Fannie N. Sleeper (Mrs. Harry R. Seaverj 
died June 30, 1952, in Plaistow, N. H. 

1883 

Antoinette Louise Bancroft (Mrs. Wilson 
H. Pierce) died August 28, 1952. 

Sarah McClellan Holmes (Mrs. Harris E. 
Adriance) died May 30, 1953, in South Den- 
nis, Mass. 

1885 

Rosalind Pierce (Mrs. James O. Egerton) 
died July 2, 1953, in Providence, R. I. 

1888 

Mary C Bachelder (Mrs. Frederic R. 
Hastings) died recently in Bellflower, Calif. 

Mary Alice Schauffler (Mrs. Frederick C 
Piatt) died January 22, 1954, in New 
Haven, Conn., at the age of 85. She is sur- 
vived by a son and a daughter. Mrs. Piatt 
was a writer and former missionary. 

1889 

Mary Helen Covell died July 22, 1953, in 
South Glastonbury, Conn. 

Evalena French (Mrs. Charles W. Ander- 
son) died Jan. 15, 1954, in Derry, N. H. 



1890 



Lucinda Hall Bradford (Mrs. A. Huston 
Culbreth) died November 6, 1953. She was 
93 years old. 

1894 

Ida Ellen Cushing died November 30, 
1953, m Amesbury, Mass. 

1895 
Effie Backer (Mrs. George E. Briggsj 
died November 10, 1953, in Washington, 
D. C. She is survived by three daughters. 

1898 

Helen Eaton Richardson died November 
16, 1953, in Passaic, N. J., after a long illness. 

1911 

Maud Gutterson (Mrs. Thomas S. Green) 
died November 16, 1953, in Worcester, 
Mass. See class notes. 

1924 

Helen Hardenbergh (Mrs. John F. R. 
Seitz) died January 9, 1953. 

1931 

Clement Cruce died of cancer October 
31, 1953, in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. 
She had been ill for six weeks. Clement was 
active in the Junior League in Oklahoma 
City, and served as chairman of the com- 
munity workshop. Our sincere sympathy is 
extended to her parents. 



Class News 



1879 

Frances Adelaide Weeks wrote to us re- 
cently that she is now living in Arlington, Va. 
She is 96 years of age. 

1885 

Mary Jones Sauveur visited Abbot with 
her daughter last October. 

1886 

Mary Gorton Darling is planning to attend 
the 125th Birthday Celebration in May. 

1889 

Our sincere sympathy is extended to Annis 
Spencer Gilbert whose husband died October 
17, 1953, in Still River. He had been in ill 
health lor some time. Mr. Gilbert was one of 
the incorporators of the Packard Motor Car 



Co., and developed a basic formula for 
black dyes while associated with the Merri- 
mac Chemical Co. 

The class of 1889 has heard with great 
sorrow of the death of their classmate, Eva- 
lena French Anderson on January 15, 1954. 
Her home has been in Derry. N. H., for 
many years. 

1892 

Josephine Rounsevel Coffin's daughter, 
Miriam Richards, was married December 
29, 1953, to Walter E. Remmers. 

1894 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs. Sidney D. 
Furst (Aida Dunn), 47 W 7 est Water St., 
Lock Haven, Pa. 



21 



Charlotte Draper Brown is now living with 
her daughter in Mentor, Ohio. 

1896 

The class extends its sympathy to May 
Young Duffy whose husband died September 
16, 1953. 

1898 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs. John C. Angus 
(Annie Smart), 135 Main St., Andover, Mass. 

1904 

Reunion Chairman: Mary Byers Smith, 
89 Pinckney St., Boston, Mass. 

1906 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs. Reeve Chipman 
(Constance Parker), 74 Phillips St., Boston 
14, Mass. 

Married 

Evaline Korn to Harold Holmes Cookman, 
Oct. 14, 1953, in New York City. Mr. Cook- 
man is a graduate of Haverford College, Pa. 

1907 

Co-chairmen of reunion: Mrs. R. Warner 
Brush (Alice Webster), 1138 Adams St., 
Dorchester 24, Mass., and Mrs. Arthur R. 
Leeds (Clara J. Hukill), 2582 Derbyshire 
Rd., Cleveland, Ohio. 

1908 

Reunion Chairman: Dorothy Taylor, 118 
Elgin St., Newton Centre, Mass. 

Greetings to the class of 1908. Many of you 
will be helping Abbot celebrate her 125th 
birthday next May, the dates being the 
7th-gth, so let's have a get-together at that 
lime. It may be more convenient than the 
usual graduation date. Hope to see a goodly 
number of you then. Dorothy Taylor 

1909 

Co-chairmen of reunion: Mrs. Ray W. 
Tobey (Edith Gardner), The Choate School, 
Wallingford, Conn., and Mrs. Benjamin D. 
Miller (Gladys R. Perry), 32 Carver Rd., 
Wellesley Hills 83, Mass. 
Dear Class of 1909: 

How exciting it is to know that when we 
come together for our forty-fifth reunion we 
shall share Abbot's important birthday cele- 
bration. 

As one who keeps quite closely in touch 
with the school, I must emphasize the joys 
and satisfactions in store for you. 

From the West Coast, the East Coast, the 
Mid-West, the North and South, will come 
Abbot's loyal daughters — so 1909, come 
with gaiety to enjoy and enliven one another, 



and with reverence to receive Madame Ab- 
bot's blessing as she smiles from the chapel 
wall. Do come. Sally T. Knox 

Dear Classmates of 1909: 

With Sally's inspiring message to call us 
together, we're sure we'll all feel like starting 
our plans for reunion right away. We will 
eagerly look forward to your replies to the 
customary notices we hope to send out this 
month. If it is not possible for you to join us, 
may we have you come by letter? 

While we have kept Abbot traditions in 
our hearts, Abbot has also kept them, and in 
a wonderful way added to them. Come and 
see and enjoy our Abbot of 1954. 

We'll keep you posted, but save the day 

now. Edith Gardner Tobey 

Gladys Perry Miller 

Louise Norpell Meek's son, James, received 
his commission as a second lieutenant in the 
Regular Army from Virginia Military Insti- 
tute. 

Frances Wright Kimball writes, "It was a 
great pleasure to revisit Abbot this fall, and 
revive old memories. Was I ever as young as 
present-day students? It is basically the same 
— alterations and additions meeting modern 
demands. New England in autumn is out- 
standingly beautiful, California has nothing 
comparable." 

1910 

Laura Jackson Austin writes, "I expect to 
sail Feb. 6 for a cruise to the Orient, and a 
visit to my youngest son, Lt. Charles B. 
Austin, USN, and his family in Japan. 

Last summer I took a trip to Alaska. I am 
very busy with Red Cross work when I am at 
home. 

I recently had a visit with Betty Ordway. 
I hadn't seen her since Abbot days — more 
than forty years ago." 

Ethel Reigeluth Darby's husband has re- 
tired from business, and they spent last year 
in Naples. They expect to spend the next two 
years touring the world. 

1911 

Co-chairmen of reunion: Mrs. Douglas 
Donald (Edith Johnson), 8 Carisbrooke St., 
Andover, Mass., and Mrs. Louie S. Jones 
(Jessie Wightman), 128 High Rd., Kensing- 
ton, Conn. 

Start making plans now for May 7-9. Let's 
celebrate Abbot's 1 25th Birthday together. 

Edith Johnson Donald 



22 



The class notes were contributed by Edith 
Johnson Donald, the enthusiastic class fund 
secretary of 191 1. 

Maud Gutterson Green died in Worcester, 
Mass., Nov. 16, 1953. She had a serious oper- 
ation last spring, and seemingly recovered. 
Rhoda Green was with her during her last 
illness. She was president of our class, and 
one of the outstanding girls of 191 1. We shall 
miss her greatly. We extend sympathy to all 
her family and sisters. 

Dorothy Bigelow Arms escaped the tornado 
in Worcester last June. 

Congratulations to Mary Hall Lewis whose 
first grandson has arrived. Her husband has 
resigned his position with the Washington 
Community Chest. 

The class extends its sympathy to Dora 
Heys Pym whose mother died recently. 

Our sympathy is also extended to Jessie 
Wightman Jones whose father died July 10, 
1953, and whose son, Louie, died August 10, 
1953. Louie died from infantile paralysis 
lour days after he was stricken. 

1912 

The class extends its sympathy to Cathe- 
rine Vail Atwater whose husband died last 
October. 

1913 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs. Paul R. Tucker 
(Olga Erickson), 319 Tappan St., Brookline, 
Mass. 

Buy a piggy bank, save your pennies, and 
come to Andover the week end of May 7-9. 
Plan on a Reunion luncheon Saturday, May 
8. A reunion with the class and "gals" af- 
filiated with '13 should be fun. Don't miss it! 

I'll send along complete plans later. 

Olga Erickson Tucker 

Olga writes that her son, Carl, is now a 
major in the U.S.A.F., and is stationed at 
Scott Field, 111. A granddaughter, Amy 
Redington, was born Sept. 5, 1953. 

1914 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs. Lowell Sloan 
(Elsie Gleason), 67 Mount Vernon St., Bos- 
ton, Mass. 

Plans are now under way for our 40th 
Reunion in May of this year. Don't overlook 
the notice you receive. Read it, write at least 
to your Class Agent, and sign up for a reser- 
vation without delay. Any suggestion you 
may have will be greatly appreciated. 

Elsie Gleason Sloan 

Elsie contributed the following class notes. 



Louise Albrecht Kenny has two grand- 
children who are the children of her daugh- 
ter, Susan Louise. It was so good to hear 
from Louise! 

Harriet Bowman Meeker has recently re- 
turned from a European trip with her hus- 
band. She reports the birth of two new 
granddaughters and one new grandson, and 
now has five grandchildren. On a trip to 
California in 1951 Harriet saw Hildegarde 
Gutterson Smith, and also had a visit with 
Miss Howey. 

Marion Clarke Myerscough is still living in 
Texas, and your class agent still awaits a 
promised letter which never seems to get 
written. 

Rosamond Gens Lehnert spent last summer 
in New England visiting old friends and 
relatives around Boston. Since her husband's 
retirement three years ago, they spend their 
winters in St. Petersburg. 

The class extends its sympathy to Helen 
Gilbert Rich whose father died in October. 

Emma Holt Garside is looking forward to 
being at our reunion in May. Her 88-year- 
old father, whom many of us remember, 
visited Emma last spring at her home in 
Saco, Me. 

Margaret Wylie Ware left California last 
year to stay with her aunt in Ohio. Peg's son, 
M-Sgt. John Emerson Ware, a regular, has 
returned from Japan, and we have a charm- 
ing snapshot of them together for our collec- 
tion in May! Jack logged over 1,000 combat 
hours in Korea, being a flying engineer. As 
Peg says, "those three years took something 
out of me," but even so, she hopes to return 
to Abbot this year. Knowing her, we think 
she'll make it, and we certainly hope so! 

1915 

Reunion Chairman: Marion M. Brooks, 
134 Charles St., Boston, Mass. 

We will hold our 40th a year in advance, 
so we can help Abbot celebrate its 125th 
Birthday. You will hear from me soon, but 
save the week end of May 7-9. 

Marion Brooks 

The class extends its sympathy to Dorothy 
Gilbert Beilows whose father died in October. 

1916 

Reunion Chairman: Esther Kilton, 46 
Chestnut St., Boston 8, Mass. 

Katharine Odell Randall writes that, since 
her husband's death last year, she has been 



23 



running her home as a Guest House both for 
summer visitors and winter skiers. Katharine 
is secretary of the North Conway Chamber 
of Commerce, and is the attendant at the 
Information Booth in the summer. She hopes 
Abbot girls will stop by. 

1917 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs. Myron S. Chel- 
lis (Miriam Bacon), 15 Raymond Ave., 
Beverly, Mass. 

Abbot's 125th Birthday is to be cele- 
brated May 7-9. Let's join the other Abbot 
girls and have a real reunion. Hope to see 
you all at that time. Miriam Bacon Chellis 

Cornelia Newcomb Lattin visited her 
daughter, Harriet, at Seeley Lake, Montana, 
last summer after a trip through the Rockies 
and Canada. Cornelia now has a grandson 
and a granddaughter. 

1918 

Co-chairman of reunion: Irene Atwood, 
180 Commonwealth Ave., Boston 16, Mass. 
and Mrs. Francis S. Fuller (Louise Bacon), 
Topsfield Rd., Ipswich, Mass. 

To the Class of 1 9 1 8 : 

You can have fun 

At one hundred and one 

But it seems to me 

I'd rather be 

The age of we 

Seriously — We can have fun when we cele- 
brate Abbot's 125th birthday and our post- 
poned 35th reunion in May. We can have 
fun reminiscing, but more than that we'll 
find the comparisons of living, the exchange 
of ideas, thoughts and plans for the future 
will be stimulating, because there are some 
pretty interesting women in Abbot's Class 
of 1 91 8, and your chairmen hope you will 
find this out for yourselves, as well as see the 
development and changes at the school. 

You will find all the necessary informa- 
tion in your Bulletin so read it carefully. 
Last year your chairmen really struggled to 
get the information on a two-penny card. 
This year we're using Bulletin space, but 
you will hear from us later. 

There is no money in the treasury, but our 
expenses are low. 

Your reservation for the Class Reunion 
luncheon on Saturday must be made 
through your chairmen by April 26, — 
S2.50 plus tax and tip at Levaggi's, wonder- 
ful food, too! 



We're counting on each one of you to be 
back at Abbot May 7-9. 

Louise Bacon Fuller 
Irene Atwood 

Co-chairmen 

Lucy Lane Church writes that her son, 
Oliver, is practicing medicine in Rochester, 
N. Y., and is the father of two daughters. 

Martha G. Miller Reese's husband has 
been elected president of the American Bank- 
ers Association. Her daughter, Thekla, is 
secretary of the college governing body at 
Wheelock College in Boston. Martha and her 
husband have just returned from a plane 
trip to Europe where Mr. Reese addressed 
the International Chamber of Commerce. 

1919 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs. Warren O. 
Taylor (Katharine Coe), 25 Juniper Rd., 
Belmont 78, Mass. 

Plan now to attend our thirty-fifth re- 
union. You will hear from me soon. 

Katharine Coe Taylor 

Elizabeth Armstrong presented the school 
with Berenson's Italian Paintings in memory 
of Martha Melissa Howey, Abbot faculty, 
1 904- 1 925. 

1920 

Co-chairmen of reunion: Mrs. Warren 
Mansur (Edna Dixon), 61 Clark Rd., Low- 
ell, Mass., and Katherine Hamblet, 506 
Lowell St., Lawrence, Mass. 

Betty Babb Foxwell's younger son, Rich- 
ard, was married Dec. 31, to Joan Peterkin. 
Richard was graduated from Yale last year, 
and is now attending Communications 
School at Scott Air Force Base. Betty's older 
son, Marshall, and his family returned re- 
cently from two years in Europe. Betty is 
still the secretary of the Camden-Rockport 
Chamber of Commerce. 

1921 

Marion Cleveland Botsford reports the 
birth of a grandson, William B. Rydell, III. 
He is the son of Marion's daughter, Barbara. 
Marion's son, William, is now 16, and in 
Junior High School. We were sorry to learn 
that Marion's father died last May. 

1922 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs. William H. 
Vance (Olive Howard), Maple Dell Lane, 
Holliston, Mass. 

Our sincere sympathy is extended to 
Jane Baldwin whose sister died Dec. 23, 
1953, after three months in the hospital. 



24 



The class will be sorry to learn that 
Gwendolyn Bloomfield Tillson's father died 
last October and Marian Saunders Chees- 
borough's father died last summer. 

We have just, learned that Isabel Brown 
Lee is now Mrs. W. S. Crawford. 

Geneva Burr Sanders is writing society 
news for the Lynn, Mass. Daily Item. 

The class extends its sympathy to Kath- 
erine Damon Kletzien whose mother died 
Nov. 6, 1953. Katherine's daughter, Phyllis, 
a junior at Mt. Holyoke, is engaged to Ed- 
ward F. Campbell, Jr., Yale '53, now a 
student at McCormick Theological Semin- 
ary in Chicago. Edith, an older daughter, is 
in her fourth year of the nurse's training 
course at the University of Pennsylvania. 

1923 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs. Frank McArdle 
(Miriam Sweeney), 35 School St., Andover, 
Mass. 

We hope you can all attend the 125th 
Birthday celebration on May 7-9. With all 
the alumnae returning, it will be so festive 
to meet not only our own classmates, but 
friends from other classes as well. Do save 
the week end for a gala get-together! 

Miriam Sweeney McArdle 

Barbara Clay Crampton's daughter, Phebe, 
is engaged to Andrew Leighton of Cam- 
bridge, Mass. 

The class extends its sympathy to Edith 
Damon Bugbee whose mother died Nov. 6, 
1953. Mrs. Damon was visiting Edith at the 
time of her death. 

1924 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs. Sherman T. 
Baketel (Helen C. Epler), 17 Arthur Ave., 
Marblehead, Mass. 

Elizabeth Bragg Mcintosh writes that her 
son, Duncan, a senior at Amherst, plans to 
enter medical school next year. Her younger 
son, Alan, is a cadet at Admiral Farragut 
Academy. 

1925 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs. James A. 
O'Brien (Frances I. Howard), 5335 Holmes 
St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Because this is Abbot's 125th Birthday 
Party, our class is holding its thirtieth re- 
union a year early. You grandmothers, leave 
the spoiling of the grandchildren and fly, 
drive or run to Andover, May 7-9, 1954. 

If reservations are made early we may all 
be able to stay in the same place, which will 



make it much more like the "good old days." 
Let's hear of your plans and see you in 

Andover May 7. Fritz Howard O'Brien 

Dorothy Beeley Marsh and her string 

quartet played at the Boston Abbot Club 

meeting. Dorothy writes that she is teaching 

her 9-year-old daughter to play the violin. 
The class extends its sympathy to Alice 

Miller Spalding whose husband died last 

summer. 

1926 

Our sympathy is extended to Ruth Katz- 
mann Pope and Elsa Katzmann Abbot '27 
whose father died Oct. 15, 1953. 

Suzanne Loizeaux has been appointed 
secretary to Sen. Robert Upton of New 
Hampshire. Sue has been in Washington 
since the opening of Congress. 

1927 

Dorothy Spear Roberts writes, "My hus- 
band and I were transferred to Portland to 
open a branch office for Spear & Roberts. We 
moved here the first of July, and are greatly 
enjoying our new enterprise, and our new 
home which overlooks the ocean. I think we 
are going to be farmers without intention, as 
our home is surrounded by lovely fruit trees. 
It seems to keep the proverbial working girl 
quite busy during her time off from the 
office." 

1928 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs. Theodore E. 
Ward (Susan Ripley), 7 Abbot St., Andover, 
Mass. 

1929 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs. Russell T. 
Loesch (Polly Francis), 3 Sears Ave., Mel- 
rose, 76, Mass. 

1930 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs. Robert U. 
Ingraham (Kathie Fellows), 31 Center St., 
Danvers, Mass. 

All you 3oites please make a big effort to 
come to the reunion luncheon on May 8 at 
Levaggi's, to help celebrate Abbot's 125th 
Birthday. I'll be sending you detailed in- 
formation soon, but put a ring around the 
right date now. See you there. 

Kathie Fellows Ingraham 

1931 

Reunion Chairman: Emily Bullock, West 
Knoll Road, Andover, Mass. 

Jane Sullivan and I hope to receive word 
that you are all coming back for Abbot's 
125th Birthday Celebration in May. If you 



25 



can't come in person, send along a picture 
with news of yourself. Emily Bullock 

1932 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs. John F. Giblin 
(Elizabeth Holihan), 126 East St., Methuen, 
Mass. 

Who can say "No" to a party 

Especially if it's big and gay? 

Who could not manage a sortie 

To a 125th birthday? 

'32ers all be with us 

On this gala holiday 

You'll be hearing from me pronto, 

So make your plans today. 

Betty Holihan Giblin 
Born 
To Cynthia James Tharaud, a third child 
and first son, Lucien R., Jr., Sept. 8, 1953. 

1933 

Barbara Worth Brown writes, "We wish to 
contest Peg Chase Johnson's claim of having 
the last baby for the class of 1933. We have 
a daughter, Deborah Robbins, born April 
12, 1953!" 




Gretchen and Peter Van Wart, children of 
Betty Weaver Van Wart '33 

1934 

Two articles appeared in the Boston 
Herald recently about the enterprises of 
Katharine Damon Reed and her husband in 
North Conway, N. H. They operate a ski 
shop and a hardware store. They have three 
children, Carol, 15, Damon, 13, and Ste- 
phanie, 1 1 . 

Ruth Stott Peters and her family have 
moved to Houston, Texas, where Mr. Peters 
is financial vice-president of the Continental 
Oil Co. Her daughter, Binky, is in the 7th 
grade, and her son, Cappy, is in the 5th grade. 



Dan, 3, and Sam, 1 1 months, don't go to 

school! 

Born 

To Mary Rockwell Stewart, a second child 

and first daughter, Amy Rockwell, Oct. 27, 

1953- 

1935 

Married 
Cathleen Burns to William B. Elmer of 
Boston, May 30, 1953. Cathleen is still work- 
ing as assistant editor of a medical publica- 
tion. Times away from home and office are 
spent in church activities and on their 70- 
acre farm in New Hampshire. Short-story 
writing is her avocation, and she recently 
had an article in Seventeen. 

1936 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs. John L. Si- 
monds (Mary Trafton), 6 Buckingham 
Place, Cambridge 38, Mass. 

Do you remember Abbot Birthday? 'Tis 
an important day for Abbot this year. Why 
not make it important for the class of '36? 
Plan to join us May 7-9. If you will send pho- 
tographs and news of family, homes, and jobs, 
it will really be a reunion. Mail them soon, 
please. Mary Trafton Simonds 

Grace .Nichols Knight's husband has been 
made president of Lawrence College in Wis- 
consin. He succeeds Dr. Pusey who came to 
Harvard. 

Carol Rockwell Stevens is keeping up her 
tennis. She won the Greater Lawrence 
women's single tennis championship last 
September. 

Born 

To Nancy Dodge Lambert, a third child 
and second son, Mark Frederick, Sept. 10, 

1953- 
To Anne Robins Frank, a son, John Abel, 

Nov. 30, 1953. Anne's husband is in the oil 

exploration business. 

To Anne Russell Loring, a third child and 

first son, Malcolm Stevens, April 30, 1953. 

His sisters are 8 and 10 years of age. 

1937 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs. Arthur W. 
Tucker (Martha Ransom), 25 Jefferson Rd., 
Chestnut Hill 67, Mass. 

1938 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs. Malcolm A. 
Letts (Phyllis England), Middlebury, Conn. 

The class extends its sympathy to Phyllis 
Saunders Simpson whose father died last 
summer. 



26 




Sarah Sutor Parsons '38, her husband, and 
sons 

Born 

To Constance Abbott Schwab, a third 
child and first daughter, Marjorie, Nov. 15, 
1953. Connie writes that her husband, Dr. 
William Schwab, has been recalled to active 
duty with the Navy, and is stationed at the 
Naval Hospital in Portsmouth, Va. 

1939 

Reunion Chairman: Olive Butler, 72 
Poor St., Andover, Mass. 

Frances Cross Jones writes, "We have 
moved to the extreme southwest corner of 
Virginia. Any adventurous souls who come 
this way are cordially invited to call. Fran 
is practicing Pathology in a new laboratory 
in Norton. We live over the hill in Big Stone 
Gap. It's new country to us, and very ex- 
citing." 

1940 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs. Franklin R. 
Hoar (Doris Sawyer), 110 Sudbury Rd., 
Concord, Mass. 





Tink Downey Boutin writes that she and her 
family are settled in Woodland, Calif. Her 
husband is orthopedic surgeon for the Clinic. 

Margery Wick is teaching kindergarten 
in Cliffside, N. J. 

Born 

To Joan Carlson Hutchison, a second 
child and first son, Lewis Robert, III, Octo- 
ber 6, 1953. 

To Rachel Whitney Davis, a second son, 
Douglas Whitney, Nov. 27, 1953. 

1941 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs. Roberts G. 
Hannegan, Jr. (Doris Jones), 102 Cedar 
Rd., Hellertown, Pa. 

Sue Long Wagner is traveling in the 
United States. In Washington she saw Jane 
Towne Johnston, whose husband is with the 
Atomic Energy Commission. Sue says Jane 
is "as full of fun as ever." 




Judy and Nancy Ekberg, daughters of 
Marietta Meyer Ekberg '40 



John and Tini Boddington, sons of Josephine 
Hartwell Boddington '41 with Barbara Dunn, 
daughter of Miriam Calder Dunn '41 

Engaged 
Beverly Brooks to Carl Frederick Floe of 
Chehalis, Wash. Mr. Floe, an alumnus of 
Washington State College and M.I.T., is a 
Professor of Metallurgy and dean of the 
School of Industrial Management at M.I.T. 

Born 

To Dorothy Dean Johnson, a third child 
and first daughter, Cynthia, Dec. 9, 1953. 

To Frances Troub Roberts, a daughter, 
Margaret Hope, Dec. 20, 1953. 

1942 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs. James J. O. 
Stone (Rose Wind), 267 Ash St., Brockton 
31, Mass. 

Irene Abbott MacPherson writes that since 
she has moved to Quincy, Mass., she sees 



27 




Connie and April Ann Hopkins, daughters of 
Edith Ninomiya Hopkins '42 

Mary Peg Boynton MacPherson and her 
family quite frequently. 

Married 

Annette Louise Curran to Arthur Joseph 
Conlon, Jr. of Belmont, Mass., November 
26, 1953. Joyce Curran Nunez '41 was 
matron of honor. Mr. Conlon prepared at 
Phillips Exeter Academy, and was gradu- 
ated from Harvard College and Harvard 
Schooi of Business Administration. 
Born 

To Gloria Caldarone Hegarty, a second 
child and first daughter, Dec. 18, 1953. 

To Rose Wind Stone, a third child and 
first son, William Wind, Dec. 20, 1953. 

1943 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs. David W. 
Ewing (Elizabeth Bennett), 96 Foster St., 
Cambridge, Mass. 

Margaret Howard Long is now living on 
an eleven-acre farm near Annapolis, Md., 
and is enjoying country life very much. 

Betty-Lou Monett Hess is living near Chi- 
cago where her husband is manager of 
Clasa-Mohme Inc., distributors of Spanish 
language films. She writes that they are 
learning to play the Hammond organ which 
they acquired a year ago. 
Born 

To Barbara Lindsay Boynton, a fourth 
son, Douglas Lindsay, Nov. 5, 1953. 

To Bettye Rutherford McCouch, a second 
daughter, Susan Rutherford, Sept. 18, 1953. 

1944 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs. Albert G. Tier- 
ney, Jr. (Elisabeth Colson). 80 Lexington 
Ave., Cambridge, Mass. 

We have just learned that Maria Frederica 
Lange is now Mrs. John P. Dempsey. 

The following appeared in a recent issue of 



Mademoiselle: "From her office in the Metro- 
politan Museum, Emily (McMurray) Mead 
tells members and prospective members 
about exhibits and special events through 
letters, leaflets and direct talk. Her qualifi- 
cations: a layman's appreciation of art and a 
strong background in public relations. From 
Barnard she went to work for the Republi- 
cans as a publicity clerk. Then came public 
relations and fund raising." Emily's picture 
accompanied the article. 

Married 

Anne C. Corkran to Clairborne R. Mc- 
Gee, Jr., of Bernice, La., May 30, 1953. Mr. 
McGee was graduated from Louisiana In- 
stitute of Technology, and served in the 
Armed Forces in World War II. 

Cynthia J. Holmes to Gregory Waterman 
Spurr, Jr., of Sparkhill, N. Y. Dec. 12, 1953. 
Mr. Spurr was graduated from the Taft 
School, Yale College and the Amos Tuck 
School of Business Administration of Dart- 
mouth College. He served in the Army in 
World War II, and is now with the Bank of 
New York. 

Born 

To Betty Colson Tierney, a son, Albert 
Gerard, III, Dec. 24, 1953. 

To Nancy Emerson Viele, a second daugh- 
ter, Lucy Lyman, November 19, 1953. 

To Martha Watkins Curry, a second 
daughter, Melissa, May 6, 1953. 

1945 

Pam Clark Coyne is living in New Canaan 
while her husband is in Japan. 




Lindsay and Todd Bacon, children of 
Barbara Ball Bacon '45 



28 



_____ _- — __ — . — ___ _ 

, : 1 


___L J 


1 


<j 


Hfe 


i 


_. 7 


■^V V ■ 


_. 


_PTr 


i 





Karen and Kim Kolflat, children of Luetta 
Robertson Kolflat '46 

We have just learned that Lois Doyle was 
married to Reuben Miller, Sept. 14, 1952. 

Our sympathy is extended to Julia Gage 
Moses whose 13-month-old son died Dec. 19, 
1953, of spinal meningitis. 
Born 

To Josephine Bernardin deVries, a daugh- 
ter, October 6, 1953. 

To Esther Bufferd Watstein, a daughter, 
Sarah Barbara, Sept. 24, 1953. 

1946 

Muriel Greene Balmer writes, "Very few 
activities to report from this tour in Nigeria. 
We are again in "Bush," 60 miles from any 
white people. No water, no electricity, but 
we do have a battery-type telephone! In- 
stead of teaching or supervising dispensaries 
or prisons, my duties last tour, I have just 
over 600 Girl Guides (Scouts) to look after 
in an area of 150 miles. It is very interesting 
as the girls have Guiding as their only form 
of amusement. The political situation in 
Nigeria has deteriorated considerably in the 
past year. Although there is little personal 
danger, my husband is faced with more than 
an occasional riot to quiet. All this ends for 
a while on February 1 7, when we return to 
the States for a much needed leave. 

"I was thrilled to see that Abbot's 125th 
Birthday will coincide with our stay at 
home. I will be there and hope so much 
that as many of the class of 1 946 as can, will 
turn up. I don't know when we'll be home 
again, and keeping track of old friends makes 
all the difference in this peculiarly isolated 
Colonial Service life." 

Engaged 

Jane Weldon to John J. Boland of Brad- 
ford, Mass. Mr. Boland is a graduate of 



Merrimack College, and is now an ensign in 
the U. S. Naval Reserve. 
Born 

To Louise Doyle Collins, a third child and 
second daughter, Gail Justine, Dec. 18, 1953. 

To Phyllis Rairdon Wilce, a second child 
and first son, James, Oct. 7, 1953. Phyllis is 
now living in St. Louis where her husband 
is branch manager for Libbey Glass Co. 

To Mary Thomas Peck, a son, Douglas 
Thomas, June 26, 1953. 

To Marian Troub Friedman, a second 
child and first daughter, Elizabeth Ann, 
July 21, 1953. 

To Deborah Wiggin Cameron, a son, 
Braley Abbot, Jr., Nov. 24, 1953. 

1947 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs. Wallace L. 
Bolton (Barbara Dean), 115 Abbot St., 
Andover, Mass. 

Joanna Campbell Crocker writes that her 
husband has joined the General Electric Co. 
as an advanced-development engineer. 

Carol McLean, who has free-lanced for 
True Confessions magazine, is assistant editor 
of a civil engineering publication. 

Margot Meyer is working as physical 
therapist at Mary Fletcher Hospital in Bur- 
lington, Vt., and is also making house calls 
on arthritic patients. 

Betty Ann Mitchell is a secretary and edi- 
torial assistant for the Inter-University Case 
Program which publishes case studies in 
public administration. 

Engaged 

Christine von Goeben to John R. Curtis, 
Jr., of Dallas, Texas. Chris met Mr. Curtis 
in Vienna, Austria, where she was working 
with the government and he was studying on 




4**^ 



Sue Dampier, daughter of Geraldine 
Treadway Dampier '47 



29 



a Fulbright Scholarship. "A city where the 
East and West come together!" 
Married 

Emily Gierasch to 2nd Lieut. John May- 
nard Savage, USMC, of Norwell, Mass., 
Oct. 24, 1953, in Quantico, Va. 
Born 

To Patricia Carroll Dunsmore, a second 
child and first daughter, Mary Patricia, 
Nov. 26, 1953. 

To Ann Flowers Howlett, a second daugh- 
ter, Hilary, March 5, 1953. Her husband is 
advertising and public relations director for 
Wilson Sporting Goods Company. 

To Diane Gould Berkeley a second daugh- 
ter, Anne Randolph, Aug. 20, 1953. 

To Mary Lou Miller Hart, a daughter, 
Nancy Reed, June 24, 1953. 

1948 

Co. chairmen of reunion: Mrs. Samuel C. 
Stowell (Mary Katharine Lackey), 113 In- 
dependence Dr., Hancock Village, Chestnut 
Hill, Mass., and Mrs. Charles H. Wansker 
(Carolyn England), 26 Chauncy St., Apt. 4, 
Cambridge, Mass. 

Mary Farrar has left her work with E. P. 
Dutton Co., publishers, and is studying at 
George Washington University. She is 
majoring in History. 

Barbara Shulze, who is a graduate of the 
Simmons College School of Nursing, is now 
in residence at the Grace New Haven Com- 
munity Hospital. 

Engaged 

Laura Martha Barber to Preston Brooks 
Lowrance, Jr., of Chattanooga, Tenn. Dr. 
Lowrance is a graduate of Baylor School in 
Chattanooga, University of Virginia, and 
the Medical School of the University of 
Virginia. He is head of cardiac research and 
an assistant professor in the Department of 
Internal Medicine at the University of Vir- 
ginia. 

Helen Taylor to Frank Potter Dodd of 
Middletown, Conn. Mr. Dodd was gradu- 
ated from Wesleyan University. 
Married 

Katharine H. Bigelow to Thomas M. 
Fitzgerald, Jr., Jan. 9, 1954, in La Canada, 
Calif. Mr. Fitzgerald graduated from Brook- 
lyn Preparatory School, and Georgetown 
University. He served in the Army for three 
years. He is now with the First National 
Bank of Boston. 

Born 

To Martha Ball Geiken, a son, Brooks 



Ware, Dec. 18, 1953. Martha's husband is 
assistant manager of the Grand Rapids 
Furniture Co. 

To Patricia Barnard Lally, a son, Court 
Barnard, Jan. 6, 1954. 

To Jane Jackson Parks, a son, Benjamin 
Green, III, Sept. 1, 1953. 

1949 

Margaret Black Dintruff writes that her 
husband graduated from Emerson College 
last June, and is now working for the Taylor 
Instrument Co. in Rochester, N. Y. They 
have bought a new home in Rochester, and 
Micky would love to have any Abbot girls in 
the vicinity drop in for a visit. 

Ellie Bozyan is spending the winter in 
London, studying English Literature and 
German through University of London ex- 
tension courses, voice at the Guildhall 
School of Music, and organ with Lady Susi 
Jeans. 

Paula Flowers is teaching a second grade 
group in Glencoe, 111. She received her B.S. 
in Education from Northwestern last June. 

Anne Miskell is teaching a grade in the 
New Bedford, Mass. school system. 

Engaged 

Joan Webster to Pvt. Alexander Com- 
mins Post, USA, of Akron, Ohio. Pvt. Post, 
a graduate of Western Reserve Academy and 
Williams College, is now stationed at Fort 
Knox, Ky. 

Married 

Barbara Hamby to James P. McLane, 
Jan. 13, 1954. Mr. McLane is a graduate of 
Phillips Andover and Yale College. A former 
1500-meter Olympic swimming champion, 
he was also captain of the American Swim- 
ming Team in the 1952 Olympic Games. He 
is now serving in the Army at Fort Dix, N. J. 

Anne Myles Mansfield to William Denhart 
Borah, October 3, 1953, in Bronxville, N. Y. 
Mr. Borah was graduated from Harvard 
and served with the Navy in World War II. 

1950 

Beverley Flather Edwards writes that her 
husband graduated from Navy OCS in 
January. They will be in Washington for 
three weeks, and then go to Glenview, 111., 
for 5 months more schooling. 

The class extends its sympathy to Joyce. 
Griffin Kurz whose three-month-old son, 
Jeffrey, died Nov. 18, 1953, of intestinal 
pneumonia. Joyce's husband received his 
B.A. degree from Ohio Wesleyan last June. 
He was commissioned a 2nd Lieut, in the 



30 



Air Force at that time, and is now at Samp- 
son Air Force Base. 

Engaged 

Elizabeth Goodspeed to Francis Dale 
Fellner of Westport, Conn. Mr. Fellner is a 
graduate of Proctor Academy and the 
Merchant Marine Academy, King's Point, 
L. I. He is with Moore-McCormack Lines. 

Nancy L. Shulze to Elliott S. Lamb of 
Andover. Mr. Lamb is a graduate of the 
Peddie School, and is a senior at Yale. 
Married 

Patricia A. Burke to John M. Wright, 
June 27, 1953, in Keene, N. H. Mandy Bow- 
man and Joan Aldrich were bridesmaids. 
Mr. Wright graduated from Princeton in 
June, and also received his commission as a 
2nd Lieutenant in U.S.A.R. They have been 
at Camp Rucker, Ala., and are to be trans- 
ferred soon to Ft. Sill, Okla. 

Ann Lindamood to Robert Hull Twyford, 
Dec. 22, 1953, in Tiptonville, Tenn. 

Gloria Hope Yoffa to Dr. Nelson Portnoy 
of New Bedford, Mass., June 28, 1953. Joyce 
Toff a Rudolph was matron of honor. Dr. 
Portnoy graduated from Boston University 
and Northwestern Medical School. He is a 
specialist in urology in New Bedford, Mass. 

Born 

To Barbara Baldwin Potter, a son, Mark 
Winslow, Jr., Jan. 19, 1954. 

To Harriet Lattin Dunlap, a son, William 
James, July 5, 1953. His sister, Elizabeth, 
was 2 last October. 

1951 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs. Benneville N. 
Strohecker (Constance Hall), 201-A Har- 
vard Blvd., Lincoln Park, West Lawn, Pa. 

Anne Bissell is studying at the Katharine 
Gibbs School in New York. 

Clemency Chase is spending her Junior 
year in Paris. 

Dino Colburn is studying at the Yale 
School of Music. 

Alison Faulk is at the John Robert Powers 
School of Modeling. 

Sylvia Finger is spending her Junior year 
in Paris with the Smith group. 

Barbara Gibson and Shirley Young played 
in the orchestra for the Junior show at 
Wellesley. 

Minola Habsburg is in Europe for a year. 

Madeleine Kimberly has transferred to 
Pembroke. 

Sally Mason is studying in Paris this year. 

Polly Paradise participated in the Junior 



show given at Mount Holyoke as a member 
of the dance group which provided a back- 
ground lor the action. 

Fay White is the floor manager in the 
children's department at Filene's in Boston. 
Engaged 

Sally Ann Dower to Jack W. Saglio of 
Providence, R. I. Mr. Saglio was graduated 
from Tufts College, and is now attending 
Tufts Medical School. Sally graduated from 
Forsyth Dental Infirmary last June, and is 
now working in Boston. 

Edna Grieco to Thomas Jay Thomas of 
Melvin Village, N. H. Mr. Thomas was 
graduated from Brewster Academy and at- 
tended Piedmont College. He is now sta- 
tioned at Lackland Air Force Base, San 
Antonio, Texas. 

Merilyn Teasdale to Charles L. Abbott of 
Plymouth, Mass. Mr. Abbott is a junior at 
Boston University. Merilyn graduated from 
Forsyth Dental Infirmary last June, and is 
now working in Boston. 

Married 

Flor de Maria Palacios to Hero Duterloo, 
Dec. 21, 1953, in Curacao. 
Born 

To Barbara Wood Emmons, a second child 
and first son, Deighton Kimball, Sept. 10, 

1953- 

1952 

Constance Markert is taking a course in 
medical record administration at Colby 
Junior College. 

Ann McElroy is studying at Northwestern. 

Helen Neisser returned to Peru in Decem- 
ber. She plans to travel in South America 
during the winter, and return to North- 
western for the spring term. She is going to 
Europe with her parents for the summer. 
Helen is president of the French Club at 
Northwestern. 

Anne Spencer is attending the University 
of Tulsa at Tulsa, Oklahoma. 

1953 

Tony Gerald is studying at the Interna- 
tional School in Geneva. 

Present Faculty 

Miss Gertrude Tingley, teacher of Voice, 
attended the convention of the National As- 
sociation of Teachers of Singing which was 
held in St. Louis during the Christmas holi- 
days. She was one of a panel of four teachers 
from various parts of the United States at 
the Vocal Clinic. She was elected national 
registrar of the association. 



3 1 



Alumnae Trustee Ballot 

Mail this ballot before March 25, 1954, to Mrs. Ernest F. Tillson, 
26 Great Road, Bedford, Mass. 

VOTE FOR ONE 



PAULINE HUMESTON CARTER 



Mary Jane Owsley Warwick 



Cut along this line. 



Please send news items for class notes to the Alumnae Office, 
Abbot Academy, Andover, Mass., before April 25, 1954. 



Today's date 

Maiden Name Class 

Married Name 

Address 

Postal Zone 



Announcement! 

An anonymous gift of $50,000 in memory of the former 
President of our Board of Trustees, George E. Abbot. 



The donor has suggested that this gift be used toward 
a new gymnasium to be named for George E. Abbot. 

In accepting the gift with the warmest gratitude, the 
Trustees have voted to make the building of the gym- 
nasium an immediate objective. 

It was our expectation that there would be no special 
financial appeal in connection with the 125th Anniver- 
sary Celebration. This heartwarming unexpected gift, 
however, certainly challenges us, and plans will be 
announced soon for raising the necessary total. 



SUPPLEMENT TO 

ABBOT ACADEMY BULLETIN 

Series 21 FEBRUARY, 1954 Issue 2 



Candidates for Nomination for 
Alumnae Trustee 

The nominating committee of the Alumnae Association presents the 
following candidates for nomination to the Abbot Board of Trustees to serve 
from 1 954- 1 960. 

Nominating committee: Mrs. Ernest F. Tillson (Gwendolyn Bloomfield 
'22), chairman; Mrs. David L. Babson (Katherine Allen '31); Mrs. Harry L. 
Hansen (Carolyn Guptill '33). 

CANDIDATES 

Pauline Humeston (Mrs. Herbert P. Carter), Abbot 1927, 163 Glenwood 
Road, Englewood, N.J. 

Graduated from Wellesley 1931. 
Secretary for Harper & Brothers 1932-36. 
Married in 1936. Husband is a lawyer. Has a 
daughter, 15, a son, 13, and a son, 9. 
Active in Englewood Junior League 1941-48; 
past chairman of Home Service of Northern 
Valley Chapter of American Red Cross; active 
in Parent Teachers Association of Englewood 
School for Boys and Franklin School; trustee of 
Elizabeth Morrow School 1950-51; vice-chair- 
man of International Relations Department of 
Englewood Woman's Club 1952-53; teacher in 
Church School of First Presbyterian Church 

1 949-54- 

Member of New York Abbot Club. 

Mary Jane Owsley (Mrs. Jack R. Warwick), Abbot 1930, 26 Ledgewood 
Road, Bronxville, N. Y. 





Attended Smith College and University of 
Geneva. 

Merchandising, 1932- 1935. 

Married in 1935. Husband is an advertising 
executive. Has a daughter, 16, and a son, 14. 

Active in Junior League 1930- 1954. 

Has served as secretary, vice-president, and di- 
rector of New York Abbot Club. 



See ballot on opposite page. 



"^ssr- 






Tutah' 




! ! Montana" 



^ J n'v!K^£ — 

'0AH0l4V^ 

i 



f NORTH DAKol 



I 

i 

| south Dakota' 



wvomincTj 



EBRASKA 



"1 i 

/ COLORADO 1 j 



20 



•kans'as" 



/ w EVnS/c6 -r— 1 



,% Lp-* 



J 

i TEXAS 



k 




Sent by the School to All Abbot Girls 




1829 





1954 




Abbot Academy Bulletin 

May 1954 



ABBOT ACADEMY BULLETIN 



Series 21 



MAY, 



J954 



Issue 



Abbot Academy Alumnae Association 

Associate Member of the American Alumni Council 



President 
Miss Irene Atwood 
180 Commonwealth Ave. 
Boston 16, Mass. 

Vice-presidents 
Mrs. Edmund W. Nutting 
(Mary Howard) 
21 Wave Ave. 
Wakefield, Mass. 

Miss Dorothy Taylor 
118 Elgin Street 
Newton Centre 59, Mass. 

Mrs. A. Lawrence Van Wart 
(Betty Weaver) 
160 Melrose Place 
Ridgewood, N. J. 



OFFICERS— 1954-1956 

Clerk 
Mrs. Robert C. Holland 
(Barbara Healey) 
211 Chestnut Street 
Andover, Mass. 

Treasurer 

Mrs. Lawrence D. Bragg, Jr. 

(Mary Dooley) 
Alden Road 
Andover, Mass. 

General Secretary 
Miss C. Jane Sullivan 
97 Knox Street 
Lawrence, Mass. 



Alumnae Trustees 
1948-1954 
Miss Jane Baldwin 
140 East 28th Street 
New York, New York 

1951-1957 

Mrs. H. Guyford Stever 
(Louise Risley) 
36 Fairmont Street 
Belmont, Mass. 



ABBOT CLUB PRESIDENTS 



BOSTON 

Mrs. Robert H. Marsh 
(Dorothy Beeley) 
32 Williams Road 
Lexington 73, Mass. 

CHICAGO 

M ks. Floyd Shumway 

(Margaret Rabling) 

815 East Deerpath 

Lake Forest, Illinois 

CONNECTICUT 
Mrs. Donald Hoggson 
(Gertrude Drummond) 
R.F.D. 
Lakeville, Conn. 

DETROIT 

Mrs. Howard H. Fitzgerald 
(Jean Craig) 
19091 Bedford Road 
Birmingham, Michigan 



MAINE, EASTERN 

Mrs. Richard Roberts 
(Dorothy Spear) 
Payson Road 
Falmouth Foreside, Maine 

MAINE, WESTERN 

Mrs. Frank N. Wells 
(Louise Houghton) 
32 Ship Channel Road 
South Portland, Maine 



NEW YORK 

President 
Mrs. Lucien R. Tharaud 
(Cynthia James) 
17 East 96th Street 
New York 28, N. Y. 



OHIO, CENTRAL 
Mrs. John B. Gager 
(Thelma Mazey) 
228 N. Drexel Avenue 
Columbus 9, Ohio 

OHIO, CLEVELAND 

Mrs. Edward F. Little 
(Nancy Baylor) 
1407 Commonwealth Avenue 
Mayfield Heights 
Cleveland 24, Ohio 

OLD COLONY 

Mrs. Oscar M. Finger 
(Martha Wind) 
8 Belcher Avenue 
Brockton, Mass. 



THE EDITORIAL BOARD 

Jane B. Carpenter, 1892, honorary 
Constance Parker Chipman, 1906, honorary 
C.Jane Sullivan, 1931, Editor-in-Chief 
Irene Atwood, 191 8, ex officio 



Published four times yearly, October, February, May, and September, by Abbot Acad- 
emy, Andover, Massachusetts. 

Entered as second class matter December 12, 1933, at tne P ost office at Andover, Mass' 
achusetts, under the act of August 24, 191 2. 



Spring Calendar — 1954 



May 1 6 Two-piano concert by Miss Friskin and Mr. Coon 

May 22 College Entrance Board Examinations for Senior Mids. Student 
Recital 

May 23 Vespers — The Reverend Raymond Calkins, D.D., Pastor Emeri- 
tus First Church in Cambridge 

May 29 Field Day 

May 30 Vespers — The Reverend Sidney Lovett, D.D., Chaplain of Yale 
University 

May 3 1 -June 3 Final Examinations 

June 4 Student Government Chapel 



The One Hundred Twenty-fifth Commencement 

June 4 Rally Night, 8 p.m. 

June 5 Last Chapel, 9:30 a.m. 

Garden Party, 4:00-6:00 p.m. 
Draper Dramatics, 8 p.m. 

June 6 Baccalaureate, 10:45 a.m. Baccalaureate Sermon by The Rever- 
end Erdman Harris, Th.D., Headmaster Emeritus, Shady 
Side Academy 

Senior Supper 6:00 p.m. 

Commencement Concert, 7:30 p.m. 

June 7 Graduation Exercises, 10:00 a.m.. Commencement address by 
The Reverend Theodore Parker Ferris, D.D., Rector, Trinity 
Church, Boston 




CO 
< 
> 

H 

O 
P 

o 
E 

H 

GO 



o '.e 



-a 



O 
< 

s 

03 

-d 



- CO 






C 



•5 co 

SI 

"■ n ^ 
2 CO 



Cs 



o 
X 



CI 

03 

" (J 

o t> 

co o 

" J 

^ .*■» 

S s 



CO"-" 

bfi £ 

bc.a 

•- o3 



o 



5 d 









o m 
co a 
- 03 



I 



S'il 






O « 

H 

O 

PQ 
PQ 
< 






03 

PQ 



P. O 






£ 



CO" 

^PQ -2 A 



o3 

s~ 

tin 



1^ 

C X! 



O £ 



OS 

bO 






ft! 



5 8 



§§% 



<5 Oi 



C 

u 
t/J 

C 

PC 



BQ 



A Week End to Remember 

Polly Francis Loesch, 1929 

The one hundred and twenty-five years of inspiration and education at 
Abbot Academy were remembered by a week-end Birthday Party on May 
7, 8, and 9. After Mother Nature had spent almost a week scrubbing and 
washing all the trees along School Street and had starched all the lovely 
flowers, she wiped her hands and stepped back to admire the Abbot Circle 
as it was prepared for its 125th Birthday Party. It was a very special event. 
All the alumnae from far and near who could possibly return were back to 
celebrate — some were returning for the first time — others had been out 
5, 10, 25, and 50 years, and more. There were others who were not having a 
class get-together but came back to find friends and renew acquaintances. 
But like so many fussy housekeepers, Mother Nature wasn't quite satisfied 
with the fresh chartreuse tints of the birch leaves or the brilliant purple iris 
which edged the McKeen garden. She continued to wash and scrub with 
showers throughout the week end. In spite of the weather, the spirits and 
enthusiasm of the alumnae were not dampened. 

Those who returned for the Friday night dinner had an advantage over 
those who could only attend a portion of the week end. The five presidents of 
the student body (Student Government, Athletic Association, Christian 
Association, Senior Class, and Day Students) held up a verbal mirror of re- 
flections upon the progress and trends of their various activities. For the 
class of 1929 many of the fundamental changes were encouraging as the 
seeds of the merit system, the formation of the Gargoyle and Griffin teams 
had been planted twenty-five years ago. The more drastic changes of dress, 
social life, and discriminatory regulations brought smiles to the lips of those 
of the "flapper" era (from the point of view of style — the "flapper error!") 
and a twinkle to the eyes of those of the "high button boots" era. 

The meals served by the school culinary department were delicious and 
attractively served by the students. The generosity of the school in inviting 
the returning alumnae was greatly appreciated by all who were fortunate 
enough to be able to attend. The details of the behind-the-scenes prepara- 
tions of Jane Sullivan were evident in the smoothness of the programs. Al- 
though we missed the traditional presentations by the dramatic or music de- 
partments it was enjoyable to see another Art interpreted by the students — 
modern dance. For some it recalled memories of flowing draperies and flights 
across the Davis Hall floor — some pleasant, some embarrassing. But deeper 
reflection could not help but bring out the realization of the time and 
thought which had gone into the direction and performance of this blend of 
graceful motions in the energetic teen-ager. To the eye which had been 
saturated with television ballets and interpretative dancing the significance 
of this form of art may not have been as apparent at first. To the parent of 



the "awkward age" it was a revelation of the development of interpretative 
qualities and muscle coordination. 

After the recital there was some time for greetings with faculty, friends 
and classmates. Some had changed with the years. Many had improved with 
the addition of gray hair, the addition or loss of a few pounds or so, or the 
development of a matured personality. Underneath the gray locks, the 
changes in physical appearance, was still the heart of the Abbot Girl, waiting 
for that spark of recognition from a classmate, or that hearty handshake 
from the faculty who recognized each alumna as a person who had "arrived". 
There were a few dropped stitches here and there where classmates had 
thought — "No one will be interested in anything I could write or say! I 
won't be missed." But the answer is: there will always be someone who 
returns or writes who will be very disappointed not to hear from YOU — 
or YOU — or YOU. 

And so to bed for the first night ! The threads of conversation raveled off 
into sleep. Saturday morning meant breakfast at the school in the Tiffin ; 
Room. For those who have not been back recently, this is the old dining 
room which is used for a mid-morning refreshment period between classes. It 
is also used for the modern dance classes until a more suitable place is pro- 
vided in the proposed gymnasium. Others ate in the local coffee shops, 
visited the homes and shops of Abbot graduates or visited the Art Exhibit at 
the Alumnae headquarters. 

The Annual Meeting was moved to Davis Hall to accommodate the 
increase in alumnae participation. The business was dispatched efficiently 
and effectively by the president of the Alumnae Association, Miss Irene 
Atwood, 1 91 8. It included reports from the officers, classes, recognition of 
the reunion classes, Miss Jane Carpenter, Mrs. Constance Chipman, and Miss 
Annah J. Kimball, 1884, and old girls who had come from Pasadena, Calif- 
ornia, and as far away as Spain. Miss Hearsey presented the Senior Class 
which traditionally serenaded Miss Hearsey and the President of the Alum- 
nae Association and the 25- and 50-year classes. 

The meeting was concluded with gales of laughter as alumnae paraded in 
the fascinating creations of their periods. After a tour through the dining 
hall where the present student body witnessed the display of styles the 
models made a quick change into modern dress and joined their classmates 
at the Andover Inn (1894-1913) or Levaggi's (191 4- 1953). Here the hubbub 
of conversation filled the air; letters were passed around and photographs 
admired. The next event was the Bazaar which was held inside Davis Hall 
with booths dedicated to the reunion classes. It was a pensive group of '29ers 
as they contemplated the green and white booth — the white elephant 
table! The Scotch pipers, the auctioneer, the gardenias all continued the 
thread of tradition as history tells that a "bazaar was held" to raise money 
for the construction of the earliest building. 

Those who were able to remain for the climax of the week end, the 
Banquet, were impressed with the charm and wit of the toastmistress, Miss 
Margaret Van Voorhis, 191 8, as she wove together the introductions of the 



trustees and officers, and Frances Flagg Sanborn who read the treasurer's in- 
spiring report in the absence of her father. Miss Marguerite Hcarsey re- 
freshed our memories with a warm and entertaining history of the progress of 
the school's construction and growth to the stakes for the new gymnasium 
near the Infirmary. As always, the words of Miss Hearsey reflected her great 
ability and understanding as the heart and soul of an exceptionally fine 
faculty and staff. Her cordiality and friendliness to all returning alumnae 
symbolize how much she does to develop the inspirational spirit which pre- 
vails in the school. 

The banquet speaker, Miss Margaret Clapp, President of Wellesley 
College and Trustee of Abbot Academy, challenged the alumnae, trustees, 
and officers with the increasing needs of education in the world today and 
the responsibilities of mature women to that need. There is opportunity 
ahead. 

As the evening drew to a close it was with a sense of regret that there had 
not been more time to see and talk with more friends. Those who had at- 
tended the entire week end had had more occasions for leisurely visits. But 
parents had to return to their home and family responsibilities. There were 
many who remained another night and breakfast to attend the Chapel 
service and hear Raymond Calkins, D.D., give a most inspiring message. 

With the echoes of Happy Birthday ringing in the air and the promise 
of the much needed gymnasium to house the increasing athletic activities 
and release Davis Hall for dramatic and music rehearsals and perform- 
ances the Abbot Circle stopped spinning — and returned to preparations 
for examinations and graduation. 



Anniversary Banquet 

Mr. Flagg's Tribute 

(Delivered at Banquet by Frances Flagg Sanborn, 1926) 

It is with deep regret that I cannot meet and discuss Abbot problems 
in person with you tonight. But it's not to be. So may I share a few of my re- 
flections through this written text. 

Tonight the Abbot family of 1954 pays tribute to the high purposes of 
those leaders who in 1829 believed in the establishment of this school. You 
have heard those ideals set before you from the rostrum of Abbot Hall many 
times. Dedication to them has been maintained and nurtured through the 
years by devoted women and men. Our school is now ending a cycle of a 
century and a quarter of long and honorable life. Over this period thousands 
have passed through her portals into the more active pursuits of life — a 
subtle and potent power for good when such numbers pass into the world of 

5 



service. During periods of economic dislocation, wars, depressions, trial and , 
error in the interpretation of what is worthwhile in life, Abbot has been 
steady in her belief that her constitution defined well the great end and aim in 
living as written in the year 1829. It is the same base upon which the Abbot 
of 1954 rests its life and future. A host of great and wise mothers, noble 
teachers, social and spiritual leaders and exemplars lived their teen-age years 
at Abbot and ennoble her roster of alumnae. Children and grandchildren 
have followed Abbot's leadership. Why? Can it be other than an indefinable 
influence that has flowered in character training as to what makes women 
happy and serviceable to society? Great preachers have been the guests of 
Abbot girls. Observers in social and spiritual fields, in travel, in living values 
have graced her platforms. She has kept the faith. 

The Centennial Fund pledged to support effective teaching was dedi- 
cated 25 years ago by an organized group of alumnae. They raised these 
moneys over a ten-year period under the leadership of Alice Twitchell of 
Portland, Maine — Class of 1886. Thus did they emphasize that Abbot's 
foundations should be made sound and strong. 

The McKeen Building was built in 1903 by gifts from alumnae under 
the leadership of Mary Merriam of Newton, Massachusetts, Class of 1870. 

The gifts of loyal Abbot friends and alumnae have been constant over 
the years, and aside from buildings, her invested assets are now earning 
moneys that are helping to keep her charges well in the middle field of tui- 
tion expenses for independent schools. The fact that Abbot's registration is 
at maximum each year, tells its own story as to reasons ! 

Abbot has been the beneficiary of much sacrificial giving to reinforce 
her work as a helpful member of society. Her new heroic effort to round out 
a Department of Physical Education has been started. Effort and purpose 
availeth much and in due time we hope all of you will share with us the joy 
in realizing it as another unit in a symmetrically developed school plant. 

I have spent over one third of Abbot's 125 years of life as its Treasurer. 
And I am ever mindful that end results are not for this generation only. And 
greatest of all, I pay tribute to the life blood that makes any school great and 
strong — its teachers and its leadership. Through the years the colleges 
have recognized and paid tribute to the quality of her teaching. It so stands 
today ! 

In this delightful association tonight all here gathered — be they guest, 
alumna, faculty or trustee — are co-workers and co-sharers. Accordingly 
may I vision for our school: First: A continuing reputation as a field for the 
best in teaching and character building. Second: Possession of a growing re- 
tirement Fund. Third: An enlarged endowment for scholarships. Fourth: 
Lowest tuition charge consistent with superior service. And Fifth: Acquisi- 
tion as soon as possible of funds to complete our new physical education 
unit. What a goal to attain! Ever mindful again that end results are not 
necessarily for this generation only, let quality always be regarded at Abbot 
as the best defense for her life as an independent school in its mission to 
serve ! 



Address 

Marguerite Hearsey 

I am delighted that such a large number of you are here, — that you 
wanted to come, and were able to get here for this significant milestone in 
Abbot's history. I am sure that many old girls are with us in spirit tonight 
and would gladly have come if Praetoria, Bangkok, or Curacao were not so 
many miles away — or final exams so near — and that many others from 
all 47 states would have been here, if, aside from distances and dollars, 
children, grandchildren, or a husband's plans, had not made the trip im- 
possible. That nearly 300 of you have mastered these obstacles (to one 
whose college motto was "Where singleness is bliss 'tis folly to be wives" I 
may be excused for making the slip of putting a husband in the category of 
obstacles!) that nearly 300 of you are here, is indeed a tribute to your 
school. It indicates strong ties, affection for classmates, and the validity of 
the memories of those days when your "hearts were young and gay." For if 
they were not always so — if there were moments of despair in the face of the 
binomial theorem, or the conjugation of the verb acquerir, or the signifi- 
cance of the Congress of Vienna — or that moment when in the Principal's 
office you were made miserably aware of the unsocial act of indiscretion you 
had committed — happily those memories are not painful now. Perhaps 
you recall rather a moment of illumination in a Chemistry class, or that 
time when you caught the beauty of a poem till then meaningless to you; or 
that hockey game when you made the deciding winning goal — or the time 
when, contrary to all deserts, some teacher or principal was far more human 
than you had expected; or that quiet word of commendation on some diffi- 
cult job well done. And I assure you that your teachers and principals recall 
most vividly the pleasant things about you ! 

As I have read from time to time the history of Abbot, and as I have 
thought of it especially in connection with this 125th anniversary, I am im- 
pressed over and over again with the long line of distinguished people whose 
lives have been built into this school and are far more truly its foundations 
and its timbers than any material stones or mortar. 

Phillips Brooks, who was a warm friend of the school, remarked that 
"A great school is a great personality; only it has the privilege of growing 
mature without growing old." This is true, I believe. A great school has a 
personality, an individuality, and yet it is a composite personality, made up 
of the great individuals who have put their minds and their hearts into it 
with devotion and disinterestedness. 

Even partially to list the names of those who come to the minds of the 
various generations represented here, with gratitude and pleasure, would 
take far too long. There are a few here who remember Miss Philena McKeen, 
Fraulein Schiefferdecker, Miss Merrill, and know what distinguished people 
they were, what they owe to them. There are many who recall with affection 



and gratitude Martha Howey, Rebekah Chickering, Bertha Morgan Gray, 
Walter Howe, Bertha Grimes, Miss Kelsey, Miss Mason, and of more recent 
years Ruth Baker, Helen Robinson, Hope Baynes, Mary Gay, Mary Car- 
penter Dake, Kate Friskin, and Alice Sweeney. I am sure I have omitted 
many names that various ones of you would include. But what can I say 
more? For time would fail me to tell of all the others. Certainly tonight we 
are compassed about with a great cloud of witnesses. 

I find in the record of the magnificent breakfast that was given Miss 
McKeen in 1892 on her retirement, that among the toasts proposed by Pro- 
fessor Churchill was one to the faculty. He said that Miss McKeen strongly 
resembled Napoleon in two respects — in her deep sense of the vital im- 
portance of surrounding herself with good field marshals and in her sagacity 
in choosing them. Miss Merrill responded to the toast and among other 
things said: 

"If a composite photograph were made of the faculty, I am almost sure 
that the face of Miss McKeen would assert itself through the others. The 
impress of her life is stamped upon us all. We all recognize her guiding hand 
and she, judicious, practical, recognizes the individuality of her teachers 
and wisely gives them free scope in their several departments. In so far as my 
experience goes, I should say the teachers have been strongly individual; 
have a mind of their own. How many girls would unite with me in saying 
that the character of the life of some teacher friend has been one of the 
strongest influences in their lives. Our aim is right and true. We wish to in- j 
struct and inform the mind and quicken the whole being of those who come 
as learners to Abbot Academy." 

There, I think, is the foremost reason for the greatness of Abbot. Miss 
Merrill touched on the fundamental quality of the principal and the faculty 
during the thirty-three years of Miss McKeen's regime. 

I believe a similar quality characterized the school from 1829 to 1859 
when Miss McKeen took over the leadership of the school and her formative 
influence firmly fixed the direction for succeeding years. 

This freedom for the faculty of a school; this willingness of the adminis- 
tration to admit of individuality; the sturdily worded purpose expressed in 
the original constitution of the school "to regulate the tempers, improve the 
taste, discipline and enlarge the minds" — these are the very warp and woof 
of the fabric of the school. 

I am impressed in the second place also as I read the fascinating story of 
Abbot (and I think even if I were not so close to it I should find it fascinating) 
with the way in which it has lifted itself by its own boot straps. From the year 
1828 when a group of high-minded and farseeing citizens of Andover re- 
solved that the time had come to give young women educational opportuni- 
ties similar to those given their brothers, the story of our school has been an 
inspiring one of the triumph of faith. The first Constitution concludes, 
"Trusting to the All Wise and Beneficent Disposer of events to favor this our 
humble attempt to advance the cause of human happiness, we humbly com- 
mit it to His patronage and blessing." But, with shrewd New England realism 

8 



these men and the women who were associated with them knew that the 
Lord helps those who help themselves. Their faith was buttressed by works. 
Their dreams were realized by solid underpinnings created by labor and 
personal generosity. 

Abbot Hall itself was built on one acre of land donated by a trustee. 
The building was made possible by a pledge of $1,000 by Mrs. Sarah Abbot, 
to be paid from her estate on her death. Another trustee on this security 
advanced the money needed. It was he who had put the idea into Madame 
Abbot's mind. Professor Park records that Samuel Farrar was "a technical 
lawyer and an incorrigible mathematician". He must have been, for because 
of his financial planning the roof of Abbot Hall (The Academy) was raised 
in October, 1828 and the doors opened for the first session with seventy 
pupils on May 6, 1829. Others of those first trustees were active in persuading 
the citizens of Andover to help this first incorporated Female Academy in 
New England (if not first in the country). Sarah Abbot's interest in the young 
Academy continued, encouraged by Samuel Farrar, and on her death the 
Academy received $10,109.04 from her estate. (As Dr. Calkins has re- 
marked, "How cheaply some people have bought immortality!") But like 
another immortal widow her gift was great in that she gave what she could. 

Through various and precarious emergencies the young school survived. 
And in 1850, two years after the death of Madame Abbot, Samuel Farrar 
was able to report "our debts are all honorably paid, we have our beautiful 
hall and ample grounds (still one acre!) free and clear." At this date there 
were 126 students and soon there were 180. 

In 1854 another instance of daring faith was expressed in the resolution 
of the Trustees "that it is indispensable to the prosperity and even perpetuity 
of the Academy to raise the sum of $8,000 to procure suitable accommoda- 
tions for the boarding of pupils." Until then the pupils from out of Andover 
had boarded with the local families, and from the first there had been stu- 
dents from other states — in 1832 from Georgia and Virginia and Canada. 

Somehow the money was procured by gifts and loans, and the first 
dormitory, Smith Hall (named for the largest donor, Peter Smith) was built 
directly behind Abbot Hall (which, as you know, I hope, stood originally in 
the middle of the present Circle and faced the street). The total cost of 
Smith Hall is recorded as $7,053.64 — less than the estimate! 

The next crisis was how to furnish this empty building. The wife of a 
Trustee called on a certain Andover lady and presented the problem, and we 
are told — "Mrs. Harriet Beecher Stowe threw all that glowing enthusiasm 
of which she is capable into a solution of the problem." "We must have a 
festival," she decided, and went to work. Mrs. Stowe's zeal once kindled was 
not to be quenched by practical difficulties. 

I wish there were time to read to you the account of that festival. It sur- 
passed even that of today. The proceeds were $2,000. The new house was 
furnished ready for use at the beginning of the winter term. 

In 1859, when Miss McKeen came to the school she says, "The dreari- 
ness of the Academy hall was very depressing, the floor was bare, and walls 

9 



dingy and unpapered. One small bookcase contained the entire library; 
there was a case with a few minerals; a magic lantern and a few outline 
maps." But, Miss McKeen adds, "Poverty, the early and constant foe of the 
Academy, proved herself to be the mother of invention." It was decided to 
raise money by home talent — musicals and plays. Success encouraged enter- 
prise. The hall was tastefully redecorated; new equipment was furnished; and 
by 1862 we find that there "began a record of red letter days." 

Miss McKeen's sound practicality and stubborn Vermont tenacity 
brought amazing results in the 33 years of her tenure of office. The purses 
of Trustees were opened; other citizens of Andover were generous; former 
pupils were inspired to make contributions not only of money but of books 
and beautiful and useful objects purchased on their travels at home and 
abroad; and the fine telescope erected at the top of Abbot Hall in 1875 was 
one of the first in any school. Two houses, one on each side of Abbot Hall on 
School Street were acquired for supplementary dormitories, and used re- 
spectively as a German House and a French House — South Hall and Davis. 
(South, which stood where the John Esther Gallery now stands was later 
moved to School Street and became Sunset Lodge — while Davis was taken 
down and replaced by the McKeen building in which our present Davis 
Hall is a reminder of the continued generosity of George L. Davis.) Two 
acres of land including the great oak were his gift also. These were indeed 
vigorous years for the school. Smith Hall had been enlarged as applications 
of pupils increased steadily — and still there was not room enough. 

I wish I could have known Miss McKeen. There certainly was a vein of 
iron in her, and a good deal of spice — ginger, I should say. Certain dry com- 
ments she makes from time to time in her history suggest a kind of humorous 
tartness. She says of the year 1884 "Smith Hall having been in use about 
thirty years, had suffered the ordinary wear and tear. The original plan 
being to put as many persons as possible into the least practicable space, had 
been carried out and yet there was not room for the pupils who came to us. 
Sometimes we sent a little colony of girls to a neighbor's house with a teacher 
to care for them. . . . These were old houses poorly adapted for our use. It was 
a humiliating duty to take applicants to four attic rooms whose slanting 
roofs allowed no natural place for furniture and a part of the middle space in 
the floor occupied by a chimney running up through the centre of the room." 

"No available logic was powerful enough to put newcomers upon such 
high ethical ground as to satisfy them that since they came here to study, the 
physical conditions were of little importance . . . that 'The mind is its own 
place' and that though the light of the room was insufficient.. . .'He that 
hath light in his own clear breast may sit in the centre and enjoy bright day !' ' 
And she adds, "We used to wish that it was one of the prerogatives of the 
Trustees to show parents and new pupils to the rooms assigned." 

For a good many years Miss McKeen had urged this serious need upon 
the Trustees. Finally she made such a strong case, with specifications for the 
new buildings she felt the school should have, that the Board appointed ap- 
propriate committees. Architects were chosen (the famous firm of Hartley 



10 



and Richardson) and sketches drawn up (for three connecting buildings). 
Then came the main question! $150,000 was thought to be the amount 
needed. How was the money to be raised? Imagine Miss McKeen's con- 
sternation (as she herself says) when she received one day in 1884 a communi- 
cation from the Board of Trustees saying that it was the earnest desire of the 
Board that she should take an active part in raising this money and that they 
would give her a leave of absence in order that she could do so. 

Miss McKeen says that to go out as a soliciting agent for the school was 
abhorrent to her, but with her customary forthrightness and conviction she 
made her preparations and set out upon her journey, going as far west as 
Pittsburgh. 

She remarks, however, "It seemed to me eminently suitable that the 
Trustees should head my lists as vouchers for the usefulness of the school. My 
first call was made on one of the Trustees who had been absent when the 
members made their subscriptions and my third call was made on an ex- 
Trustee." Each of these gentlemen subscribed $1,000 and Miss McKeen was 
much encouraged. But she was to encounter many depressing days, many 
ups and downs. In New York, incidentally, the meeting of old girls was held 
at Delmonico's, in a very elegant and impressive setting, but the meeting was 
disappointing as a violent rainstorm raged and the attendance was seriously 
affected. Still over $5,000 was subscribed. All gifts had been pledged con- 
tingent on the total of at least $100,000 being raised. It was clear when July 
first came that the goal was far off. In this emergency an electrifying letter 
was received by the Trustees. It read:. . ."I propose to increase my sub- 
scription from $3,000 to $25,000." The letter was signed Warren F. Draper. 
That is why this building was named Draper Hall. The two other buildings, 
a French and a German residence hall, were given up. But it was now possible 
to go ahead with the main building. 

In 1887 Smith Hall was moved to where the Infirmary now stands and in 
1888 Abbot Hall was moved to its present position, and Miss McKeen had 
the joy of lifting the first spadeful of earth for the excavation of Draper Hall. 
But the succeeding months were a nightmare. As Miss McKeen describes the 
time: "Level ground was diversified by mortar beds; lower deeps were yawn- 
ing in the uncovered cellars of Smith Hall and the Academy Hall. Debris 
scattered everywhere was a snare to unwary feet so that a scene simply lugu- 
brious by day was positively dangerous in the dark; our friends dreaded to 
enter the grounds; and horses were frightened by new complications. Miss 
Merrill and her French family at Davis Hall and we at Smith Hall were 
absolutely separated after nightfall. Telegrams were coming from fathers to 
daughters 'Unless nuisances are immediately abated come home.'" 

But the students did not leave, and "the experience of these two years," 
Miss McKeen adds, "was a severe and satisfactory test of the cohesive power 
of the school." 

The next crisis and one that was again met by sheer faith, will, and 
hard work, was that of furnishing this huge building when it was completed. 
The school had no reserves for such a purpose (nor for any purpose). I wish 

T T 






there were time to tell you how the rooms for over a hundred girls and 
teachers, and all the public rooms, including the music rooms and art 
rooms were finally equipped. Miss McKeen says that she spent many a 
sleepless, wearisome night in turning over and over the question of ways and 
means. "Room after room passed in melancholy procession before me." 

But the Mason Drawing Room; the Lilian Holbrook Music Rooms; the 
Antoinette Hall Taylor Guest Room, "Nettie", suggest today the names of 
some of the friends who responded to this emergency. 

Somehow the necessary contributions came in cash to furnish the girls 
bedrooms and many old girls and friends responded also with other furnish 
ings, pictures, books, pianos, and desks — everything from pianos to ink 
stands — and at the beginning of 1891, 1,000 invitations were sent out for a 
gala housewarming, and the party was a great event in the history of the 
school. The triumph of faith again. 

The period of Modern Abbot may then be said to have begun. To man\ 
of you here the early years of the 20th Century must seem far from modern 
But with Miss McKeen's retirement to Sunset Lodge, and after her death in 
1898 somehow a new era seems to have begun. Already the school was on its 
way to its centennial — at least it had passed its three score years and ten. 

At the end of Miss McKeen's history she wrote with the same creative 
faith that had characterized all her years at Abbot. "The friends of the school 
rejoice in the beautiful new building (Draper Hall) . . . but the good work 
should not stop here nor falter until a new Academy (classroom building) is 
built. This is urgently needed to furnish sufficient and suitable recitation 
rooms and a large audience room for the many occasions which attract 
friends in great numbers to the school. A fund for this purpose is begun — a 
legacy of $5,000 from Mrs. Phoebe Chandler who was one of the original 
members of the school, to which some additions have already been made, is 
an encouragement to generous contributions from all who know and love 
the school." 

This call did not go unheeded. As always through the history of the 
school the challenge of its need, confidence in its importance, and faith that 
working together its daughters and its friends could meet the need were 
sufficient, and in 1904 the handsome spacious McKeen Building was com 
plete with the fine auditorium given by George L. Davis — a tribute to 
Miss Philena McKeen and her sister, Miss Phoebe. Except for Davis Hall, 
the building was largely paid for by contributions from old girls. 

The next two major physical changes in the plant came primarily as 
gifts from two families — the John Esther Gallery, given by the will of Esther 
Smith Byers in 1904 and the Antoinette Hall Taylor Infirmary given in 191 4 
by Professor and Mrs. Taylor in memory of their daughter. 

Then came the celebration of the school's Centennial — remarkable, 
not only because we were 100 years old but especially because on that occa 
sion a magnificent expression of loyalty and confidence proved again that 
Abbot has primarily created itself. The Alumnae Association presented to 

12 



Miss Bailey in 1929 the Centennial gift, which they hacl been building for 
ten years — $169,000 for the endowment of teaching. 

And here I have come to a third division in this rapid survey - - the 
third cornerstone of the invisible school that is Abbot Academy, and that is 
the affection and loyalty and generosity of its graduates. These qualities were 
exhibited far earlier than the origin of any formal alumnae organization. But 
this loyalty and liberality were concentrated into effective organization over 
80 years ago. In 1871 at a meeting of old girls it was voted to form an Alum- 
nae Association. "The object was to be to keep alive the interest of old 
scholars in each other and in the school and in female education generally 
and to contribute a fund to the school from time to time to be used for en- 
riching the teaching program of the school." 

Surely no school for girls has had a body of Alumnae who valued more 
the effect on their lives of their school days than the vast majority of Abbot 
girls do. Of recent years aside from the many warm expressions of apprecia- 
tion that have come to me, the annual Alumnae Fund, developing now 
steadily in amount and in participation, is concrete evidence of this apprecia- 
tion of a debt to the school and conviction as to the value of the work the 
school is doing. 

The great teachers — men and women; the principals and trustees of 
the past century — their visions and faith and labors have brought about 
this loyalty and liberality on the part of the girls who have been educated 
here. 

But it is not sentiment alone that has accomplished this. Aside from the 
character and ability of the founders and their successors; in addition to the 
faith and works that built the school, and the loyalty of its graduates, one is 
impressed with the adherence to the original purpose of the school as ex- 
pressed by the first trustees that in this school "Solid acquirements shall 
always have precedence of those which are merely showy, and the useful of 
those which are merely ornamental." 

And by useful I cannot discover that "vocational" was in any sense in- 
tended. I cannot discover that in any period of its history Abbot by any 
stretch of imagination could have been called a "finishing school". The 
course of study was a thoroughly serious one. 

The first printed schedule of the Curriculum, printed in 1836, reads as 
follows: "Adams Arithmetic; Bailey and Day's Algebra; Playfair's Euclid; Inger- 
soll's and Webster's English Grammar; Huntington's Geography; Burritt's 
Geography of the Heavens; Smellie's Philosophy of Natural History; Olmstead's 
Natural Philosophy; Lincoln's Botany; Comstock's Chemistry; Wayland's Moral 
Science; and Abercrombie's The Intellectual Powers. 

In the earliest days there was an elementary department. But the school 
was soon limited to what we call the high school age and students that today 
we would consider freshmen and sophomores in college. 

In 1839 we find all branches of History introduced and national and 
state government; and Butler's Analogy of Natural and Revealed Religion, 

13 



which for many years caused many a groan and doubtless the illicit late 
burning of many an oil lamp. 

In 1854 before English Literature had been admitted to the curriculum 
of most schools or colleges (before included at Mt. Holyoke College as a 
formal study) Abbot introduced a four-year course: (1) History and Analysis 
of the English Language; (2) Early English Literature; (3) Literature of the 
Elizabethan Age; (4) English Literature from the Elizabethan Age to the 
Present. 

In 1862 an outline of Oriental, classical, and modern European litera- 
ture was added. 

As Miss McKeen says, "Any outlook over so vast a field must, of course, 
be superficial; but it serves to teach the young student that the world is large 
and that all wisdom did not begin and will not die with us." 

The languages became an important part of the curriculum — Greek 
and Latin including the usual authors and in addition Sallust, Livy, Horace, 
and Juvenal; and modern languages. I have referred to the existence of 
French and German Halls in which only these languages were spoken except 
for two hours a day. I find that in the early days Voltaire was one of the 
favorite French authors studied ! And really distinguished teaching seems, at 
least for 75 years, to have characterized the course in History of Art, and the 
work in Music. 

Surely this is a sound intellectual heritage for a school: and in the 
early days when there were many who feared there might be dangerous 
effects upon young women who were to devote themselves to such serious in- 
tellectual effort, it is amusing to read Miss McKeen's slightly acid remark: 
"So far as we are able to trace the former members of the school, the best 
educated of them seem to have no less physical ability than the more ignorant 
to bear all the burdens and fulfill all the functions of life." 

One of the school's distinguished graduates, Miss Anna Dawes, wrote 
years after her graduation, "There was something in the very atmosphere of 
the school which developed an immense enthusiasm for study; a vital and 
growing interest in particular branches; a knowledge of methods of study; 
there was laid a solid foundation; there was created a great desire for ac- 
complishment; there was given the tool and the knowledge of its use. . . .We 
were taught to be intellectual women; we were almost obliged to make for 
ourselves noble characters. Precept and example; direction, inspiration, en- 
couragement — nothing was wanting. ... I freely confess my debt to Abbot 
Academy, its teachers, its scholars, its friends for much that has made my 
life worth living; for friendships that have stood the sharpest tests; for in- 
tellectual vigor and furnishing; for much molding of character; for Christian 
care and guidance." 

I can imagine a no more desirable accomplishment for a school than 
this. If, during this 20th Century, we have in any degree approached this 
goal; if during the coming half century the school can be worthy of this 
heritage, we shall continue to have an indispensable part to play in the educa- 

14 



tional world. But as Goethe has said, "What we have inherited from the 
fathers we must earn in order to possess." 

After a somewhat anomalous period when the colleges for women had 
fully developed and there seemed to be a steadily decreasing place for Abbot 
as a school of higher education; and the Junior colleges began to become 
stabilized as a part of our educational system, Abbot settled down to its 
present function as a college preparatory school. For the foreseeable future 
this seems to be our field. With the new and interesting studies that are 
being made of the correlation between school and college, Abbot should, I 
feel, be able to make a valuable contribution. With Phillips Academy as our 
neighbor, it is conceivable that we might even return to some of the mutual 
academic coordination that existed in the early years ! 

To conclude now this survey of the development of our school : 

From that extremely modest beginning — one building on one acre of 
unimproved land — we find the faith of those pioneers amazingly fulfilled in 
the school of today. In the last fifteen years Abbey House, the new Wing of 
Draper with its handsome and well stocked library and this beautiful dining 
room honoring earlier principals, Miss Means and Miss Bailey, as well as that 
rarely gifted teacher, Miss Rebekah Ghickering — have come to being 
again only with the labor and love and generosity of you and your classmates 
and others who believe in Abbot. 

Tonight we are looking to the immediate future with another venture of 
faith. For our much needed gymnasium we have received the largest single 
gift in our history for a building. To obtain the sum necessary to build the 
gymnasium will require the thought and work and sacrifice of old girls and 
friends and trustees in as great a measure as in the days I have described in 
the past. We shall be honoring a man named George E. Abbot, in erecting 
this building — not a descendant of Sarah Abbot; she had no children — 
but a man whose life, like that of his forebears was deeply rooted in Andover 
and of late years deeply devoted to our school. But we shall be paying tribute, 
too, to that great company of the past — who by faith obtained a good re- 
port but whose work without us cannot be made perfect. 

It has become a cliche to remark that a school or a college is not its 
buildings; that a Mark Hopkins at one end of a log and a student at the other 
is all that is needed for a complete education. But though theoretically this is 
true, when one faces reality one remembers those crowded attic rooms of 
which Miss McKeen spoke; and one knows that neither that boy nor Mark 
Hopkins could sit indefinitely on the end of the log without getting very cold 
and very stiff and without losing his mens Sana in a cor pore non sano. 

In other words, Abbot needs a gymnasium ! In the winter months we 
have far too little weather when skiing or skating is possible; in the spring and 
fall we have many rainy days and other days when the grounds cannot be 
used for games. We have to have three sections of Physical Education going 
on at once in two periods in the afternoon. For indoor work we use our pre- 
sent gymnasium; we use the old dining room; and we use the basement corri- 

15 



dor of the McKeen building for simultaneous classes. We cannot have basket- 
ball in the winter because the "gymnasium" is not long enough for a regula- 
tion size court (and dangerous). The use of Davis Hall as a gymnasium and 
an auditorium results in insoluble conflicts which limit the smooth running of 
these departments. The Hall is supposed to be free for play rehearsals on 
Wednesday afternoons, Friday nights, and Saturday mornings. If it rains, 
there is no gymnasium available for the girls. If a student recital is scheduled, 
the performers need to use the Hall for practice; if an artist is giving a pro- 
gram on a Saturday night, he or she often needs to use the stage in the 
afternoon; and whenever the Hall is to be used as an auditorium, several 
hundred heavy chairs have to be set up and then taken down again so that 
the floor can be kept clear for the use of the room as a gymnasium. These are 
a few of our problems. A new gym will provide space and equipment for 
exercise and games for the whole school in bad weather, and on weekends. 
Moreover, in releasing space in McKeen on the ground floor, additional, 
much needed classroom space will become available. I could go on with 
more reasons to make the case. THE FACT IS WE VERY MUCH 
NEED THE NEW GYMNASIUM, and I am confident that, as in the 
past, our need will be victoriously met. 

I have talked too long, I fear. Let me conclude with just this thought. 
Change there has indeed been in the long years of Abbot's history. The early 
trustees and principals and students would be astounded if they could see 
what has happened in these 125 years; even during the last twenty-five years 
many of you have seen remarkable changes — in buildings, in the faculty, 
and in social customs. That this is good and healthy I am sure you all be- 
lieve. There is no reason to doubt that in the next half century changes as 
startling will occur. I hope so. But 

"Where ancient ivy weaves its mysteries 
Mutation leaves not any mark at all. . . 
Only new faces tilt to the first star, 
Fresh Laughter echoes, other voices sing; 
Still wisdom echoes in the whispered stir 
Of trees we knew. . ." 

And 

"On our heels a fresh perfection treads, 
A power more strong in beauty, born of us 
And fated to excel us." 



16 



Address 

Margaret Clapp 

President of Wellesley College and Trustee of Abbot Academy 

We are celebrating the one hundred twenty-fifth anniversary of a re- 
markable school — remarkable for longevity, vigor, the flexibility of suc- 
cessive faculties and heads in meeting the needs of their time, and for per- 
sistence in seeking to provide the best education it can conceive for the girls 
in its charge. 

An anniversary is a time for pride in the past of an institution and for re- 
calling the bonds of friendships and interests which you in your school days 
formed here and even for recalling stern lessons in acceptance and courage 
which you must have encountered here and which are a necessary part of 
growth. An anniversary is also as a sheltered ledge to a mountain climber. It 
provides room to look forward as well as back. Indeed, the more splendid 
what preceded, the stronger the urge to look ahead, the greater the responsi- 
bility to make the future a fair complement to the past. It is of the future 
which I would talk tonight — not only of the specific future of Abbot 
Academy but of education throughout this country in the period ahead. 
Abbot Academy and Abbot alumnae, as a small yet significant part of our 
total educational pattern, can best chart the future of this school by looking 
at the total picture and placing Abbot within the context of the whole. More- 
over, the value of the education which Abbot gave you may be measured in 
part by the responsibility you take as mature women in the educational 
problems confronting all citizens. 

You know something of what lies ahead in terms of numbers to be edu- 
cated. Those of you with small children are painfully aware of the problem. 
Elementary schools are bursting at the seams. Perhaps you recall the cartoon 
depicting a youngster saying to a passerby who is looking at a building with 
bulging walls and children half falling out of every window: "Yes, sir, I'm in 
the fourth grade, third shift, second layer." Back in the 1930's the birth rate 
in this country was about two and one-half million a year. Last year it 
reached about four million. Before the war some sixteen million youngsters 
were in elementary schools. By i960 there will be about thirty million chil- 
dren in America of elementary school age. 

In response to popular demands and by concerted efforts of communi- 
ties and states more and more of the children graduating from elementary 
schools are going to high schools. By now the high school population has 
reached close to seven million. Experts estimate that within the next decade 
the number of boys and girls in secondary schools will exceed twelve million. 

In response to popular demand and by concerted efforts of local com- 
munities and states more of the young people graduating from high schools 
are going on to higher education. There are now somewhat over two million 
young men and women in institutions of higher education. Experts predict 

17 



that in the next decade the number will exceed three million, will approach 
four million. 

What are we Americans going to do about it? The question has two 
parts: What can we do? What should we do? It is to the latter that I would 
speak. This is because I think it is very much easier to do things than to de- 
cide what should be done, to move forward once direction is ascertained 
than to determine direction. If we want to, we can provide the buildings and 
desks and books and other equipment; the children and youth. That is, we 
can if we want to do it so much that we are willing to put a larger share of 
every dollar into education. This is more easily said than done, because it 
requires curtailing, or at least not expanding, in some other line. It requires 
democratic decision as to what matters most — whether it be money and 
materials for schools, roads, defense, cosmetics, bureaucratic red tape and 
filing cabinets, hospitals, welfare agencies, assistance to other free peoples. 

Suppose we do this, and suppose we do provide the facilities for educa- 
tion. What are we going to do with these young people once in schools and 
colleges? First — who is going to teach them? I suggest that some of you 
sitting here tonight will have to join the teaching force. On all sides we hear 
of the shortage in elementary school teachers, not in most wealthy communi- 
ties to be sure, but in altogether too many American communities. I have not 
accurate figures, but I am told that the number of new teachers being added 
these years on the elementary and secondary school levels is just about 
balanced by the number withdrawing from teaching through retirement, 
through marriage, or to enter other fields. The school population is increasing 
far out of proportion to the teaching population. 

The first to suffer are the poor communities where salaries are lowest and 
where, on the average, cultural background is least. These communities 
which are hit the hardest are exactly the places where special skill is needed 
in the schools to compensate for cultural lacks in homes and other institu- 
tions. Yet teachers prepared for work in elementary schools have every 
economic and social incentive to go to the cities. Then, in the cities, when 
salaries are lowest for those who teach the youngest (for those, that is, who 
have the most influence on the young) every incentive confronts the teacher 
to accept up-grading — to move from elementary to junior high, or from 
junior high to senior high, in order to have an increase in economic return 
and a reduction in responsibility for the basic formulation of attitudes and 
character. Let community colleges or junior colleges increase in number, as 
seems likely, and in turn high school teachers will be drained off to serve on 
the higher level. 

What does this mean to the future of America and to the children and 
youth for whose good education all of the facilities are intended? Somehow 
we must increase the number of good teachers on all levels of education or 
find substitutes for them. We can speed up teacher training and develop 
further the programs already under way to learn on the job through an 
apprentice system. We can defer retirement and are already doing it in a 
number of places. We can try to educate by remote control using television - 

18 



and radio - teachers, reaching thousands of children. But reflect for a mo- 
ment on your school days. How important were the aids to learning as com- 
pared to direct relationship with an adult whom you respected, whose re- 
spect you wanted, and who knew and cared about you? 

Every means which we can find to spread the influence of our good 
teachers is useful. Every means by which we can keep teachers in the profes- 
sion and bring promising youth into the profession is useful. And there is 
more to be done. — Will you show by raising hands how many of you have 
had a one - year course or more of a science on the college level? According 
to a statement made the other day by the head of a major scientific center, 
you have studied more science on an advanced level than the national aver- 
age for teachers of science in elementary and secondary schools today. — 
We must pull back into our schools or bring in for the first time some of the 
college-educated, mature women whose children are old enough no longer to 
require their full attention. It is not a question of whether women need the 
work. It is the work which needs the women. 

This means refresher courses for some women and first courses in educa- 
tion for others. It means organizing in your town or city and in your state to 
abolish restrictive requirements which keep out of our schools women of 
ability, character, education, and good personality, without abolishing es- 
sential standards of professional competence. It means for administrators a 
glad acceptance of the problem of part - time colleagues. It means individual 
direct action by people whose home responsibilities permit outside activity, 
not merely a multiplication of discussion committees talking about how to 
inspire others to work in the schools. If I seem to you to be using this occasion 
for a piece of special pleading, I am glad of it. This is precisely what I am 
trying to do. 

The crowding now evident in elementary schools is beginning to be 
evident in high schools. By i960 it will reach the colleges. Here the problem 
of adequate instruction will be just as critical, because, though the influence 
of the professor on the late adolescent is on the whole less formative than 
that of the primary teacher, the time needed to prepare for advanced teach- 
ing is considerably greater. Now is the time to encourage able youth to con- 
tinue with graduate work, for opportunity to use their education lies ahead. 
We cannot wait until i960 to do this. It takes less time to build an entire 
campus than to build the advanced education of a college teacher. If we 
want to have in our colleges and universities an adequate number of people 
with the necessary specialization to transmit and advance knowledge, we 
must plan now. All the more necessary is early planning if we want these 
specialists also to be persons of cultivated mind and generous heart who have 
pondered the mysteries of purpose and meaning and are ready to help young 
people, in their turn, to develop their abilities and principles, to discipline 
their minds and enrich their spirits, and to learn methods and skills essential 
to achievement. 

The picture is frightening in one sense, rather glorious in another. If we 
are heedless, the vast majority of the children born in 1 945, for example, will 

19 



not have a single year of schooling in their whole lives under as good condi- 
tions as we had in all or almost every year of our schooling. The glorious part 
is that, if America's demands continue as now, a far larger percentage of the 
children born in 1 945 will have opportunity for many more years of schooling 
than did the children born when we were born. 

This leads directly to another issue. What are these millions of young 
people to learn? Who is to decide? Should any one decide? And should there 
be any one decision? Obviously one has better automobiles at lower cost 
when a single model is adopted. But education is not manufacturing. Educa- 
tion is concerned with human beings, with unique entities living in a many- 
sided, interdependent society. Nothing could be more harmful to the full 
development of youth and the advance of our society than adoption of a 
single pattern in education under pressure of the numbers to be educated. 

The history of our country rests in part on the quantity and variety of 
its natural resources. It rests far more on the use of those resources by a 
people rich in diversity of aptitude, inventiveness, interest, and ambition. 
Take away that diversity and our strength is gone, the purpose for which we 
established our government, the blessing of liberty, is meaningless. Limit 
diversity by holding youth in increasing numbers in schools and colleges 
without providing for interests and aptitudes which become increasingly 
diverse as free people approach maturity, and we weaken the nation. Our 
strength lies in diversity of opportunity and in skill in connecting each indi- 
vidual with the type of opportunity best for him. 

Fears are rampant in this country today, and there are reasons for us to 
be fearful. To preserve ourselves in strength we build offensive weapons and 
defensive weapons which have immediate utility. Many among us even 
urge throttling our enemies and keeping their ideas from our selves and our 
fellows, as one would a plague. Yet in the long run our strength lies where it 
always has — in unthrottling ourselves from the chains of ignorance and the 
chains of frustration which are welded by undeveloped, unusual abilities. 
Our strength lies in freeing more and more of our people from selfishness and 
prejudice, by educating them in knowledge of themselves and their world 
that they may live usefully in serenity of spirit. 

No single type of institution be it public or private, liberal or vocational, 
can help all young people toward this goal. Nor can the contribution of an 
institution be measured merely by its output in numbers. It is better mea- 
sured by the effectiveness of the education which it gives those who enter its 
doors and by their later usefulness to themselves and society. 

With this in mind look briefly at this school. You know it far better than 
I. Yet perhaps I, less close to it, can speak more easily. Among my friends are 
Abbot graduates, among our students are Abbot graduates, and I know 
their caliber. As a junior trustee I know something of the quality of leader- 
ship and integrity which resides in it. In the years ahead when tax money 
for public education will be an increased obligation on us all, let us not forget 
the Abbots of America. We need them. We need schools which insist on high 
standards of intellectual and personal life, which will not cater to mediocrity, 

20 



which will let a very able girl enrich her program, and will let another girl 
develop with equal satisfaction at her best rate. We need schools that can 
call forth in our young people qualities of persistence and thoroughness and 
that encourage use of imaginative talent. We need schools that can shift 
emphases, freely and immediately, without the restriction of an imposed 
curriculum, as the changing times demand. 

Many of these things, fortunately, will be possible in many of our public 
schools and colleges. But not in all, not when the level of ability and sheer 
numbers in a given place must affect its offerings. As citizens our duty is to 
support the public institutions. As citizens and as alumnae of independent 
institutions who know their unique values, we ought also to support inde- 
pendent education which can serve as pattern, as safeguard, and as stimulus 
to the whole educational world. 

I hope we keep strong the traditional freedom of our schools and colleges. 
The classic role of our liberal schools and colleges has been to transmit the 
cultural heritage and in the higher institution, to serve as centers to inquire, 
to think, to doubt, to test answers, to form conclusions on evidence, and to 
change conclusions as new evidence warrants. For centuries it is, has been, 
the free questing mind, centered in the colleges and universities which has 
contributed the humane values and scientific knowledge on which our 
civilization rests. The degree to which this continues will measure, I believe, 
the degree of strength in our secondary schools and the sureness that the 
basic values in our tradition will grow in depth and strength. 

It is up to us — to what we provide for ourselves and for the generations 
who succeed us. 



Cum Laude 1954 



Martha Jane Church 
Louise Marie de Gholnoky 
Lucy Reed Garretson 
Anna Louise Hewlett 
Margaret Phillips Johnson 
Winifred Elizabeth Johnson 
Sarah Lovell Jones 



Lucy Hayes Morley 
Ann Merrill Norwood 
Paula Elaine Prial 
Patricia Flagg Sanborn 
Gretchen Vicky Schwab 
Jacqueline Wei 
Joan Wheeler 



2T 



Reunion Groups 




1904 

Back row, left to right — Ruth Lane Treadway, Julia Wallace Gage, Mary Byers Smith, Verta 

Smith Etz, Elizabeth Schneider, Sarah M. Field 
Front row, left to right — Eleanor Duncan, Mary Davis Lee 



22 




*9*4 

Left to right — Elsie Gleason Sloan, Louise Allaman Austin, Marie Winsor Appleby, Katharine 
Selden McDuffie, Helen Hamblet Dyer, Emma Holt Garside 




Left to right — Rena Atwood Benson, Harriette Woolverton Robinson, Mattie Larrabee Whitte- 
more, Muriel Baker Wood, Marion Barnard Cole, Marion M. Brooks, Catherine Leach, 
Betty Leach, Jessie Nye Blodgett, Freda Joslin Sprague, Charlotte Morris Perot, Phyllis 
Brooks Stevens. 



23 




igi6 

Left to right — Alice Prescott Plumb, Eugenia Parker, Grace Merrill Emery, Dorothy Pillsbury 
Bartlett, Dorothy Higgins Rand, Katharine Odell Randall, Helene Hardy Bobst, Bernice 
Overend Merrill, Marion Mellor Dean, Dorothy G. Niles, Helene Sands Brown, Mildred 
Jenkins Dalrymple, Helen D. McCarthy '11, Esther L. Kilton, Miss Hearsey, Vera L. 
Allen, Charlotte Eaton 




i9 J 7 

Left to right — Cornelia Sargent Battershill, Carita Bigelow Moore, Frances Gere, Edith Mars- 
den, Miriam Bacon Chellis, Bernice Boutwell Parsons 



24 




i 9 i8 

Left to right — Dorothy Stalker, Marion McPherson, Clarissa Horton Sanford, Louise Bacon 
Fuller, Julie Sherman Tibbetts, Irene Atwood, May Bartlett, Gwendolen Brooks Reynolds, 
Helen Martin Thomas, Margaret Van Voorhis, Velma Rowell Cutler 




!9 J 9 
Left to right — Katharine Coe Taylor, Gladys Glendenning Loveland, Charlotte Copeland Gray, 
Kathreen Noyes Pettit, Gretchen Brown Knights, Kathryn Beck Dow, Mildred Frost 
Eaton, Josephine Hamilton Leach, Jane Holt Atkinson, Marea Blackford Fowler, Geraldine 
Murray Stanton, Muriel Johnson Lovejoy, Margaret Clark Howe 



2=\ 




1 921 

Left to right — Ethel Dixon McGee, Elizabeth Weld Bennett, Dorothy Martin Buracher, Edith 
Page Bennett, Marion Kimball Bigelow, Frances Gasser Stover, Mildred Peabody, Helen 
Bruno Clegg, Marion Cleveland Botsford 




1922 
Left to right — Gwendolyn Bloomfield Tillson, Elizabeth Hutchinson Bluntschli, Jane Baldwin, 
Mary Mallory Pattison, Barbara Goss, Alice Tower Kirkby, Ruth Dewey York, Olive 
Howard Vance, Margaret Potter Kensinger, Florence Phillips Cooke, Sally Bodwell 
Houghton, Carol Iredell, Geneva Burr Sanders 

26 




1924 

Back row, left to right — Elizabeth Bragg Mcintosh, Sybil Bottomley Talman, Katherine Hart 
Mitchell, Eleanore Ireland Saunders, Frances Butler, Priscilla Draper Mansfield 

Front row, left to right — Helen Epler Baketel, Ruth Pritchard de Rivera, Ruth Beach Newsom, 
Marjorie Wolfe Staples, Elizabeth Willson Naetzker 




1929 
Clockwise — Martha Tuttle Haigis, Katherine Kennedy Beardsley, Katherine Blunt Polsby, 
Mary Eaton Graf, Jean Stewart, Rosamond Wheeler, Lois Hardy Daloz, Bettina Rollins 
Wheeler, Dorothy Newcomb Rogers, Grace Stephens, Estelle Levering Chestnut, Jane Linn 
Gale, Polly Francis Loesch, Cleone Place Tiffany, Millicent Smith Uppvall, Peg Neville 
Batchelder, Ruth Shulze Hammond, Gertrude Campion Soutar, Catherine McDonnell, 
Frances Cobb Russell, Betty Taylor Amazeen 



27 




!930 
Left to right — Betty Southworth Sutton, Donna Brace Kroeck, Grace Hadley MacMillan, Bar- 
bara Lord Mathias, Barbara Healey Holland, Mary Jane Owsley Warwick, Marjorie Turner 
Fisher, Margery Hart Cory, Ruth Baker Johnson, Florence Gardner Balius, Mary Shepard 
Wiley, Barbara Lamson Cummings, Elizabeth Tarr Morse, Kathie Fellows Ingraham, 
Eleanor Ritchie Brown, Helen Ripley, Hortense Dunbar 




1934 
Left to right — Ann Place Henderson, Barbara Ritzman Devereux, Molly Savage Van Stone. 
Dorothy Lambert Robinson, Elizabeth Wheeler Nelson, Sally O'Reilly Loria, Katharine 
Damon Reed, Mary Rockwell Stewart 

28 




1936 

Clockwise — Mary Swan, Mary Trafton Simonds, Lucy Hawkes Lamson, Phyllis Fisher Tobey, 
Polly Spear Chapin, Sally Scates Phelan, Betty Sargent Crandell, Sally Burns Bowen, Mary 
Dooley Bragg 




J937 
Left to right — Louise Risley Stever, Martha Ransom Tucker, Elizabeth Melcher Anderson, 
Nancy Burns McArdle, Ruth Rose StothofT, Lucy Hulburd Richardson, Priscilla Wonson 
Hahn 



2 9 




*944 
Back row, left to right — Shirley Rhodes Lowe, Betty Colson Tierney, Charlotte Trow Young, 

Carol Paradise 
Front row, left to right — Charlotte Leland, Aagot Hinrichsen Cain, Patricia Damon Niswander, 

Priscilla Stevens Rutherford 





Class 


Reunion Gifts 




1884 


1 25 


[914 


119 




T 934 


189 


1886 


175 


t9 J 5 


195 




!935 


70.50 


1889 


77-5° 


[916 


43° 




J 93 6 


42 


1894 


33 


i9 J 7 


34 




J937 


95 


1896 


100. 


[918 


300 




1938 


107 


1899 


156 


l 9*9 


i97 




T 939 


156 


1900 


55 


1920 


122 




1940 


64.50 


1901 


281 


[921 


74 




1 941 


9° -5° 


1902 


53 


[922 


143 




1942 


102 


1903 


7o 


923 


208 




1943 


97.22 


1904 


492 1 


[924 


49 




!944 


69 


1905 


45 ] 


925 


61 




*945 


97-5° 


1906 


57 1 


926 


180 




1946 


54 


1907 


61 i 


927 


84 




1947 


138 


1908 


150 i 


928 


89 




1948 


132 


!9Q9 


141 ] 


929 


3 J 4- 


50 


*949 


52 


1910 


165 ] 


93° 


118 




!95° 


62 


1911 


175-5° ] 


93 1 


IJ 5 




I95 1 


47 


1912 


50 ] 


932 


7i 




*95 2 


59 . 


1913 


*54 ] 


933 


i37- 


12 


J 953 


25 



Boston Abbot Club $210.74 New York Abbot Club Si 03. 74 

Old Colony Abbot Club $25.00 
Congratulations to Esther Kilton, 191 6, whose class with 32 contributors 
had the largest number of individuals giving to the Fund 

30 



FINAL REPORT 

ABBOT SECOND CENTURY ALUMNAE FUND 

1953-1954 

Total - - $6891.39 
675 Contributors 



Additional Contributions 
to Alumnae Fund 

February 1, 1954 -May 6, 1954 



1889 
Flora Mason 

1894 
Katherine Lahm Parker 

1899 
Ruth Childs Young 

1901 
Harriet A. Lee 

1903 
Christine Peine Douglas 

1904 
Ma r y Davis Lee 
Laura Eddy McCabe 
Emily Stearns Giese 

1907 
Jean McEwen Brown 

Mary Bourne Boutell 

1910 
Lydia Skolfield Parsons 

1911 
Dorothy Eigelow Arms 
Marion Brown 
Helen Hart Hurlbert 
Margaret Strong Hill 
Henrietta Wiest Zaner 
Jessie Wightman Jones 
Corinne Willard Dresser 

1912 
Nora Sweeney 



1914 
Rosamond Gens Lehnert 
Ella Stohn Getchell 
Alice Sweeney 

1916 
Eleanor Erary Rogers 
Grace Merrill Emery 
Bernice Overend Merrill 
Margaret Perry James 

1917 
Dorothy Baxter Lare 

Mary Wuichet De Armon 

1918 

Dorothy Stalker 

1919 
Katharine Coe Taylor 
Elisabeth Luce Moore 

1920 
Katherine Hamblet 

1921 
Elinor Cochrane Knight 
Frances Gasser Stover 

1922 
Marion Saunders Cheesborough 

1926 
Gracie Griffin Westman 

1927 
Gertrude Holbrook 

J 93i 
Dorothy Hunt Bassett 
Marcia Rudd Keil 
Gertrud Van Peursem Bell 



1932 
Eunice H. Randall 

*934 
Katharine Damon Reed 
Nancy Marsh Gares 
Sarah O'Reilly Loria 
Barbara Ritzman Devereux 

1935 
Susan Hildreth Goodwin 

1936 
Barbara Reinhart Livingston 
Mary Swan 

1938 
Jean Tilton Melby 

1941 
Jane Philbin Dreyfuss 

*944 
Emily McMurray Mead 

*945 
Hilary Paterson Cleveland 

1947 
Joy Kolins Peisch 

1948 
Nancy Nalle 

*949 
Ann Chivers Stevens 
Carlotita Gonzalez Mann 

Past Faculty 
Gladys Ortstein 

Trustees 
Rev. Sidney Lovett 
Stoddard M. Stevens 



31 



Alumnae Exhibitors 

Exhibit Arranged by Andree Luce 1945 

Creative Work 

Miniature, Oil Painting, Water Color, and Original Design Book Plate — 

Alice Jenkins 1886 
Pastel — Evelyn Carter Giles 1901 

Memorial Exhibit of Five Oil Paintings — Clara Thomson Knox 1901 
4 Oil Paintings — Miriam Carpenter 1 902 
Graduation Dress — Sarah M. Field 1904 
Chinese Pattern Hooked Rug — Marjory Bond Crowley 1907 
Upholstered Chair — Mildred Bryant Kussmaul 191 3 
Handwoven Apron — Cornelia Crittenden 191 3 
Oil Painting — Mattie Larrabee Whittemore 191 5 
Oil Painting — Dorothy Higgins Rand 191 6 
Pencil Illustration from Boy of Babylon — Frances K. Gere 191 7 
Oil Painting and Hooked Stairway Runner (Each riser depicting a place 

where the Fullers have lived) — Louise Bacon Fuller 191 8 
Decorated Trays — Margaret Clark Howe 191 9 
Water Color — Katharine Coe Taylor 191 9 
Oil Painting and Water Color — Harriette Harrison 191 9 
Oil Painting — Jane Holt Atkinson 191 9 
Decorated Tray — Edna Dixon Mansur 1920 
Decorated Tray and Water Color — Dorothea Flagg Smith 1922 
Two Oil Paintings — Olive Howard Vance 1922 
Decorated Trays and Boxes — Eva Cross Glendenning 1925 
Hitchcock Chair, Water Color, and Restored Antique Tray Belonging to 

great-great-grandmother — Frances Flagg Sanborn 1926 
Flower Arrangements — Marjorie Knowlton Hollis 1927 
Stuffed Animal and Woven Basket — Charlotte Marland 1931 
Flower Arrangements — Helen Cutler Appleton 1932 
Two Caseins — Lloyd Pierce Smith 1939 
Four Monoprints — Tove Dithmer 1950 
Oil Painting — Betsy Waskowitz 1952 

Publications 

Translation into French of In His Name by Edward Everett Hale — Mary 

Jones Sauveur 1 885 
The Family and the Law — Sarah T. Knox 1 909 

Improvising in the Evening (Poems) — Clarissa Hall Hammond 1910 
Juliette Low, Girl Scout — Helen Boyd Higgins 191 4 (American and German 

Editions) 

32 



Look on the Fields — Helen Danforth Prudden 191 3 

Cover Design — Peggy Prudden 1939 

Illustrations — Carol Prudden Dinkel 1935 
Magazine Articles — Catherine C. Leach 191 5 
Poems — Elizabeth F. Leach 1 9 1 5 

Once Upon a Time in Egypt — (Story and pictures) Frances K. Gere 191 7 
My Country-In-Law — Mary Shipman Mian 1 9 1 7 
Many Moods (Poems) — Marjorie Wolfe Staples 1924 
They Sent Me to Iceland — Jane Goodell 1931 
Half Pint — Jeanne Cowles Wilson 1 940 



Irene Atwwod '18 — Editor of the monthly publication of Higham, 
Neilson, Whittredge & Reid Insurance Agency 

Mary Angus '31 — Manager of Andover Coop for 10 years. Only woman 
manager of a Consumers' Cooperative in the country 

Elizabeth Bradley '50 — Phi Beta Kappa — Smith College 

Constance Corey '51 — Dean's List — Wheaton College 

Mary Curtis '39 — Soloist with the New York City Opera Company 

Sue Davis Snyder '48 — Assistant Editor of Vogue 

Cynthia Faigle '50 — Dean's List — Syracuse University 

Deborah Redfield '50 — President of Senior Class — Wheelock College 

Barbara Gibson '51 — President of Wellesley College Choir 

Frances Russell '51 — Dean's List — Bouve-Boston School 

Doris Schoonmaker '53 — Secretary of the Smith Athletic Association 



Pauline Humeston (Mrs. Herbert P. Carter), 1927, was elected 
Alumnae Trustee. She will serve from 1954- 1960. 



33 



Annual Meeting of the Alumnae 
Association 

SECRETARY'S REPORT 

The Abbot Academy Alumnae Association held its annual meeting on 
Saturday, May 8, at 10:45 a - m - 2 75 alumnae attended the meeting which 
was held in Davis Hall, because the Chapel could not accommodate such a 
large group. Miss Irene Atwood called the meeting to order, and welcomed 
the alumnae to the 125th Birthday Celebration. 

The sixty-five members of the Senior class marched in, singing their 
class song. Miss Hearsey presented the class. Miss Atwood welcomed them 
as new members of the association, and introduced the alumnae relatives in 
the class. The list follows: 

Martha Belknap — daughter of Elizabeth Allen Belknap, 191 5; niece of 
Ruth Allen Healy, 191 8; cousin of Nancy Allen, 1952, Wendy Allen, 1953, 
Ruth Whitehill Wygant, 1929, and Marie Whitehall, 1931. 

Diane Cookman — sister of Nadine Cookman Price, 1 948. 

Louise Marie de Cholnoky — cousin of Cora- Alice St. John, 1951, and 
Cornelia St. John, 1954. 

Margaretta McCormick Furst — granddaughter of Aida Dunn Furst, 
1894; sister of Carolin Furst, 1951 ; cousin of Lois Dunn, 1928, and Gail 
Husted, 1954; relative of Dorothy McCormick Mosser, 1909. 

Beverly Gramkow — daughter of Margaret Nay Gramkow, 1927, and 
sister of Ann Gramkow, 1957. 

Gail Husted — niece of Dorothy McCormick Mosser, 1 909, and cousin of 
Carolin Furst, 1951 , and Margaretta Furst, 1954. 

Suzanne Larter — niece of Ruth Larter Eveleth, 1924, and cousin of 
Patricia Eveleth, 1953. 

Harriet Moore — cousin of Margaret Moore, 1954, and Mary Elizabeth 
Moore Gustafson, 1932. 

Margaret Moore — cousin of Harriet Moore, 1954, and Mary Elizabeth 
Moore Gustafson, 1932. 

Frances D. Nolde — cousin of Sarah M. Sullivan, 1955. 

Cornelia R. St. John — sister of Cora- Alice St. John, 1 951 , and cousin 
of Louise Marie de Cholnoky, 1954. 

Patricia Sanborn — daughter of Frances Flagg Sanborn, 1926; sister of 
Ann Sanborn, 1952; niece of Dorothea Flagg Smith, 1922, and of Elizabeth 
Flagg Dow, 1923. 

34 



Patricia Skillin — sister of Jeanne Skillin, 1955. 

Mary Weir — cousin of Florence Fryling Willis, 1946. 

Joan Wheeler — niece of Phyllis Brooks Stevens, 191 5, and Gwendolen 
Brooks Reynolds, 191 8. 

Mary Woolverton — granddaughter of Isabel Nicholson Eaton, 1893; 
niece of Margaret Wolf Woolverton, 1923; cousin of Jane Woolverton, 1949. 

The seniors sang salutes to Miss Hearsey, Miss Atwood, the 50- and 25- 
year classes, and led the singing of "Fair Alma Mater." 

The following reports were read and accepted : Clerk, Jane Holt Atkin- 
son, 1 91 9; Treasurer, Helen Knight Wilkinson, 1922; General Secretary, 
Jane Sullivan, 1931; Retiring Alumnae Trustee, Jane Baldwin, 1922, who 
announced the election of Pauline Humeston Carter, 1927, as the new Alum- 
nae Trustee. Jane Sullivan read the list of alumnae whose deaths had been 
reported during the year. 

Helen Allen Henry, 1932, chairman of the Gymnasium Fund, announced 
the plans for the drive. Mary Howard Nutting, 1 940, announced the plans for 
the solicitation of alumnae. 

Pauline Spear Chapin, 1936, chairman of the nominating committee, 
presented the following slate of officers: President, Irene Atwood, 191 8; first 
vice-president, Mary Howard Nutting, 1940; second vice-president, Dorothy 
Taylor, 1908; third vice-president, Betty Weaver Van Wart, 1933; clerk, Bar- 
bara Healey Holland, 1930; treasurer, Mary Dooley Bragg, 1936. This slate 
was approved and the officers were declared elected. 

Miss Atwood introduced Miss Annah J. Kimball of the class of 1884, the 
oldest alumna present at the meeting. 

It was also announced that Miss Jane Carpenter, 1892, is writing a 
history of Miss Bailey's regime. 

Alumnae from California and Spain were welcomed. 

Class reunion gifts were announced (see page 30 for list). 

The president expressed her appreciation to Andree Luce, 1945, who 
arranged the exhibit of alumnae creative works; to Marjorie Knowlton Hollis, 
1927, and Helen Cutler Appleton, 1932, for flower arrangements in the 
Alumnae Headquarters; to Marion Peck, assistant in the Alumnae Office, 
Emily Bullock, 1931, Frances Flagg Sanborn, 1926, Louise Risley Stever, 
1937, and Mary Carpenter Dake, former physical education instructor. 

The meeting closed with a parade of alumnae in costumes representing 
their years at Abbot. 

C. Jane Sullivan 

General Secretary 



35 



TREASURER'S REPORT 1953-1954 
June 1953 Balance in Andover National Bank $838.53 

Receipts 

: 953 

June 10 Alumnae Luncheon Receipts 257.25 

August 7 Interest from invested funds 394.11 

Expenditures 

1953 

August 21 Alumnae Luncheon Flowers 

Osborne Sutton — Alumnae Tea 

Garden City Print, Inc. — Commencement 
Invitations 
September 16 Alumnae Association Board Meeting 
November 20 Alumnae Fund Follow-Up Notices 

Smith Alumnae Quarterly 

Jane Sullivan — Connecticut Abbot Club Trip 

American Alumni Council Dues 

Miss Hearsey's Discretionary Fund 

J954 

March 1 1 Boston Abbot Club Invitations 

Jane Sullivan — New York Abbot Club Trip 

May 8 Balance in Andover National Bank 

Helen Knight Wilkinson, Treasurer 

I have examined the accounts and found the balance to be correct. 

Sally Bodwell Houghton, Auditor 



24 


00 


4 


80 


3 1 


9° 


l 3 


00 


87 


09 


2 


00 


10 


00 


55 


00 


100 


00 


36 


55 


22 


25 


386 


59 


$1 103 


30 



Changes of address usually included in the Bulletin were 
omitted in this issue, but will appear in the October Bulletin. 



36 



3n fflfcmnrtam 



1878 

Ethel Joanna Bolton (Mrs. William F. 
Todd) died Jan. 16, 1954, at the age of 94, in 
St. Stephen, N. B. She was the widow of the 
former lieutenant-governor of New Bruns- 
wick, and a descendant of the founder of St. 
Stephen. Our sincere sympathy is extended 
to her daughter, Winifred Todd Mills, Abbot 
1900. 

1887 

Clara Lee Wooster (Mrs. G. Herbert 
Merrill) died October 8, 1953, in Middle- 
town, N. J. She is survived by two sons and 
one sister. 

1888 

Nina Walton (Mrs. Mark D. Batchelder) 
died April 12, 1954, in Peru, Vermont. 

1891 

Annie May Bull (Mrs. Daniel H. Harden- 
bergh) died October 7, 1953, at her home in 
Middletown, N. Y. 

Eleanor Billings Royce (Mrs. Elgin L. 
McBurney) died February 2, 1954, in 
Jersey City, N. J. She is survived by two 
daughters, Mrs. William J. Vogel and Mrs. 
Francis Storm. 

1900 

Winona Algie died February 14, 1954, in 
Dedham, Mass. Miss Algie served as vice- 
president of the Alumnae Association and 
was alumnae trustee from 1936- 1939. Our 
sincere sympathy is extended to her sister. 



1903 

Marion Gates Roby (Mrs. Ransom H. 
Holcomb) died December 20, 1953, in Isle 
La Motte, Vt. She died of cancer on the 
same day her sister died of the same disease. 
Our sympathy is extended to her husband. 

1904 

Beatrice M. Gunter (Mrs. John P. Dabney, 
2nd) died December 5, 1953, in Reading, 
Mass. Mrs. Dabney had been Class Fund 
Secretary for two years. Our sincere sym- 
pathy is extended to her daughter and son. 

1907 

Christine Wyer (Mrs. Allison Jones) died 
March 9, 1954, after a long illness. Our sin- 
cere sympathy is extended to her daughter, 
Constance Rundlett Huston, Abbot, 1928. 

1908 

Marion M. Lewis (Mrs. Kellogg Boynton) 
died February 12, 1954, in Fort Worth, 
Texas, after a long illness. Our sympathy is 
extended to her sister, Beatrice Lewis 
Thompson '12, and to her three sons. 

1934 

Ann Byron (Mrs. Arthur L. Richtmyre) 
died March 24, 1954, after a brief illness. 

1943 

Cynthia Lovely died suddenly of a coro- 
nary occlusion, April 8, 1954, in Kingston, 
N. Y., where she was doing library work in 
the schools. She is survived by her parents 
and her brother, John. 



Class News 



1886 

Mary Gorton Darling broke her hip one 
week before the Birthday Celebration, and 
was unable to attend. We all missed her, but 
enjoyed the red carnations which she sent 
for the Alumnae Meeting. 

1894 

Aida Dunn Furst heard from fifteen mem- 
bers of her class at the time of the Birthday 
Celebration. 

Henrietta Calhoun Bogart writes that she is 
taking a trip to "the Old Country" this year. 

Ruth Haven is now living in Chatfield, 



Minn. She retired in 1947 from her position 
as branch librarian in Duluth. 

Katherine Lahm Parker went to Europe 
this spring for a long tour. 

Mabel Stone Griffin writes that since her 
husband's death two years ago she has been 
living in Waynesboro, Va. She was unable 
to attend the Birthday Celebration because 
of a long siege of illness. 

1900 

As the Bulletin will reach you all, this 
seems the suitable way to report the Reunion 
to you. 



37 



At the reunion luncheon on Saturday, 
May 8th, at the Andover Inn the classes of 
'99, '00, '01 and '03 with one guest made a 
table often. 1899 was represented by Maboth 
L. Wolfenden Hill, 1900 by Grace Chapman 
Spear, Lottie Redford, and Irma Sadler 
Webb, 1 90 1 by Delight Hall Gage, Frieda 
Billings Cushman, Helen Hale, and Isabel 
Herrick Klous, and 1903 by Jean David 
Blunt. The luncheon was excellent. News 
from class members was exchanged and 
many incidents of school life recalled. 

The unusual festivities and gatherings of 
this 125th Anniversary Celebration made it 
a memorable occasion and I can't begin to 
tell all you girls of 1900 who couldn't be 
there what you have missed. The Service 
Sunday morning for the Alumnae was to 
me the high spot of the week end. The 
beautiful music under Miss Friskin's direc- 
tion and the inspiring talk by Dr. Raymond 
Calkins in the old familiar surroundings of 
Abbot Hall filled us with pride in being 
Abbot alumnae and strengthened us for 
the life before us. 

Grace Chapman Spear 

Reunion Chairman 

1901 

Ethel Brooks Scott's son has been elected 
mayor of New Britain, Conn. 

1904 

Helen Abbott Allen has three children and 
seven grandchildren. Her daughter, Helen 
Allen Henry, Abbot '32, is chairman of the 
drive for the new Gymnasium. 

Marion Cooper spent the winter at 
Boone Tavern, Ky. 

Mary Davis Lee returned in March from 
seventeen months in England and France 
where she visited children and grandchildren. 
She toured Europe last summer with two of 
her grandchildren. 

Laura Eddy McCabe writes that she has 
four children and ten grandchildren. 

Sophie Gibbs Sage has two sons. One is 
married and lives in West Hartford. We 
were sorry to learn that her other son was 
injured in World War II. 

Verta Smith Etz is president of the Massa- 
chusetts Association of Universalist Women. 
She has two grandchildren. 

Grace Speirs Sodergren went to Europe in 
the spring. 

Emily Stearns Giese writes that she has 
eight grandchildren. 






Julia Wallace Gage writes that her only 
son, Wallace, has three children. 

Julia Warren Pomeroy has six children and 
ten grandchildren. One of her sons is a cap- 
tain in the Air Force, and is serving in 
Germany as a jet pilot. 

1907 

Alice Webster Brush announces the birth 
of her second granddaughter on Feb. 4, 1954. 

1908 

Mary Howell retired last October as the 
Executive Secretary of the Richmond 
Children's Aid Society. She had served in 
this capacity for 26 years. She has been in 
England since her retirement. 

1910 

We of 1 910 who spent such a happy week 
end at the celebration of Abbot's 125th 
Birthday wish the rest of our class could have 
been with us. Everyone was so cordial and 
friendly, and the School entertained us so 
royally, that we shall always have a very 
happy memory of the occasion. 

Eight of our class were able to attend: 
Lydia Skolfield Parsons, Emily Silsby Morgan, 
Louise Tuttle Abbott, Ruth Newcomb, 
Clarissa Hall Hammond, Ruth Murray 
Moore, Ethel Kelsey Perry, and Grace F. 
Kellogg. 

Now we are looking forward to 1955, when 
we shall have our 45th reunion and hope all 
who were unable, to attend this year, will be 
with us then. 

Grace F. Kellogg 

Reunion Chairman 

Gertrude Swanberg Cryan is taking a 
cruise through the Mediterranean this 
spring, followed by a tour of the continent. 
She writes that her three daughters are mar- 
ried, and she has five grandchildren. 

1911 

The week end of May 7th our class enjoyed 
our visit for Abbot's 125th Birthday Celebra- 
tion. We were seven for Alumnae Day: 
Edith Johnson Donald, Jessie Wightman 
Jones, Ethel Swain Smith, Ruth Mies 
Thompson, Rebecca jV^orc Weedon, Marion 
Bemis Schlesinger, and your writer, Dora 
Heys Pym. 

Some of us had breakfast Saturday morn- 
ing in the old dining room and then at 10:30 
a.m. we went to the alumnae meeting. 
Models dressed from Madame Abbot to the 



38 



year 1940 added a bit of fun. Our 191 1 elass 
luncheon was held at one o'clock at the Inn. 
All couldn't go to Levaggi's as expected so 
the Inn had classes to 1914. Because of in- 
clement weather the Bazaar had to be held 
indoors at Davis Hall instead of on the lawn. 
Edith Johnson Donald graciously resusci- 
tated us with tea at her home at 4 o'clock. 
I Dinner was in the new dining room in 
Draper Hall. Miss Margaret Van Voorhis 
1918 was a delightful toastmistress, and 
Miss Hearsey spoke in her charming manner. 
All enjoyed chatting and seeing friends 
from other classes. The weather was rainy 
and not like the lovely month of May, that 
one thinks of in Andover, but we lived in the 
past, and the present, and thought of the 
future Gymnasium Abbot is hoping for. In 
all, a Happy Reunion Celebration. 

Dora E. Heys Pym 

Dorothy Bigelow Arms expects to be on the 
high seas, steaming toward Europe in May. 

Anna Boynton Hemenway is president of 
the New London Garden Club in New 
Hampshire and is also Regional Director, for 
the state, of the Colby Junior Mothers' 
Council. 

Margaret Strong Hill's husband is Secre- 
tary of the University of Colorado and 
Budget Officer. Her daughter, Nancy, is 
married and lives in Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 
She has just had her second little boy. Peggy 
and her husband expect to visit her this 
summer, then to Mass. for their vacation. 

Henrietta Wiest Zaner spent the winter 
and spring months in Phoenix, Arizona. 

Corinne Willard Dresser spent the winter 
months in Florida. 

1913 

We all recognized each other at our re- 
union luncheon! 

This job of reunion chairman is a head- 
ache at times, but it certainly has its re- 
wards and compensations, because I am 
sure that I would not have had any personal 
news from Dorothy Perkins Estabrook. 
Helen Bowman Janney, Marion Gould Smith, 
Katharine McLaughlin Barry, and a few 
others, if we hadn't had a reunion. 

The class extends its deepest sympathy to 
Helen Hersey Heffernan in the loss of her 
husband, early in May. You girls who could 
not attend the luncheon were greatly missed 
I assure you. In my estimation our luncheon 
was successful as everyone seemed to be 



having a good time. We also thank Mildred 
Bryant Kussmaul for her whole-hearted 
interest in 191 3. She was responsible for our 
flower arrangements and they were lovely. 
She also made our purple and white sun 
bonnets that we all wore during luncheon. 
Also there was a very beautiful flower ar- 
rangement on a small table in the corner of 
the room where we dined. It was in memory 
of our deceased members. It did not cast a 
spell of sadness because we all realized that 
if they had been with us they would have 
had fun too, and wanted us to have it on 
that day also. Last, but by no means least, 
the members of Abbot alumnae will be in- 
terested to learn that Helen Danforth Prud- 
den has just had a beautiful collection of 
poems printed. "Look to the Fields" is its 
title. Helen Boyd Higgins' latest book 
"Juliette Low," has been published in 
English and German editions. Of interest too 
is that Alice Harsh has gone far and wide in 
her thirst for knowledge. 

1 9 1 3 is very proud of her members and the 
girls associated with 191 3. Hope to see all of 
you in 1959. Remember this: "Creaking 
doors are long on their hinges". Let's oil the 
creaks, and be back in Andover for another 
gala time again. My, but it was so good to 
see you all looking so fine. 

Olga Erickson Tucker 

Reunion Chairman 

Marion Martin Teeson announces the 
birth of a granddaughter to her daughter, 
Carolyn, Feb. 28, 1954. 

1914 

Louise Allaman Austin from Dayton, Ohio, 
and Marie Winsor Appleby, from W. Allen- 
hurst, New Jersey, came to our reunion from 
the greatest distance. 

Elizabeth Bartlett Jenks lives now in Rock- 
port and is enthusiastic about the town and 
renewing old acquaintances there. She and 
her sister, Mary (aff. 191 8), motored to 
Florida this winter. 

Harriet Bowman Meeker is just waiting to 
repeat her first European trip which she 
took last fall and writes appreciatively of 
receiving class news. 

Ursula Kimball Jordan wrote of her con- 
tinued interest in Abbot; but in May, owing 
to her husband's teaching in the University 
of Vermont Medical College, she is too busy 
to get away. 

Eloise Seramur of San Diego, California, 



39 



has sent Elsie Gleason Sloan a small volume 
of verse, "Let the Heart Sing," written by 
her mother, Elsie Whipple Revill. It is a 
charming memorial tribute from a devoted 
and understanding daughter. The book was 
available at the time of our reunion for 
classmates who wished to peruse it. 

Ella Stohn Getchell wrote in February 
that she was awaiting daily the arrival of her 
9th grandchild, which will "divide up, 
three apiece to two daughters and a son." 
Daughter Vivian has three girls, and her 
other daughter, Hazel, has three boys; 
Douglas, Jr., had two boys at the time Ella 
wrote and the 9th was to be his. We too will 
be anxious to know if the score improves in 
favor of Abbot for the future! Ella's youngest 
son, Donald, has completed his two years 
military service and has entered the photo- 
graphic equipment business. 

1915 

The class of 191 5 held its 40th reunion one 
year in advance, so that we could join in the 
celebration of Abbot's 125th Birthday. The 
response to the advance notices was most 
gratifying and though many girls were un- 
able to come for various reasons, there were 
12 of us at the class luncheon Saturday. 
We are giving our 40th class gift of Si 95.00 
to the new gymnasium fund, and any who 
have not contributed to the class gift, may 
still do so. Her birthday party was a huge 
success and we were again aware of the 
great heritage that has been handed down 
to us from Abbot Academy. 

Marian Brooks 

Reunion Chairman 

1916 

Of our 40 "Graduates" and 10 "Affili- 
ates", I was completely ignored by 3 of the 
former and 4 of the latter; but, even though 
only 15 of our class and one affiliate got back 
for reunion, 30 classmates and 2 affiliates 
shared in our Birthday gift of $321.00 
which added to the $109.00 already sub- 
scribed to the Scholarship Fund made a 
grand total of $430.00. This falls short of 
our desired 100% representation, but is, I 
think, substantially satisfactory. 

As a school, so large were our numbers, 
only the class of 1914 down to the present 
could be at Levaggi's, but it was fun to have 
those we knew in classes other than our own, 
at hand to enjoy the fun with us. Too, we 
had the good fortune of having Miss Hearsey 



join our table so had a chance to hear some- 
thing of the school of the moment. 

Because I expect there will be much writ- 
ten elsewhere in this Bulletin of the Anni- 
versary Celebration and, if they dare print 
our picture, those attending will be listed, I 
will not write of these things. We did how- 
ever, decide to hold our 40th when due in 
1956 but failed to elect a reunion chairman. 
In this connection let me say that while this 
post requires much letter writing and 
frustrating as it is to have stamped and self- 
addressed postcards ignored, the net result is 
one of much pleasure. I have loved your 
letters and hope eventually to answer them. 
So many thanks to all of you who con- 
tributed to the success of this reunion and a 
special vote of thanks to Dorothy Higgins 
Rand who was sport enough to parade wear- 
ing a costume purported to be of our era 
and which did nothing to enhance her 
beauty. She too by the way was the only 
one of our class to exhibit a picture, and a 
very good one it was too. 

"Love'n'kisses" 

Ted 

The class will be sorry to learn that Mar- 
garet Perry James's father died in January 
after an illness of five years. Margaret 
writes that her son, Perry, is a sophomore at 
Georgia Tech. Margaret's daughter, Bar- 
bara, had a daughter in September, and her 
daughter Grace, had a son in October. 

1917 

Greetings to all 191 7 girls — Abbot's 
125th Birthday was a real success in spite of 
the weather. There were six of us there and 
we enjoyed every minute of it. The school j 
was most generous and entertained us 
royally. One of the nicest parts was that all 
classes were back and we knew the 1916 and 
1918 girls and many others. 

Carita Bigelow Moore had just returned 
from a convention in Denver for the League 
of Women Voters. While there she talked on 
the phone with Janet Davis Wierman who 
has three daughters. We have not heard 
from Janet for a long time and it was fun to 
hear her news as well as the others. Bernice 
Boutwell Parsons was with us. She is a busy 
girl with the Lexington Arts and Crafts 
Society. She does beautiful weaving. Har- 
riet Balfe Nalle sent a newsy letter. Esther | 
Davis Smith sent news of eight grandchildren: 
Susan, Abigail, Esther, Katherine, Putnam, 



40 



It is time to change! 



Peter, Edwin and Timothy. Mildred Gilmore 
Paegel is visiting her son (a doctor) and his 
family in California. Mildred lost her hus- 
band last year but still makes her home in 
Needham. We missed Gertrude Goss as she 
helped to liven up our last reunion. Francis 
Gere, our old faithful, was back and had 
some of her work in the exhibit. Betty Graves 
Hill wrote of her four sons: — one a professor 
of French at Skidmore college; one a doctor 
in the navy; one at Drew Theological Sem- 
inary, and one entering B. U. Divinity 
School in the fall. We greatly missed Esther 
Hungerford Staub who has been an invalid 
for some time. We had a nice letter from 
Dorothy Small Wescott who spends winters 
in Florida and summers in Nantucket. Dot 
has been on crutches for some time but finds 
it no hindrance. A letter from Harriet Mur- 
doch Andersson who leads a busy life in 
Hamden, Conn, says her daughter is at Gar- 
land School in Boston and her son at Yale. 
Cornelia Newcomb Lattin wrote of her four 
grandchildren. Cornelia Sargent Battershill 
met us at Levaggi's for lunch and Edith 
Marsden, who is head of the French Dept. 
at Lawrence High School joined us at the 
alumnae meeting. Mary Wuichet De Armon 
almost came and we hope she will really 
make it 1957. A letter from Hilda Temple 
LaMarque tells about her two sons and her 
new home on Mansuring Island, Rye, N. Y. 
Dorothy Newton leads a busy life as head of 
the French Dept. at West Hartford High 
School. She met Harriet Murdoch Andersson 
recently. A letter from Dorothy Baxter Lare 
tells of two grandchildren. You will read 
about the different events of the celebration 
in the Bulletin. 

To those of you who sent checks, many 
thanks. To those of you who sent letters, 
thank you, and thanks to those who an- 
swered the postcards. To the remainder: 
please keep in touch with 191 7 and Abbot. 
You'll be glad if you do. The Abbot spirit 
grows and grows. 

Miriam Bacon Chellis 
Reunion Chairman 

The class extends its sympathy to Cornelia 
Sargent Battershill whose father died in Feb- 
ruary. 



1918 

To the Class of 1918, Greetings: 

This is, for the most part, to those of you 
who could not come to Abbot's 125th birth- 
day celebration and our postponed reunion. 

Some of our class arrived in Andover on 
Friday night, but the largest group of us to 
get together was at Levaggi's for luncheon, 
Saturday. See picture. 

The Annual Meeting of the Alumnae 
Association was in the morning and Irene, as 
president, presided with her usual ease and 
charm. At the end of the program one girl 
from each class (or very nearly each class) 
was in a parade in costume suitable to her 
time at Abbot. Clare Horton Sanford repre- 
sented 1 91 8 in white middy blouse, skirt, 
shoes and stockings, black tie and gob hat, 
carrying one of the old wooden rifles which 
we used so long ago in Military Drill. Clare 
got a wonderful hand when she "presented 
arms". You can well imagine that some of 
the costumes were really lovely, and some — 
those of the '20s, really grotesque. 

The banquet Saturday evening was some- 
thing else which I am sorry you missed. 
Those of us who sat looking at the head 
table were very proud of Irene Atwood and 
Margaret Van Voorhis, who was toast- 
mistress and did a beautiful job of introduc- 
ing the trustees and speakers. 

I am going to save the rest of the space 
for Irene to tell you more about it all. Best 
wishes to you all and we missed you. 

Louise 

I can only add that we all sincerely 
wished that each member of the Class of 1918 
might have been with us for Alumnae Day 
this year particularly. I know I speak for all 
of us when I say that Louise should have a 
vote of thanks for her efforts on our behalf. 
She did yeoman's work in contacting, both 
personally and by letter, as many classmates 
as possible, and arranging hospitality which 
added a lot to our enjoyment. We can and do 
count on her, and hope that she will be will- 
ing to carry on when our next reunion comes 
around. 

Irene 

1919 

Yes, it was our 35th Reunion and great 
fun, with a quarter of the class there. See 
picture. 

We missed all of you who couldn't come, 
and your notes were much appreciated. 



41 



Millie Frost Eaton gave a cocktail party 
for the class on Saturday before the banquet. 
Many many thanks to her! 

Our newly appointed Class Fund Secre- 
tary is Kathryn Beck Dow. 

Chairman of the 40th Reunion is Jane 
Holt Atkinson. 

Katharine Coe Taylor 
Reunion Chairman 

Kathryn Beck Dow's daughter has just 
returned from 2^ years in Germany, and 
she is now in Washington. Her other daugh- 
ter is married and has a son. 

Marea Blackford Fowler's son, Gordon, is a 
freshman at Princeton. 

Gretchen Brown Knight's daughter, De- 
borah, who was graduated from Stephens 
College in Columbia, Mo., is now teaching 
flying there. 

Mary Button Allen's daughter, Judy, will 
graduate in June from the Children's Hos- 
pital School of Nursing. 

Mary Cole Day's older son is a lawyer in 
Biddeford, Me. Her younger son is in the 
hardware business. Mary has had two Eng- 
lish evacuees with her since 1940. One of 
them is a junior at Mount Holyoke, and the 
other is a sophomore at Harvard, and plans 
to study for the ministry. 

Charlotte Copeland Gray is living at home 
with her mother who is 92 years old. Char- 
lotte has one grandson who is 1 3^2 years old. 

Dorothy Evans has a greenhouse and a 
large collection of rare and exotic plants. 
Her adopted daughter is with her. Dorothy 
is still the soloist at the Christian Science 
Church in St. Petersburg. 

Elizabeth Grover Evans writes that her son 
has been in Korea since last June with the 
Army Engineers. Her daughter is married 
and has two sons. 

Harriette Harrison spent four months in 
St. Petersburg last winter. She is a member 
of the Art Club in St. Petersburg, and takes 
lessons in oils. 

Winifred LeBoutillier Tyer writes that her 
daughter, Martha, was married in April, 
1952, to Nelson Curtis, Jr. Her daughter, 
Beatrice Tyer Campbell, had a daughter, 
in July, 1952. 

Gertrude Lombard McGinley writes that 
her husband has retired and now raises 
English setters and trains them in Georgia 
during the winter. Her son, Frank is a 
sophomore at Bowdoin. She had a daughter, 
Susan, who is 1 1 . 



Elisabeth Luce Moore writes that one of 
her sons is starting a business in California, 
and another is at Fort Dix. She writes: 
"Life is fascinating, but hectic with too many 
jobs! Wellesley trustee, YWCA international 
work, China Institute, U.S.O. and flying 
trips to remote corners of the world." 

Mary Martin is teaching and is very busy 
with Teacher Association work. She is 
president of the Long Island Zone of the 
New York State Teachers' Association. 

Marian Nichols Fiore writes that she is 
president of the Newport News Women's 
Club. In May she will attend the General 
Federation of Women's Clubs Convention 
in Denver. She has three of "the most re- 
markable, beautiful and intelligent grand- 
children!" 

Betty Wright Parr writes that her son has 
just been discharged from the Army after 
two years in Okinawa. He plans to continue 
his college Forestry course at UCLA in the 
fall. Betty has been working for the past two 
years at the Annandale Country Club in 
Pasadena. 

Helen Wygant Smith reports that she has 
a 2^-year-old grandson. 

1920 

Helen Polk Barker writes that she and her 
family are now living in a "truly ancient 
house" in Newport, R. I. The house was 
built in 1708. 

1921 

Marion Cleveland Botsford's son, William, 
is a junior in Wellesley High School, and 
co-captain of next year's Cross Country 
team. 

The class will be sorry to learn that 
Virginia Hemingway Spayde's father died 
last September. Virginia is a kindergarten 
director in the Muncie (Ind.) Public 
Schools. She and her husband plan to move 
to Lansing, Mich, in June, and would love 
to see any Abbot alumnae who are in that 
area. 

Mary Williams Cochran writes that she is 
living with her mother who is now 86. 
Mary's son, Bill, is working at the Massa- 
chusetts General Hospital with Dr. Aufranc 
and Dr. Smith-Peterson. Her son, John, 
graduated from Princeton in '53, and is now 
at Harvard Law School. Her twin sons, Jim 
and Bob, are juniors at Princeton and her 
daughter, Ann, is a senior at Newton High 
School. 



42 



1922 

You will hear all about the new Gym and 
the events of the Birthday celebration else- 
where in the Bulletin but I want to tell you 
of the fifteen girls of 1922 who were able to 
leave their jobs and families on this rainy 
week end. Before I report on the answers to 
my postal cards, I'll begin with them — still 
essentially the same, a few added pounds for 
some, becoming grey hair appearing on 
most of us as we round out thirty-two years 
since the day we graduated. That very 
slender girl always rushing headlong then, is 
now a poised, handsome woman. Jane Bald- 
win received well-deserved praise for her 
record on the Board of Trustees at the ban- 
quet. She and Helen Knight Wilkinson 
were on the platform at the Alumnae Meet- 
ing. Helen is treasurer. She had to miss our 
luncheon to take her eldest daughter to a 
camp reunion in Boston. The youngest is 
now nine and Helen's son is engaged to a 
Baltimore girl. 

Gwen Bloomfield Tillson was always ready 
to serve the school when asked to do so. She 
had a picture of her son Bob's son 4^ and 
daughter 2^. Dick is working in Washing- 
ton, D. C. and receives his master's degree in 
International Relations from John Hopkins 
in June. Debbie, fifteen, will enter Abbot 
this fall. 

Sally Bodwell Houghton has welcomed us 
to delicious meals at "Fieldstones" many 
times, but it was fine to have her able to sit 
with us this year. She is a director of the 
Massachusetts Restaurant Association and 
shares a hobby with her husband — fishing 
in Maine and Florida and photography. 

Ruth Dewey York has not been back for 
ages. She makes a home for her mother 
and twelve-year-old son and teaches first 
grade in Nahant. 

Barbie Goss is always a joy to meet, is still 
teaching at Winsor School in Boston, where 
she has an apartment. Bet she is a popular 
teacher! Week ends and summers Barbie 
gives a lot of her time to her parents. Having 
taught at Dobbs Ferry as well she finds 
spring apt to bring her several reunions. 
Nice this one came so early, but we see her 
at most of ours anyway. 

Bubbles Hutchinson Bluntschli has not 
been back since the 25th, and in the mean- 
time her eldest daughter was married to 
Schuyler Brooks and is living in Durango, 
Col. Margot graduated from St. Luke's 



Hospital in New York and has been at 
Doctors Hospital in Miami, Fla. Young Hoi) 
is at the Salisbury School in Salisbury, 
Conn. Bubbles and her husband spent one 
night with Anne Whinery in Va. not too 
long ago, and she met Carol Iredell and 
Peg Day Suydam on the west coast of Florida 
last winter. 

It was good to see Mary Mallory Pattison 
again. She and her husband have forsaken 
N. Y. and are enjoying Sherman, Conn, very 
much. 

Florence Phillips Cooke is another faithful 
one! A lot of local activities find her ready to 
help when needed, but she finds time to ski 
and travel with her family of three sons and 
daughter, Nancy, who is president of the 
freshman class at Walnut Hill School in 
Natick, Mass. The eldest son was married in 
'52 and is now living in Boulder, Col. The 
other boys are at Dartmouth, one graduat- 
ing this June and the other after losing 
several months because of illness, is a fresh- 
man. 

Looking almost exactly the same, Peg 
Potter Kensinger was our representative in 
the parade at the Alumnae meeting, cos- 
tumed as we were in 1922! Peg and her 
husband are very active in Melrose activities 
where they have a lovely home and also en- 
joy a summer home on an island in Winne- 
pesaukee. 

A reunion wouldn't seem the same without 
Al Van Schmus Smith and Carol Iredell — I 
believe they have been at all of them. Al's 
two daughters are nearly grown up — as 
are most of the ninety or so children the 
class produced. 

It is a new home for Jimmy Burr Sanders 
and Les, in Marblehead this time. Their 
younger daughter is working in California 
while the elder is married and living in 
Natick, Mass. with her husband and small 
son. 

Alice Tower Kirkby was one we expected 
to see, coming from Montclair, N. J. this 
year. She and Norman closed their home in 
Orange, Mass. and went to care for an 
elderly uncle in Montclair. 

Bill and I have been living in Holliston 
for two years and like it very much tho' we 
are away a lot of the time, for his decorating 
business takes us all thru New England. A 
year ago we were visiting in S. Casco, Me. 
and were delighted to find Anne Darling 
Whitehouse living nearby. Our children 



43 



are all married. Gale is with the telephone 
company in Framingham, and his wife and 
he have a son and daughter, Brad — 7^ and 
Rosalyn, 3. Carolyn and Wayne have two 
boys, Vance, 5 and Brian, 2^ — they spent 
four months in Florida this winter but are 
back in N. Berwick, Me. now. Peter is with 
General Motors in Framingham and he 
and Barbie expect their first baby in July. 
Christine and Peter Brownson are in Wake- 
field and she has been nursing at the Melrose 
Hospital but starts at the Lahey Clinic 
May 17th. 

That is the news of the girls who were 
able to come back, despite Mother's Day, 
families and the constant rain — about ten 
of us have made every reunion I think. We 
wore the class flower — red roses — with 
gold "22V on white satin ribbons. Dorothea 
Flagg Smith sent a lovely stencilled tray for 
the creative works exhibit and I entered 
landscapes in oil. 

NOW! I heard from only thirty-one of you 
— and not a single picture came ! I guess we 
were a healthy class because we are all living 
and very busy with our jobs, families, etc. 
I think we have more than eighteen grand- 
children. 

Betty Brewster Thompson was one of the 
first to answer my card. She is chairman of 
the local Heart Fund and with her daughter, 
Marvelle, does a variety of Red Cross work. 
Her hobbies are collecting old pitchers and 
doing handwork. 

Isabel Brown Lee became Mrs. W. S. 
Crawford recently and they are on a trip to 
Europe to visit Isabel's oldest son, wife, and 
two children in Paris. Isabel had pictures of 
her other handsome children when she came 
back last. 

Katherine Damon Kletzien is living in 
Swarthmore, Pa., not too far from Ruth Hill 
Kephart she says. Her eldest daughter is in 
the 4th year of the five-year nursing course 
at the U. of Pa. Hospital (we have about 
five class daughters in medicine or nursing!) 
Kay's daughter, Phyllis, is a junior at Mt. 
Holyoke, majoring in religion and sociology 
and is engaged to a divinity student. The 
older son is an ardent radio "ham" at 16, 
and Ralph, 11, is a naturally good athlete. 
Kay has many interests and has tailored a 
suit reported to be very successful — and 
becoming to her! 

It was wonderful to hear from Katherine 
Gage again after a long silence. Now Sister 



Mary Anslem, she has been teaching H.S. 
English for 3I4 years in St. Mary's School in 
Sewanee, Tenn. and plans to take education 
courses at N.Y.U. next summer. 

Van Lamb says she is teaching second 
grade and is also managing teacher in a 
fourteen-room new elementary school in 
Madison, Conn, but Peg Potter's niece who 
teaches there calls her the principal! Van 
has taken thousands of feet of film of beauti- 
ful scenes in her travels thru Alaska, our own 
west, Canada, the Northwest and Venezuela. 

Dottie Moxley Pitman has two daughters, 
the eldest Phyllis, is working at the Harvard 
Medical School and Diane is a sophomore 
at Laconia, N. H. High School. Dot says her 
life is still mainly homework, community 
work and fun! 

It was to be Eleanor Rose's first reunion 
but an unexpected illness kept her in Florida 
three weeks before she returned to Ellen- 
ville, N. Y. to convalesce. Hope she tries 
again. 

Marion Rugg Caywood is planning a 
wedding with all the "trimmings" for her 
only child, Abbie, when she marries a 
young medical student on June 16th. This 
girl we called "Tubby" has not weighed 
over 1 18 lbs. in 25 years — Wish I could say 
that! 

Heard indirectly that one of Barb Sands 
Sherman's sons is married. 

Marian Saunders Cheesborough and her 
husband started on a tour of Europe May 
6th. Having three sons she is rejoicing in a 
granddaughter. Maybe Sandy and Isabel 
will meet in Europe! 

Janet Warren Winslow and her husband 
are on a trip west and she expects to drop in 
on Charlotte Petrikin on their way thru 
Denver. They will visit Sun Valley, Yellow- 
stone Park and the Tetons before going to 
Maine for the summer. Anne, the eldest girl, 
is at the Kendall Mills in Walpole, Mass. and 
the youngest is a student at Dickinson Col- 
lege in Pa. 

Kay Weeks Plaisted was missed this year — 
she is a regular member as a rule at reunions, 
but they were in the midst of moving to 
Meredith, N. H. this week. Her son, Ted, is 
in the Class of '55 at Brown and Anne will 
enter the University of Vermont in the fall 
for medical technician courses. 

Susie Welborn Osborn met Abbot girls in 
Florida last winter — Margaret Wolf Wool- 
verton and Isabelle Parrot Mitchell. Her son, 



44 



David, is living in Jacksonville where he is 
rid of the asthma that bothered him in the 
north. 

Bubbles says Anne Whinery is much the 
same — full of efficient vigor as she runs her 
job with the Va. State Welfare Dept. and 
Anne claims to be a past master in tending 
die lawn and gardens about her home in 
Richmond, Va. 

Dottie Williams Davidson left after Easter 
with her husband and youngest daughter, 
Mary Faith, on a trip to California. She is 
almost always with us at reunions and we 
miss her. The eldest daughter is a freshman 
at Wheaton and her son is at Middlebury 
College. Dot sent a copy of a message they 
had sent out at Christmas and it gives a 
picture of the kind of gracious and lovely 
home that you would expect Dot to produce 
— would that it occurred more often in our 
country! She does a variety of things in her 
community, finds time for much reading, 
some writing — mostly essays and poetry. 

Millicent Bartlett Holmberg wrote us for 
the first time in ages; she has twins who are 
married and have two children each, a son 
who is a freshman in high school and a 
little girl in the 8th grade. Millicent's time is 
divided between writing, painting and 
sculpture — with exhibits in various parts 
of the country and a one-man show of paint- 
ings in Hollywood. At present she is doing 
free lance writing and photography while 
settling a new home at 2109 Continental, 
Costa Mesa, Cal. In the past she has been 
active in Girl Scout work and I wonder if she 
has run across my roommate, Helen Goodale 
Farley, who with her husband has been in 
the same field for years. 

I have come to the last of the cards and 
letters that came in, and I have enjoyed 
hearing from you all. Every reply sent love to 
the other girls and I wish we had heard from 
every one of 1922. Any girl leaving the 
school the year we graduated is automatical- 
ly listed as one of our class, so we now have a 
total of about seventy-one names. Of that 
number fifty-four are married with close to 
ninety-five children accounted for! Seven of 
us are divorced or separated from their hus- 
bands (one married again); three widowed 
(two married again); there are five teachers 
and seven in varied careers. Write your 
news to the Bulletin regularly! 

W r e had a wonderful time and the most 
delicious meals at the school (remember 



how well Miss Butterfield ivd us?) Come back 
with us in 1957, — you will receive a warm 
welcome! 

Olive Howard Vance 

Reunion Chairman 

Juliet Haskell Carrington writes, "I am on 
a year's leave without pay from the U.S.D.A. 
owing to illness in my family. Garden Club, 
Women's Club, town librarian, and working 
for a local lawyer take up most of the time 
that I am not being a 'home maker.' I 
still find time once in a while for a game of 
bridge or bolivia. I miss my professional 
work (entomology), but I am needed here. 

"My daughter, Juliet, now married for al- 
most six years, has a graduate fellowship at 
Bryn Mawr and is a lab assistant in the 
Geology Department. My son, George, is a 
graduate assistant in the English Depart- 
ment at Ohio State." 

1923 

Anne Darling Whitehouse's two daughters 
were married recently. Nancy was married 
in December, and Priscilla in February. 

Dorothy Taylor Booth's daughter, Sally, 
was married May 1, 1954, to James Roderick 
Lilly, in the Phillips Academy Chapel in 
Andover. 

The class extends its sympathy to Esther 
Wood Peirce whose father died early in May. 

1921 

Laura Bliss Alexander writes that her two 
daughters are married. Jean is married to a 
mathematician who will teach at Dartmouth 
next year. They have been abroad for the 
past year. Her daughter, Judy, is married to 
Stephen Wiley, a student at Columbia Law 
School. 

Dorothy Converse has been made assistant 
editor of the Friendly Forum, a monthly publi- 
cation of N. H. State Hospital in Concord. 
N. H. Dorothy has been employed as an 
office worker in the main office of the Occu- 
pational Therapy Department for the past 
three years. 

Caroline Hall Wason played for several 
performances of "Iolanthe" performed by 
the Simsbury Light Opera Company in 
Middletown, Conn. 

1925 

Theodate Johnson Kloman is spending the 
winter in New York after living in London 
for four years. She writes, "I have just visited 
Betty Lincoln Burr's youngest boy who has 



45 



been adopted by his aunt and uncle. Little 
Lee is now 9, and very happy in his new 
home and at the Fenn School in Concord. 
Betty's oldest girl, Betsy, is to be married in 
June." 

1926 

"C. B." Blunt Pierson writes, "I've been 
teaching school for the last ten years. Just 
'sorta' tried to help out during the war and 
found myself completely fascinated all over 
again in the profession! The only draw-back 
was I'd only taken a two-year training 
course at Temple so I started, after school 
hours, taking extension courses and in seven 
years I finally received my B.S. It was quite 
a job — what with teaching — three chil- 
dren and a house to take charge of! Adele is 
16 and a junior in the local High School, 
Nancy is 18 and a freshman at Cedar 
Crest College, Allentown, Pa., and Bob is 
a junior at Lehigh University." 

The following letter was received from 
Edda Renouf Gould: 

"I do wish I could fly east for the reunion 
luncheon. Andover in May is especially 
lovely and the thought of it fills me with 
warm and friendly memories. The only 
alternative I can suggest is that all of you 
hop a TWA and fly out here! We could have 
a very merry picnic in our patio. The colum- 
bine is just starting to bloom and the lilac 
is in full glory. The birds are making merry 
in the great old cottonwoods .that shelter us 
(the name Las Ramadas means the shelter- 
ing branches), the orchard is scattering 
fairy confetti and beyond it and beyond the 
greening fields of alfalfa that our Spanish 
farmer neighbors cultivate, the great moun- 
tains are still capped with snow. They call 
them the Sangre de Cristos because of the 
deep rose glow on them at sunset. Mean- 
while I bark my knuckles and callous my 
hands with gardening — both flowers and a 
vegetable patch. 

"Other than family and house and garden 
my energies have been devoted mostly to 
Girl Scouts with whom I work on the Hill 
(that's Los Alamos where Gordon works and 
Andrew and Kiki go to school) — and 
League of Women Voters in Santa Fe (we 
live in Santa Fe County about 18 miles from 
town). Yesterday I was in Santa Fe demon- 
strating voting machines for our imminent 
primaries. Today I drive up on the Hill (25 
miles) to rehearse my little Girl Scouts in 



their own inimitable version of Snow White 
and the Seven Dwarfs. We've invited an- 
other troop to come see it on Thursday. 

"Our house is long and low — built of sun- 
dried mud-brick with vigas — great round 
tree trunk beams — on the ceilings, and 
brick — regular red-brick — floors. Outside 
it's just the natural light reddish-brown 
earth color and inside the walls are white 
calcimine. There's a portal, that is, an open 
porch with a roof that runs the length of the 
house facing the garden and the mountains, 
and at one end there's a walled patio with 
flagstone floor and chairs and a table for 
sitting and relaxing. A little irrigation 
brook, known as an acequia, runs between 
the lawn and the orchard. There are also 
three dogs for company. And right here and 
now I wish you would tell everyone at the 
luncheon that our latchstring is out 24 hours 
a day and that I'd love to have them stop by 
if they are ever in New Mexico. My tele- 
phone number is Santa Fe 3-4013 — and if 
the line is busy, just keep trying. We have 
ten families on the line and some are very 
talkative. Love and good luck to all of you." 

The following members of the class of 1926 
attended the Abbot Birthday party: Frances 
Flagg Sanborn, Phyllis Farwell Monaghan, 
Ruth Deadman McLennan, Gracie Griffin 
Westman, Edith Ireland Wood, Katharine 
Clay Sawyer, Virginia Spear Houghton, Jane 
Ruth Hovey, and M. Alice Perry. 



1927 

Dorothy French Gray's daughter, who 
graduates from Middlebury College in 
June, was married during her April vaca- 
tion. One of Dorothy's sons is a freshman at 
Amherst. 

Gertrude Holbrook has recently designed 
a seal for the Larchmont Woman's Club. 
She is the advertising manager of the club's 
magazine. Gertrude is designing in the dis- 
play field for B. Altman and Black Starr 
Gorham. 

Marjorie Knowlton Hollis was the winner 
of a first prize at the annual flower show of 
the Mass. Horticultural Society. Her entry, 
"The Old Weaver's Shop," was original and 
interesting, featuring a Paisley shawl as 
background, a spinning wheel and shuttle. 
For the floral accent she used orange freesia, 
blue delphinium and croton leaves in a 
wooden chalice. 



46 



192« 

The class of '28 had one of the smallest 
numbers present at the Abbot Birthday re- 
union. Geegee turned up Saturday morning 
and we expected Bea Lane Mercer who even 
sent in her fee for the luncheon and then 
didn't show up. Out of 56 cards sent out to 
the class in the spring 18 replies were re- 
turned. 

Nivvy writes: "Had such a wonderful time 
at our 25th last year that I am indeed sorry 
I cannot be present for the 26th. However, 
the Little Falls Symphony Orchestra gives a 
concert that week end and I sit behind the 
cello and furnish food for hungry musicians 
as well." 

Pipe says, "I had planned to come but 
found myself in the hospital with an opera- 
tion. Home again, but not quite up to a full 
day at Andover." 

"Am teaching in the Woodland High, 19 
miles from Sacramento. Have a 3-bedroom 
house so would love to entertain you people 
California bound," from Louise Hyde Reilly. 

Remember Katherine Fox? "I so nearly got 
there last year — dress bought, hairdo and 
all — when an accident kept me from all the 
fun — so I'll not even try this year and may- 
be I'll make it!" 

Connie Rundlett Huston came east in 
March when her mother, Mrs. Allison 
Jones, died. "Caught a glimpse of Andover 
from the train when I made a flying trip to 
Maine. Do look us up if you come near 
Santa Barbara." I take it that this is a 
blanket invitation to all the class. 

If we could get a total of all the children 
this class has produced it would make a 
pretty impressive total. I think it was men- 
tioned last year that our class had about 99 
and 44/100% married. Would any or all of 
I you send in the number, ages and sex of 
yours so we could get the total? Send it to 
me or the Alumnae Office. 

Fran Gould Parker, Emily Sloper Shailer, 
Camille Sams Lightner, Laddie Dunn, 
Eleanor Thompson Snedeker, Winifred 
Dudley Burnham, Kay Ross Brooks, Florence 
Fitzhugh Phelps, Alice Sommers French, Eliza- 
beth Small and Helen Thornburg Bailey, who 
is living in Copenhagen, Denmark, all sent 
in replies to say they could not come to the 
party. 

Better luck on your coming next time to 



our thirtieth when Bea Lane Mercer will be 
our chairman. 

Sue Ripley Ward 
Reunion Chairman 

Florence Fitzhugh Phelps writes that she is 
one of the founders of the Adoptive Service 
Fund of Westchester, and is president of the 
Mount Vernon Day Nursery. Her son, Jim, 
19, is a sophomore at Lafayette, and her son, 
Bob, 16, is in the fourth form at South Kent 
School. Her daughter, Ann, 8, is in the 
third grade. 

Elizabeth Jackson Kennedy is a case worker 
in the Child Placement Division of the Rens- 
selaer County Public Welfare in Troy, N. Y. 

1929 

T hat loyal class — ■ Fair '29 

W as back with twenty-one in line. 

E ach of us had changed a bit 

N ot in humor, pep or wit. 

T he group had lots of jolly fun 

Y ears melted 'neath Levaggi's "sun". 

N ews of you who couldn't come 
I nformed us of 'most everyone. 
N ow here's a cheer to '29 
E lated at her turnout fine! 

Many thanks to Polly Francis Loesch and 
her helpers who produced such a splendid 
reunion. One hundred dollars was con- 
tributed from the class treasury to the 
Abbot Academy Gymnasium Fund. Let 
us all do our bit in backing the drive for this 
sorely needed building. 

Millicent Smith Uppvall 

Polly Francis Loesch's puppets have been 
on television. 

Gwen Jones Hamblin sent a wire for the 
reunion which arrived too late to be given to 
the class. It said, "My thoughts are with you 
all. Best wishes and love." 

1930 

This is for you who couldn't make it — 
please come next year. Saturday was so 
nearly perfect that anything I may say about 
it will be understatement. There were seven- 
teen of us at luncheon, a larger group than 
any except the 2gers, who outnumbered us. 
See our picture in the section of class photo- 
graphs. During the afternoon we toured 
Abbot, taking in everything. There are lots 
of changes, naturally, but to me each one 
was an improvement. I shan't tell you any 



47 



more. I'd rather you joined us in '55 and you 
can see for yourselves. 

We are up-to-date on ourselves, but you 
who weren't there please send in news for the 
Bulletin, either to me or to the office. 

Kathie Fellows Ingraham 

Reunion Chairman 

1931 

Peg CLeary White, Skip Allen Carroll, 
Suzanne Welte AuBois, Betty Flory Jones, 
Sylvia Larsson Briggs, Charlotte Marland, 
Jane Sullivan, and Emily Bullock came back 
to celebrate Abbot's 125th Birthday. I re- 
ceived replies from 35 out of 67 classmates. 

Hope you're all thinking in terms of 1956 
— 1931's 25th reunion. 

Emily Bullock 
Reunion Chairman 

Mary Angus and her mother flew to Los 
Angeles for the Coop Convention this same 
week end. 

Mary Bacon and her young cousin visited 
Abbot the week end of May 1st. 

Nancy Can Holmes, who had an attack of 
polio in '49, is in a wheelchair most of the 
time. Hopes to visit in Massachusetts this 
summer. Her husband, Major J. D. Holmes, 
is stationed at Ft. Benning, Georgia. 

Connie Chamherlin Harris is in partnership 
with her husband in the chinchilla business 
in Charlottesville, Va. Hopes '31'ers travel- 
ing in that vicinity will say hello. 

Betty Flory Jones tripped east for reunion 
from Newark, Ohio, with her husband and 
eleven-year-old daughter, Flory. They spent 
Sunday with Sylvia Larsson Briggs at her 
home in Melrose Highlands. 

Harriet Gregory Norris, living in Mont 
Vernon, N. H., is busy with her family of 
five children. 

Mary Smead Homlar has a step-daughter 
she hopes to send to Abbot. 

Tommy Whitehill gave up teaching in '42 
and is an Electronics Laboratory Technician. 

1932 

Betty Bigler de Masi is working part time 
as secretary to the principal of an elementary 
school and is helping to keep schedules 
straight for my husband, daughter, and two 
sons. Her daughter is a freshman at the 
University of Maryland, and she has one son 
in Senior High School, and one in Junior 
High. 

Florence Dunbar Robertson writes, "My 



daughter, Holly, is now in the 7th grade and i 
Hugh in the 6th." 

Ruth Mailey is working at the University 
of California Radiation Laboratory. 

Eunice Randall writes that she is special 
manager for the Youth Orchestra and string 
classes sponsored by the Florida Symphony 
Orchestra. She sang in the Bach Festival 
Choir in their performances on March 4, 5, 
and 6. She also took a cruise to Jamaica and 
Cuba in January. 

Dorothy Rockwell Clark writes, "My chil- 
dren are 2^ and 1^ — need I say more?" 

1933 

Born 

To Mary Mahoney Moss, a second child, 
Katherine Peyton, Feb. 15, 1954. 

1935 

The 125th Birthday of Abbot was a suc- 
cess in spite of the weather. The six of us who 
braved the storm felt it certainly was worth 
the effort and we enjoyed every minute 
reminiscing about the "good old days." 

Cathleen Burns Elmer was chosen Reunion 
Chairman for i960. She is a radiant bride of 
a year and now living on Pinckney Street in 
Boston. Fran McTernen Coan, Eleanor 
Johnson Dutoit, Doris Anderson Clark and my- 
self have been bogged down with the routine 
duties of housewife and mother. We are 
also trying to help in community projects. 
Fran gives a day of her week to Wesson 
Hospital. Ellie is involved in Girl Scouts 
and I am Supt. of 4th, 5th and 6th grades 
at Sunday School and vice-president of the 
local Women's Club. Fran's husband has 
been made Pres. of the N Dollar Club at 
Monsanto, which means he sold more than 
any other salesman in Monsanto. He is New 
England Sales Representative and travels all 
week. We were sorry to hear Ellie's oldest 
daughter, Susan, had been suffering for a 
year with rheumatoid arthritis, but has 
almost fully recovered now. 

Martha Howe also joined us. She is living 
in Shawsheen with her mother and keeps 
busy teaching first grade. 

Received a letter from Ernestine Look 
Land. She has just produced her fifth child, 
Virginia, making a total of four girls and one 
boy! She loves California but would enjoy 
some mail from old friends. Her new address 
is 217 Fremont Ave., South Pasadena, Cali- 
fornia. 



48 



Much time was spent at the Alumnae 
Meeting explaining the great need for a new 
gymnasium at Abbot. The girls are still using 
Davis Hall which is adequate for an audi- 
torium but lacks the facilities needed for a 
gym. Fifty thousand dollars was donated to 
start the Building Fund for the $200,000 
gymnasium. At the time of the reunion our 
class had given $70.50. You can designate 
whether you wish your Alumnae Fund gift 
to be used for the new gymnasium or for 
scholarships. 

Hope to see a lot more of our classmates at 
our 20th reunion in i960. My sincere thanks 
to all who took time to answer the cards. 

Barbara Chamberlain MacCready 

Reunion Chairman 

Betsey Armington Arms has three sons, 12, 
10, and 9 years old. She has been doing 
portrait painting. Her husband has left 
teaching and is writing a history of the 
Cincinnati Bell Telephone Co. 

Helen Cary May is doing graduate work in 
social studies at Washington University, St. 
Louis. 

Ann Cutler Brecheen and her husband are 
running a Tennis Club which has three 
rented apartments. Ann does the cooking for 
her customers. 

Jane Dawes McClennan and her family of 
four children are in Dayton, Ohio, where her 
husband is doing Air Force duty. 

Helen McDonald is the secretary to the 
president of Pabco Products, and she "loves 
the Golden West." 

Lucia Nunez Mason has two children, 
Toby, 9, and Robin, 6. She is working as 
medical social consultant for the Arundel 
County Welfare Department in Annapolis. 

Shirley Smith King has three children, 
Jonathan, 51^, Avis, 83^>, and Toddy, 11 y 2 . 

Eliese Strahl Cutler writes that she has been 
living in Washington for the past three 
years after being abroad for four and one- 
half years in Guatemala, India, and assorted 
countries of Asia. Her husband was doing 
international health work for the UN. 

Helen Tower Stritmatter writes that she 
has a farm including 1000 hens, fruit trees, 
vegetables, 2 cats, 2 goats. She has two 
adopted children, Shirley, 10, and David, 7. 

1936 

Charlotte Dane von Breton has a year-old- 
son, Jonathan. Charlotte works on fund 



Are you a brick? 



raising for the Rhode Island Federation of 
Republican Women. 

Lois Holmes Stokes writes that her husband 
is principal of the Central School in Maho- 
pac, N. Y. She has three children, Mark, 14, 
Susan, 123/2, an d Sharon, 83^. The class will 
be sorry to learn that her 20-month-old 
daughter, Stephanie, was drowned last year. 

Eleanor Wells Nudd has three children, 
Margaret, 5, George, 3, and Jean, 2. During 
the summer she and her husband run a 
market garden and vegetable stand. 

Ruth Wittig is teaching physically handi- 
capped children at the Hope Haven Hos- 
pital in Jacksonville, Florida. 
Born 

To Mary Dooley Bragg a fourth child and 
third son, Edward Bigelow, Jan. 26, 1954. 

1938 

The class extends its sympathy to Phyllis 
England Letts whose father died May 3, 1954. 
Born 

To Rosa Fletcher Crocker, a third child, 
Rosa Tucker, March 10, 1954. 

To Phyllis Saunders Simpson, a fifth child 
and second son, George William, Dec. 27, 

1953- 

To Anne Simpson White a fifth daughter, 
Anne, Feb. 9, 1954. Anne writes that the 
twins are 10, Muffie is 7, and Pam is 53^. 

To Dorothy Walworth Black, a second 
daughter, Mary Frances, Feb. 2, 1954. 

1939 

Born 

To Patricia Goss Rhodes, twin sons, Dick 
and Dixie, May 1, 1954. They join Scotty, 
63/2, Barbara 5^, and Rocky, 33^. Pat 
writes, "This is our first exciting news since 
a year ago when the five of us flew to Hawaii 
for a wonderful vacation." 

To Virginia Halstead Lightfoot, a second 
child and first son, Peter Edward, Feb. 10, 
J954- 

1940 

Born 

To Elisabeth Ellis Chase, a second son, 
Philip Dana, Jan. 25, 1954. 

To Nancy Wilson Ainslie, a third child 
and second daughter, Susan Elizabeth, 



49 



Jan. 7, 1954. Nancy's husband is practicing 
obstetrics and gynecology in Metuchen, 
N. J., where they have just bought a new 
home. 

1941 

Jane Davey Corwin's husband is on the 
staff of the North Shore Country School at 
Lake Placid. They have a small Hereford 
beef cattle ranch. Their son is a year old. 

We have just learned that Martha Tyer 
was married to Nelson Curtis, Jr., April 19, 

!952. 

Born 

To Nancy Kelley Park, a fourth child and 
third son, Daniel Kim, Jan. 25, 1954. 

To Margery Martin Martin, a second son, 
Thomas Peter, Nov. 23, 1953. 

1942 

Betty Hardy Verdery and her husband 
sing in the local chorus in Cumberland, Md. 
Betty writes that she sang the part of Mabel 
in a recent production of The Pirates of Pen- 
zance presented by the chorus. She hopes to 
break into the free-lance writing field soon. 

Born 

To Ann Taylor Debevoise, a son, Eli Whit- 
ney, II, Feb. 8, 1953. 

To Juliette Weston Suhr a fourth child and 
second son, John Barber, Oct. 4, 1953. 

1943 

Marjorie Lehmann Moats has been doing 
television and radio work in Kansas City. 
She had a woman's show for 32 weeks on 
television and has done recorded radio com- 
mercials. She writes, "It's one kind of work 
that fits in with home life and child care 
harmoniously, because it's not full time. 
However, the time spent actually rehearsing 
and performing is more taxing and exacting 
than anything I've ever done before. My 
two boys are 2^ and 5^ now." 

1944 

Charlotte Leland writes, "I have been 
doing research on Myasthenia Gravis and 
reported the results (as co-author) in the 
Dec. 5 Journal of the American Medical Associa- 
tion. If anyone knows of a doctor who would 
be interested in studying the endocrine basis 
of this disease (identified by its neurological 
symptoms), please let me know. Although 
Myasthenia Gravis is uncommon, knowledge 
of its cause may well be a missing link in the 
understanding of such apparently remote 



diseases as arthritis and cancer. In Novem- 
ber, I had another cup operation on my 
hip, so I am busy recuperating now." 

Engaged 
Nancy Stone to Paul Franklin Heymann 
of Toledo, Ohio. Mr. Heymann is a graduate 
of Hotchkiss School and Yale University, 
1950. He served overseas in the Naval Re- 
serve and is treasurer of the Ohio Plate 
Glass Company in Toledo. 

Married 

Ann B. Cadmus to James F. McNamara, 
June 13, 1953, in Winchester Center, Conn. 

Born 

To Shirley Rhodes Lowe, a second child and 
first daughter, Susan Chase, Jan. 27, 1954. 

To Shirley Woodams Hoesterey, a third 
child and second son, Gregg, Feb. 25, 1954. 
Shirley writes, "We have spent the past year 
building a rather sizable addition on ouri 
home, doing all the work ourselves. It has 
meant much work, but loads of fun, too!" 

1945 

Barbara Beecher is teaching fourth grade 
in a private school just outside Philadelphia. 

Sally Leavitt Cheney writes, "We have a 
new son, Edward Drew, born Jan. 12, 1954. 
Dorothy is 3^ and Margaret \ x /i- My hus- 
band is Vice-Consul here in Penang. The 
whole family is enjoying life in the tropics 
ever so much. The 'emergency' here in 
Malaya seems almost unreal in this fascinat- 
ing and placid spot. There couldn't be more 
beautiful flowers, beaches, and mountains, 
and the town of Penang is a mixture old and 
new with half a dozen different races and 
cultures mingling. We have taken one long 
trip to the mountains in Central Malaya 
where we visited an aboriginal village 
(bought a blowpipe and spear) and a tea 
plantation, and shivered in the unaccustomed 
'cold' — 60 degrees!" 

Katharine Mulford, Mary Taylor, and 
Helen Taylor '48 spent five days touring 
Switzerland together last summer. Katha- 
rine is still working as Permissions Secretary 
at the Masters School in Dobbs Ferry. 

Bee Van Cleve is working with the Iraq 
Delegation to the United Nations. 

Born 
To Hilary Pater son Cleveland, a second 
child and first son, James Colby, Sept. 8, 
1953- 






r .O 



1946 

Nancy Burns Brelis and her family are in 
Rome for two years. 

Virginia Finney Rose writes that her 
husband is doing surgery in Rocky Mount, 
N. C. She has two children, Linda, 3, and 
Woods, 1. 

Anne Fisher Riker and her husband are 
now in San Diego. Her husband is a pilot, 
and spent several months in Florida in 
helicopter training. 

Muriel Greene Balmer visited Hope Whit- 
comb Gaillard this spring. 

Peggy Howe Ewing writes that her hus- 
band is practicing law in West Chester, Pa. 
They live on an old farm 12 miles from 
civilization. She has a 13-month-old daugh- 
ter, Molly. 

Dorothy King Garner and her husband 
are very busy fixing up an old house which 
they bought. Dottie is teaching piano on a 
small scale. 

Georgia Lee Mills O'Brien's husband is 
an instructor in History at Stanford. She 
has two children, Wick, 3, and Ellen, 15 
months. 

Harriet Stearns is working in the Country 
Store in Aspen, Colo., and "loves it." 

Polly Thomas Peck and her family are 
enjoying life in Charlotte, N. C. Polly's 
husband is selling dacron for the Du Pont 
Company. 

G. B. Wright James is very busy with her 
three children, and was unable to come to 
Andover for the Birthday Celebration. 

Engaged 
Frances Gorham to Theodore Postma, 
Jr., of Hopkinton, N. H. Mr. Postma at- 
tended New England College and the 
Rhode Island School of Design. Franny is 
working at MIT. 

Born 

To Noma Clayton Flint, a second child and 
first daughter, Lucy, March 4, 1954, in 
Madrid, Spain. Noma's husband has been 
! studying for his Ph.D. in Romance Lan- 
guages in Spain, and will teach at Dart- 
mouth this fall. 

To Elsa Hinchman Clark, a second child 
and first daughter, Leslie Hinchman, 
March 6, 1954. Elsa's son is now 3^. 

To Greta Leinbach Smith, a daughter, 
Sandra Leinbach, Feb., 1954. 

To Joyce Merrick Allen, a son, Christopher 
Norris,July5, 1953. 



To Carolyn Teeson Keller, a daughter, 
Meredith, Feb. 28, 1954. 

1947 

Ann Clemens Lowman writes that her 
husband is selling insurance in Europe. 
They are now living in Idar-Oberstein 
which is the stone-cutting center of the 
entire world. They are living with a German 
family, and Ann says she is making great 
progress with the language. 

Edith Flather served as a judge at the 
Greater Philadelphia Science Fair spon- 
sored jointly by the Franklin Institute and 
the Philadelphia Inquirer. 

Married 

Alden Obering to Paul Francis O'Brien, 
Jr., of Shreveport, La., Jan. 2, 1954, in 
Oklahoma City. Virginia Eason and Helen 
Hoehn were bridesmaids. 

Christine von Goeben to John Robert 
Curtis, Jr. of Dallas, Tex. Mr. Curtis was 
graduated from George Washington Uni- 
versity, received an M.A. degree from the 
School of Advanced International Studies 
of Johns Hopkins University, and was a 
Fulbright scholar in Vienna. He is program 
officer for Latin America in the Office of 
International Labor Relations of the Depart- 
ment of Labor. 

Born 

To Joy Kolins Peisch, a second son, Jeffrey 
Mark, Jan. 11, 1954. 

To Nancy Scripture Garrison, a daughter, 
Gay, March 17, 1954. 

1948 

Carol Jenkins has been studying at Car- 
negie Tech for the past two years working 
for her Master of Arts degree in Theatre 
Directing. 

Engaged 

Martha Grimshaw to Ens. Arthur Clark 
Bivin, USN, of Tampa, Fla. Ensign Bivin 
graduated from the U. S. Naval Academy in 

J953- 

Married 

L. Martha Barber to Dr. Preston Brooks 
Lowrance, Jr., March 13, 1954, in Anderson, 
Ind. 

Born 

To Brigid Bisgood Galusha, a daughter, 
Alison Grey, Aug. 2, 1953. 

To Jane Kenah Dewey, a daughter, Jane 
McElveen, March 12, 1954. 



5 1 



1949 

The class extends its sympathy to De- 
borah Williams Troemner whose father died 
in January. Debby and her husband are now 
living in Salina, Kansas, where her husband 
is in the Air Force. 

Engaged 

Susanne Jordan to Donald N. Zehl of 
New Haven, Conn. Mr. Zehl was graduated 
from the University of Connecticut and re- 
ceived an M.A. in Public Health from Yale. 
He is now attending the University of Ver- 
mont Medical School. Sue is an X-ray tech- 
nician at the Grace New Haven Hospital. 

Polly Anne Maddux to Ensign David 
Louis Harlow, USN of New York. Mr. Har- 
low attended Manhattan College and the 
United States Coast Guard Academy at 
New London. He completed naval flight 
training at Corpus Christi, Tex., and is sta- 
tioned with the Naval Air Arm at San 
Diego, Calif. 

Married 

Ann Chivers to Martin H. Stevens, June 
20, 1953. Mr. Stevens is a graduate of 
Exeter and Princeton. 

Katherine Ann Nesbitt to Fred D. Reese, 
Jr., Nov. 21, 1953. Mr. Reese, a graduate of 
Ohio Wesleyan University, is now serving in 
the U. S. Army. 

Lura Jane Noss to Lt. (j.g.) Bruce Eliot 
Bidwell, U.S.N.R. of West Hartford, Conn., 
May 22, 1954. Lt. Bidwell is a graduate of 
the Loomis School and Harvard College. 
He also studied at M.I.T. After serving for 
two years aboard the cruiser Baltimore, he is 
now communications officer at the Naval 
Supply Depot in Bayonne, N. J. 

Anne Stevens to George R. Bailey, Jr. of 
Englewood, N. J., May 8, 1954. Mr. Bailey 
was graduated from Phillips Andover and 
the United States Military Academy. 
Born 

To Tita Gonzalez Mann, a daughter, 
Melanie, Jan. 24, 1954. 

To Anne Wadleigh Gibert, a second child 
and first daughter, Julia Marion, Feb. 9, 
1954. Anne's son, Stephen Pierre, Jr., is a 
year old. Her husband who received a 
master's degree from Harvard is now work- 
ing on his Ph.D. at the Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity of Advanced International Studies. 

1950 

Cynthia Faigle is planning to go to Europe 
this summer on a student tour. She has been 



president of Chi Omega sorority this year, 

and was recently initiated into Zeta Phi 

Eta, the professional Speech Arts fraternity. 

Engaged 

Cynthia Atwood to Norman W. Couch of 
Washington, Conn. He is a graduate of 
Clark University, and is a sales engineer 
with the Torrington Company. Cynthia has 
been working for the YWCA in Boston, and 
spent six weeks abroad last summer. 

Alison Carter to John Galvin Mitchell of 
Cincinnati, Ohio. Mr. Mitchell was gradu- 
ated from Portsmouth Priory School and is a 
senior at Yale University where he is major- 
ing in Journalism. 

Married 

Carol Bernstein to Robert Louis Horo- 
witz, Dec. 20, 1953. Mr. Horowitz was 
graduated from Chauncy Hall School and 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

Ann Hartwell to Clark Douglas Fortner, 
Jan. 27, 1954, in Colorado Springs, Colo. 
Clark attended the University of Colorado. 
He is now with Silas Dean Corp., a sales aid 
business. Ann is finishing her college course. 
Born 

To Roberta Ann Gibbon Coates, a daugh- 
ter, Candace Lee, Dec. 11, 1953. 

1951 

Suzanne Batchelder has transferred to the 
University of New Hampshire. 

Alice Emmert served as a member of the 
committee in charge of the biannual con- 
ference of the New England section of the 
Athletic Federation of College Women held 
at Pembroke in March. 

Our sympathy is extended to Joan God- 
frey whose father died Feb. 24, 1954- 
Engaged 

Patricia B. Smith to George Dorland 
Langdon, Jr. of Salisbury, Conn. Mr. Lang- 
don is an alumnus of Pomfret School, and 
a senior at Harvard. 

Mary Macy Wheeler to Gardner Dudley 
Shepard of West Newton, Mass. Mr. Shepard 
was graduated from Phillips Andover and is 
a senior at Yale University School of Engi- 
neering. He is in the NROTC. 
Married 

Alison Faulk to Lt. Charles Fowler Curtis, 
of Hamden, Conn., Feb. 14, 1954, in Glou- 
cester, Mass. Lt. Curtis is a graduate of the j 
Hopkins School and Dartmouth College. He 
is stationed aboard the USS Union. 



52 



9t 9i> ^ime ta GUan,<j,e! 

All 3400 of us are scattered throughout the United States and in some 
foreign countries too. But no matter how many miles we live from Abbot we 
all were undoubtedly pleased to read of the $50,000 gift to Abbot for a new 
Gymnasium to be named for George E. Abbot, formerly President of our 
Board of Trustees. A new gymnasium is greatly needed to relieve the con- 
gestion and conflicting demands on Davis Hall at present. The girls, too, 
want a gymnasium, as evidenced by the gift of $486 last June by the Class of 
1953. Their dream will be realized sooner than they dared hope. 

Plans and a budget for the gymnasium, and a building fund committee 
of alumnae and trustees have been set up. The estimated cost of the building 
and equipment is $200,000, and the amount needed for endowment for 
maintenance and upkeep is $100,000, making a total of $300,000. Gifts to 
date total $62,525. This means the amount needed to complete the Fund is 

$237,475- 

No professional money-raiser has been hired; therefore, all gifts will go 

directly to the Fund. For the years 1954 and 1955 all alumnae contributions 
will go to the Gymnasium Fund after the normal scholarship needs of the 
school have been provided for. If any alumnae prefer to have their total gift 
assigned to Scholarships or to the Gymnasium Fund, they may so designate. 
The point is that the annual alumnae contribution for scholarships is a vital 
continuing part of the school's financial program. 

Abbot hopes to break ground for the George E. Abbot Memorial Gym- 
nasium next May — a year from now! Surely, if in 1929, on the school's 
1 ooth anniversary, the alumnae contributed $169,000 to the endowment fund, 
we, as a larger group of alumnae, in 1954, on the school's 125th anniversary 
can contribute at least $200,000. How many bricks will we buy to realize this 
dream of a new gym? 

The Gymnasium Building Fund has started 
Our sights are set toward the future 
The goal has yet to be reached 
How much will you contribute to its fulfillment? 

Helen Allen Henry '32 Mary Howard Nutting '40 

(Mrs. Lenert W.) (Mrs. Edmund W.) 

Chairman, Gymnasium Fund Chairman, Alumnae Fund 

53 



WUa& AteuA? 

1/oun, flame? l/awi Addlete? 

1/aub Gaieen? 

Please send news items to the Alumnae Office, Abbot Academy, Andover, 
Mass., before September 15, 1954. 



Today's date 

Maiden Name Glass 

Married Name 

Address 

Postal Zone 



ABBOT ACADEMY BULLETIN 

Series 21 SEPTEMBER, 1954 Issue 4 



Change of Address 
Issue 



Published four times yearly, October, February, May, and September, by Abbot Acad- 
emy, Andover, Massachusetts. 

Entered as second class matter December 1 2, 1 933, at the post office at Andover, Mass- 
achusetts, under the act of August 24, 191 2. 



Changes of Address Since February 

Bulletin 



Suggestion: Attach this to your 1952 Register. 



1878 
Swan, Florence 

161 Pine St., Portland, Me. 

1886 
Thompson, Emily B. Aff. 

Mrs. J. Parke Hood 

1202 Mohantongo St., Pottsville, Pa. 

1887 
Dunton, Angie M. 

Mrs. Marshall H. Purrington 
821 Bland St., Shelby ville, Ky. 
Wyer, Ernestine 

Mrs. Charles L. Mears 
49-F St., Chula Vista, Calif. 

1889 
Hinckley, Susie W. Aff. 

Mrs. William K. Webster 
Rose Haven, Litchfield, Conn. 
Joy, Alice H. 

Mrs. Richard H. Arms 

29 Perry St., New York, N. Y. 

1893 
Pearson, Belle C. Aff. 

Mrs. John P. Brooks 
Eliot, Maine 

1894 
Calhoun, Henrietta A. 

Mrs. Frank C. Bogart 
715 Gladiola, Victoria, B. C, Canada 
Draper, Charlotte Aff. 

Mrs. Arthur A. Brown 

Hotel Gramatan, Bronxville 8, N. Y. 

1896 
Franklin, Lillian 

Mrs. Ernest L. Carr 

1039 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge 38, Mass. 
Holt, Florence B. 

15 Phillips Rd., So. Portland, Me. 

1897 
Browne, Agnes C. Aff. 

Mrs. William G. B. Harland 
7 Homer Rd., Belmont, Mass. 

1898 
Coe, Anne H. 

Mrs. Berton E. Curry 

912 East 2nd St., Bloomington, Ind. 

1899 
Ryder, Mary E. 

The Grosvenor Hotel, 5th Ave. & 10th St., New 
York, N. Y. 

1901 
Clark, Katharine 

Mrs. David H. Canfield 

Route 2, Box 16, Carmel, Calif. 
Dodge, Lilian E. Aff. 

Mrs. Edwin T. Brewster 

58 Summer St., Andover, Mass. 
Lowe, Helen B. Aff. 

Mrs. Myron L. Crowe 

Sipson's Island, So. Orleans, Mass. 
Manson, Marion R. 

Mrs. Winthrop C. Adams 

250 Beacon St., Boston 16, Mass. 
Rockwell, Julia C. 

Mrs. George F. Bancroft 

104 59th Ave., St. Petersburg Beach, Fla. 



1904 
Case, Elizabeth S. 

Mrs. Stephen A. Staege 
626 Dick St., Hamilton, Ohio 
Deppen, Clara N. Aff. 

Mrs. Edward J. Ayars 

131 Springfield Rd., Elizabeth, N. J. 

1905 
Roberts, Ruth Aff. 

Mrs. Franklin Warden 
117 E. Colorado St., Pasadena, Calif. 
Tyer, Frances L. 

Mrs. Douglas G. Crawford 

679A Main St., Shrewsbury, Mass. 

1906 
Jellerson, Ethel Aff. 

Mrs. Perry Coons 

504 N. Osceola Ave., Clearwater, Fla. 

1907 
Lovering, Marion M. Aff. 

Mrs. William H. Linton 

8 Brigader, The Oakview, Collingswood, N. J. 

1908 
Chaffee, Helen E. Aff. 

Mrs. S. Perry Manville 

218^ 11th Ave., North, St. Petersburg, Fla. 
Cole, Marion 

Mrs. J. Burleigh Cheney 

Box 255, Providence 1, R. I. 
Rockwell, Marguerite Aff. 

104 59th Ave., St. Petersburg Beach, Fla. 

1909 
Elliot, Mildred W. Aff. 

Mrs. Harold A. Smith 

769 No. East 72 Ter., Miami, Fla. 
Gorton, Janet L. 

87 West Cedar St., Boston, Mass. 
Merriman, Mildred Aff. 

Mrs. Sydney Vere-Smith 

1440 So. Ocean Blvd., Palm Beach, Fla. 

1911 
Willard, Corrinne 

Mrs. Henry L. Dresser 

16913 Baylis, Detroit 21, Mich. 

1912 
Blake, Margery E. Aff. 

Mrs. Philip E. Tukey 

Birch Knolls, Cape Cottage, Me. 

1913 
Erving, Mary L. 

Mrs. Carl N. Lindsay 

936-A No. East Tenth St., Grants Pass, Ore. 
Estabrook, Gladys Aff. 

Mrs. Edward P. Blanchard 

420 South Beach St., Ormond Beach, Fla. 
Francis, Edna Mae 

Mrs. William T. Levitt 

R.D. 2, Laconia, N. H. 
Hersey, Helen W. 

Mrs. Roger T. Heffernan 

287 North St., Hingham, Mass. 
Sawyer, D. Elisabeth Aff. 

General Delivery, Albuquerque, N. M. 

1914 
Nelb, Gertrude Aff. 

Mrs. Raymond B. Gallant 

6550 Renaldo Way, St. Petersburg, Fla. 



1916 
Vdams, Katherine Aff. 

Mrs. E. Stewart Hall 

1579 Charlton Rd., San Marino, Calif. 
Freeman, Marjorie F. 

Mrs. Edson B. Heck 

R. D. 1, Spectacle Lane, Wilton, Conn. 
Kent, Marian L. Aff. 

Mrs. James H. Mitchell 

1st & Elm Sts., Westfield, N. Y. 
Leslie, Agnes J. 

P. O. Box 1957, Delray Beach, Fla. 
Dttman, Ruth A. 

Mrs. Edward J. Steiger 

100 Strawberry Hill, Apt. 2, Stamford, Conn. 

1917 
Davis, Esther K. 

Mrs. Andrew R. Smith 

3321 Park Ave., Bridgeport, Conn. 
Small, Dorothy 

Mrs. Oliver D. Wescott 

New Point Comfort, Englewood, Fla. 
Wuichet, Mary Elizabeth 

Mrs. Rutherford M. DeArmon 

Box 261-A, R. R. 1, Clayton, Ohio 

1918 
Cutting, Helen F. Aff. 

123 Mclver St., Greensboro, N. C. 
French, Helen W. 

Mrs. Jerome C. Greene 

Stoneleigh, Apt. 1-D, Bronxville, N. Y. 
Gray, Gertrude M. Aff. 

Mrs. Gertrude Davis 

316 Court St., Auburn, Me. 
Kunkel, Mary 

Mrs. Jules K. French, Jr. 

345 Manor Rd., Douglaston, Long Island, N. Y. 

1919 
Grover, Elizabeth W. Aff. 

Mrs. Robert T. Evans, Jr. 

4480 Congress St., Fairfield, Conn. 
Johnson, Muriel A. 

Mrs. Arnold W. Lovejoy 

429 Winchester St., Newton Highlands, Mass. 
Korst, Dorothy B. 

Mrs. F. C. P. Blodgett 

418 St. Lawrence Ave., Janesville, Wis. 
Leyser, Grace H. 

Mrs. Grace L. Boynton 

145 N. W. 15th St., Delray Beach, Fla. 
Murray, Geraldine Aff. 

Mrs. Hubert G. Stanton 

5 Grand View Ave., Cornwall-on-Hudson, N. Y. 
Wright, Edith E. 

Mrs. Edith W. Parr 

167 East Foothill Blvd., Altadena, Calif. 

1920 
Abbe, Julia 

Mrs. Merrill McKean Ross 

P. O. Box 5362, Cleveland, Ohio 
Polk, Helen P. 

Mrs. Harold S. Barker 

"Ogeedankee", Third Beach Rd., Newport, R. I. 
Warren, Georgia Aff. 

Mrs. Brownlee B. Gauld 

4801 East Broadway, Tucson, Ariz. 

1921 
Day, Margaret Burr Aff. 

Mrs. Richard W. Suydam 

66 Great Oak Dr., Short Hills, N. J. 
Piatt, Susan F. Aff. 

Mrs. Richard D. Cutting 

3680 Riverside Dr., Ann Arbor, Mich. 
Swan, Marion E. Aff. 

Mrs. Thomas O. Parnell 

Box 196, Winter Harbor, Me. 
Swift, Catharine B. Aff. 

Mrs. George H. Weller 

217 Medway St., Providence, R. I. 



1922 
Bartlett, Millicent D. Aff. 

Mrs. Millicent B. Holmberg 

2109 Continental, Costa Mesa, Calif. 
Burr, Geneva Aff. 

Mrs. Leslie B. Sanders 

27 Rose Ave., Marblehead, Mass. 
Petrikin, Charlotte 

Mrs. Elias S. Gregory 

33 Sunset Drive, Englewood, Colo. 
Upton, Dorothy Aff. 

Mrs. Dorothy U. Knowles 

2510 2nd Ave., S., Great Falls, Mont. 

1923 
Finch, Sarah E. 

Mrs. Arthur Hartwell 
613 State St., Lancaster, Pa. 
Reder, Dorothea T. Aff. 

Mrs. Ray E. Bolin 

26 Twin Spring Lane, St. Louis 17, Mo. 

1924 
Epler, Helen C. 

Mrs. Sherman T. Baketel 

3210 Wisconsin Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 
Tuttle, Elizabeth Aff. 
Mrs. John W. Burg 
9 South Mountain Dr., New Britain, Conn. 

1925 
Fleming, Jean Aff. 

Mrs. Dixon H. Smith 

4821 Pitt, New Orleans 15, La. 
Hanna, Charlotte M. 

Mrs. George B. Beveridge 

3384 Mathieson Dr., N.E., Atlanta, Ga. 
Hougen, Alice M. 

Mrs. Alice H. Ball 

Oenoke Rd., New Canaan, Conn. 
McDougall, Evelyn 

Mrs. Merrill A. Hay 

Birch Knolls, Cape Elizabeth, Me. 
Miller, Alice S. Aff. 

Mrs. Richard M. Spalding 

473 Hudson Ave., Newark, Ohio 
Simonds, Caroline Aff. 

Mrs. Harold M. Alexander 

2303 Evergreen Rd., Toledo 6, Ohio 

1926 
Merrick, Frances E. 

Mrs. John C. Lawrence 
800 So. Main St., Eureka, 111. 
Parker, Katherine L. 

144 East 40th St., New York 16, N. Y. 

1927 
Lyman, Hannah C. Aff. 

Mrs. Roland Blenner-Hassett 
951 Lincoln, Palo Alto, Calif. 

1928 
Haas, Charlotte A. Aff. 

Mrs. Linus C. Whitman 

26 Mars St., San Francisco, Calif. 
Hyde, Louise 

Mrs. William Reilly 

6 Pendegast, Woodland, Calif. 
Paret, Josephine G. 

Mrs. Richard A. Barrett 

Industrial College, Ft. McNair, Washington 25, 
D. C. 

1929 
Elliott, Barbara 

Mrs. T. C. Tevepaugh 

4212 Stuart Ave., Richmond, Va. 
Tobey, Louise 

Mrs. Sterling Dean 

1045 Ocean Ave., Santa Monica, Calif. 
Warden, Olive C. 

Mrs. Jean C. Schwenninger 

26 rue de la Liberation, Saint Martin de Vinoux, 
Isere, France 



1930 
Burridge, Marion S. Aff. 

Mrs. Grover L. Cleveland 

518 Hawthorne, Abilene, Texas 
Hart, Margery Aff. 

Mrs. Chappell Cory 

3 Bartlett Rd., Marblehead, Mass. 
Scheuer, Virginia Aff. 

Mrs. Virginia Blackburn 

Diamond S Ranch, Golconda, Nev. 
Shepard, Mary T. 

Mrs. Henry S. Wiley 

"Friendship" RFD 2, Valley Falls, R. I. 
Smith, Marianna 

Mrs. Heston H. Hile 

2517 East Dr., Fort Wayne 3, Ind. 
Tarr, Elizabeth 

Mrs. Judson P. Morse 

Devereaux Rocks, Marblehead, Mass. 

1931 
Bass, Miriam E. 

The Headlands, Rockport, Mass. 
Bettels, Metta L. 

Mrs. Roland F. W. Smith 

North Cedar Rd., Fairfield, Conn. 
Carr, Nancy W. 

Mrs. James D. Holmes 

% Major J. D. Holmes, Box 1756, Ft. Benning, 
Ga. 
Chipman, Faith 

Mrs. Edwin F. Parker 

2504 Washington St., Canton, Mass. 
Prentice, Catherine Aff. 

Mrs. J. A. White 

Box 222, Capitol Stat., Austin, Tex. 
Simon, Janet 

Mrs. Robert H. Smith 

131 Hartford Rd., Manchester, Conn. 

1932 
Burtt, Pauline H. 

Mrs. Frederick J. Wallace 

15 Phillips Rd., So. Portland, Me. 
Mailey, Buth L. 

V. A. Hospital Nurses Home, Livermore, Calif. 
Singleton, Mable Aff. 

Mrs. Frank A. Escoban 

708M Qrts. K, NASta., Quonset Point, R. I. 

1933 
Beecroft, Margaret B. Aff. 

Mrs. Edward I. Pratt, Jr. 

2703 Bellview Ave., Cheverly, Md. 
Black, Margaret 

Mrs. Merrill W. Manz, Jr. 

Rt. 1, Franklin Church Rd., Mansfield, Ohio 
Bice, Helen 

Mrs. F. Lawson Wiles, Jr. 

77 Edinboro St., Marlboro, Mass. 
Walker, Margaret 

Mrs. Sidney B. Whittier 

11 Kennedy Rd., Cambridge 38, Mass. 

1934 
Hoadley, Priscilla B. Aff. 

Mrs. Walden A. Chesley 

Quarters 53-1, Fort Joy, Governors Island, N. Y. 
O'Beilly, Sarah M. 

Mrs. Sarah O. Loria 

199 North Third St., Lock Haven, Pa. 
Stott, Buth 

Mrs. Lovett C. Peters 

3714 Chevy Chase 

Houston 19, Texas 

1935 
Clough, Elizabeth Aff. 

Mrs. Hugh Barndollar 

Beech Hill Rd., New Castle, N. H 
Hartman, Priscilla L. Aff. 

McComas, W. Va. 
Look, Ernestine Aff. 

Mrs. Sheldon L. Land 

217 Fremont Ave., So. Pasadena, Calif. 



Bivinius, Ellen M. 

Mrs. John C. Hill 

Lowell Rd., Concord, Mass. 

1936 
Eastlack, M. Mildred 

Mrs. Howard E. Gray 

2704 Peronne Ave., Norfolk 9, Va. 
Hawkes, Lucy 

Mrs. Wetherbee Lamson 

Box 251, Westford, Mass. 
Nichols, Grace 

Mrs. Douglas M. Knight 

211 South Union St., Appleton, Wis. 
Nourse, Virginia Aff. 

Mrs. Robert A. Salomon 

105 Larchmont Rd., Melrose 76, Mass. 
Beinhart, Barbara 

Mrs. DeWitt C. Livingston 

30Dursion Ave., Summit, N. J. 
Bobins, Ann N. 

Mrs. Wilfred R. Frank 

5200 Chestnut St., Bellaire, Tex. 
Bussell, Anne 

Mrs. Malcolm S. Loring 

Box 44, Naples, Me. 
Taylor, Jane Aff. 

Mrs. Frederick Barnicoat 

1259 Waverly PL, Elizabeth, N. J. 
Trafton, Mary 

Mrs. John L. Simonds 

3 Kennedy Rd., Cambridge 38, Mass. 
Wright, Sylvia 

Mrs. William F. Poole, III 

Love's Point, RFD 1, Leesburg, Fla. 

1937 
Holbrook, Cynthia 

Mrs. Warren E. Sumner, Jr. 

46 Roxbury St., Worcester 9, Mass. 
Kincaid, Nancy Aff. 

Mrs. Kincaid Vars 

Oak Lodge 

Alexandria Bay, N. Y. 
Peden, Edith H. 

% W. E. Doherty, 48 Lake, Hammondsport, 

Bichards, Priscilla M. 

Mrs. Richard Phenix 
21 Madbury Rd., Durham, N. H. 
Stevenson, Louise B. 

Mrs. Henry T. Anderson 
% American Embassy 
Havana, Cuba 

1938 
Abbott, Constance 

Mrs. William H. Schwab 

5 Sandra Lane, Deep Creek Blvd., Portsmouth, 
Va. 
Bridge, Beverly H. Aff. 

Mrs. James H. Moore 

126 West Shore Dr., Marblehead, Mass. 
Greene, Diana 

Mrs. Harry D. Helfrich, Jr. 

1718 Visalia Row, Coronado, Calif. 
McDonald, Elizabeth Aff. 

Mrs. John W. McCall 

1694 Bonita Ave., Mt. View, Calif. 
Owen, Calla M. Aff. 

Mrs. Donald E. Ross 

141 Sylvan Glen Dr., South Bend, Ind. 
Proctor, Madeleine 

Mrs. Donald R. Woodward 

102 Bank St., Burlington, Vt. 
Bice, Barbara L. Aff. 

Mrs. Jones B. Jackson 

1038th Auditor General, APO 925, % PM, San 
Francisco, Calif. 
Bussell, Jane 

Mrs. Arthur T. Brown 

18 Old Town Rd., Wellesley Hills 18, Mass. ' 
Tilton, Jean Aff. 

Mrs. Stanley H. Melby 

3 Old Coach Rd., Weston, Mass. 



Walworth, Dorothy 

Mrs. Francis C. Black 

1011 South Prince, Littleton, Colo. 

1939 
Lcland, Barbara 

Mrs. John H. Pearson 
62 Fairmount St., Lowell, Mass. 
Patterson, Mary Anne Aff. 

Mrs. William S. Hannan 
18 Fernridge Rd., West Hartford 7, Conn. 
Scanlan, Elizabeth 
Mrs. Roger I. Herrick 
Old Farm Circle, Cochituate, Mass. 

1940 
Bowen, Grace Aff. 

Mrs. Arthur L. Collins, Jr. 

907 Crestview Dr., Pasadena, Calif. 
Chadwick, Suzanne 

Mrs. Richard R. Bush 

332 Y PI., Laguna Beach, Calif. 
Colley, Marcia A. 

Mrs. W. Curtis Melton, Jr. 

420 Eton Ct., Ridgewood, N. J. 
Cross, Carolyn D. 

Mrs. Roger W. Robbins 

1341 South St., Geneva, 111. 
Downey, Charlotte 

Mrs. Frank J. Boutin 

1308 Jimeno Lane, Woodland, Calif. 
Meyer, Marietta 

Mrs. William A. Ekberg 

226 W. Blvd., Bismarck, N. D. 
Travis, Elizabeth 

Mrs. Harold D. Sollenberger 

4536 N. 26th St., Arlington, Va. 
Williams, Priscilla 

Mrs. Alan L. Dorian 

3751 Brewster Rd., Dearborn, Mich. 
Wilson, Nancy D. 

Mrs. William H. Ainslie 

122 Clive St., Metuchen, N. J. 
Wind, Gertrude 

Mrs. William Scheft 

101 Exeter St., West Newton 65, Mass. 

1941 
Dean, Dorothy V. Aff. 

Mrs. Mitchell Johnson, Jr. 

75 Central St., Andover, Mass. 
Knox, Eleanor C. 

100 East Chicago Ave., Chicago 11, 111. 
McCreery, Jessie A. 

Mrs. Philip M. Reed 

Box 49, Winter Park, Fla. 
Means, Harriet K. 

Mrs. John R. Kleiser 

103 Browning Lane, Villanova, Pa. 
Stott, Helen Binkerd 

Smith College, Northampton, Mass. 
Tyer, Martha 

Mrs. Nelson Curtis, Jr. 

431 Adams St., Quincy 69, Mass. 

1942 
Bishop, Jane A. 

Mrs. John L. Fahey 

1416 Thirtieth St., N.W., Washington 7, D. C. 
Daniels, Patricia Anne 

Mrs. Ray T. Hanson 

3504 88th, S. E., Mercer Island, Wash. 
Erkert, Dorothy J. 

Mrs. John E. Simon, Jr. 

205 W. Melbourne, Peoria, 111. 
Hardy, Beatrice M. 

Mrs. Francis del. Verdery 

400 Prospect St., Sherborn, Mass. 
Hudson, Lois 

Mrs. Henry R. Murphy 

48 East 53rd St., New York 22, N. Y. 
McFarlin, Margaret B. 

1st Lt. AN 2242768 3380th USAF Hospital, 

Keesler Air Force Base, Biloxi, Miss. 



Mcnschik, Marilyn 

Mrs. Robert Westaway, Jr. 

Oak Hill, Palmyra, Va. 
Sanders, Barbara Burr 

Mrs. Wilton W. Dadmun, 

27 Rose Ave., Marblehead, Mass. 
Sands, Thirsa 

Mrs. Robert S. Fuiks 

61 Washburn Ave., Wellesley Hills, Mass. 
Taylor, Ann 

Mrs. Thomas M. Debevoise, 2nd 

Hidden Springs Farm, Green Village, N. J. 
Weston, Juliette P. 

Mrs. Robert B. Suhr 

14675 Horseshoe Dr., Saratoga, Calif. 
Wyatt, L. Joan Aff. 

Mrs. Donald Bramley 

75-A Loomis Dr., West Hartford, Conn. 
Zimmermann, Sarah Prince 

Mrs. David Minard 

5941 Anniston Rd., Alta Vista Terr., Bethesda, 
Md. 

1943 
Janssen, Margaret S. Aff. 

Mrs. Joseph R. Gray 

McBurnay Hills, Lebanon, Ohio 
McLain, Hilton (Mimi) 

Mrs. Harry D. Greer 

1008 El Dan Mar PL, Vancouver, Wash. 
Ohnick, Barbara L. Aff. 

1005 E. Roy St., Apt. 22, Seattle 2, Wash. 
Patterson, Jane E. Aff. 

Mrs. Albert Tilney 

280 Pecos, El Paso, Tex. 
Pettengill, Patricia 

Mrs. John T. Whitaker 

3 Hopkins PI., Mariemont, Ohio 
Bichards, Ann H. 

266 Harvard St., Cambridge 39, Mass. 
Teel, Cynthia H. Aff. 

Mrs. David J. Vail 

609 Walker Ave., Baltimore 12, Md. 
Walker, H. Constance 

Mrs. Milton A. Thompson 

310 Point Rock Rd., San Angelo, Tex. 
Wiggin, Isabel S. 

Mrs. Frederic C. McDuffie 

119 Mountfort St., Boston 15, Mass. 

1944 
Cadmus, Ann B. 

Mrs. James F. McNamara 

32 Monroe St., Apt. B-611, New York, N. Y. 
Colson, Elisabeth 

Mrs. Albert G. Tierney, Jr. 

Nanepashemet St., Marblehead Neck, Mass. 
Damon, Patricia 

Mrs. G. Donald Niswander 

105 Pleasant St., Concord, N. H. 
Holmes, Cynthia 

Mrs. Gregory W. Spurr, Jr. 

121 East 34th St., New York 16, N. Y. 
Houston, Alva 

Mrs. Richard K. Davis 

Box 535, Bedford, N. Y. 
Lange, M. Frederica 

Mrs. John P. Dempsey 

313 So. 1st, Louisville 2, Ky. 
Beid, Elizabeth 

Mrs. Jesse M. Buzby, Jr. 

Box 201, San Salvador, El Salvador 
Bhodes, Shirley 

Mrs. Robert W. Lowe 

89 Park Circle, So. Attleboro, Mass. 
White, Patricia E. M. Aff. 

Mrs. Larry L. Larkin 

Westbrook, 10 Franklin Ave., White Plains, N. Y. 

1945 
Beecher, Barbara 

120 Glenwood Rd., Merion, Pa. 



Clark, Pamela H. 

Mrs. Christopher C. Coyne 

Y T,£°lS-r9S Oyne ' G_I Se ction, Hq. AFFE, 

APO 343, % P.M., San Francisco, Calif. 
Craig. Janet N. 

Mrs. Frederick W. Edwards, Jr. 

213 North First St.. Geneva, 111. 
Eccles, Dorothy Aff. 

Mrs. James A. deGanahl 

Rt. 1, Box 215D, Warrington, Fla. 
Hardon, Phyllis 

Mrs. James T. Gander 

646 Pine Lane, Winnetka, 111. 
Hodges, Helen 

Mrs. William S. Peppier, Jr. 

19 Castle Rd., Chappaqua, N. Y. 
Lazarus, Ruth S. 

Mrs. Edward H. Cole 

720 Red Blvd., Cincinnati 29, Ohio 
Milne, Marjorie C. 

Mrs. Manny Winston 

2264 Elm St., Manchester, N. H 
Mitchell, Janet 

Mrs. Burnell Poole, Jr. 

87 Oakhurst Rd., Cape Elizabeth, So. Portland 
Me. 

Mitchell, Joan 

Mrs. Edwin Neville 

1665 Hope St., Springdale, Conn. 
Redman, Janet 

Mrs. Samuel R. Hill, Jr. 

88 Elm St., North Andover, Mass. 
Robbins, Mary A. 

Mrs. Frederick R. Blue, Jr 
15 Ernest PI., Babylon, N. Y. 
Russell, Jean 

Mrs. Samuel Keavy 

9 Pine Cone Dr., Barrington, R. I. 

1946 
Allen, Sally 

Mrs. Samuel G. Waugh 
Wilton Rd., Westport, Conn. 
Barnard, Barbara Ann Aff. 
Mrs. Gordon E. Clement 
Robandy Rd., RD 1, Andover, Mass. 
Finney, Virginia Lee 
Mrs. Ira W. Rose, Jr. 
1316 Sunset Ave., Rocky Mount, N C 
Hill, Ann C. Aff. 

Mrs. Milbourne T. Gates 
1214-A North Osage Dr., Tulsa, Okla. 
Howe, Nancy Aff. 

71 Marlboro St., Boston, Mass. 
Kingsbury, Janet Aff. 
Mrs. Gene R. Littlefield 
32 Norman Rd., Melrose, Mass. 
Little, Frances A. 

1024 Parker, Detroit 14, Mich. 
Power, Sally Jean 

Mrs. Robert J. Hansman 
477 Hatherly Rd., No. Scituate, Mass. 
Ross, Elizabeth G. 
Mrs. Sam Griggs 

431-B West Garfield, Glendale, Calif. 
Stearns, Harriet P. Aff. 

Box 572, Aspen, Colo. 

Thomas, Mary J. (Polly) 

Mrs. Howard D. Peck 

5030 Valley Stream Rd., Charlotte 3, N. C. 
Thomas, Nancy 

Mrs. Arthur B. Whitcomb 
615 Cherry St., Winnetka, 111. 
Woodruff, Elizabeth L. 
Mrs. Hugh J. Caperton, Jr. 
R. R. 5, Shelbyville, Ky. 

, ,. 1947 

Aulis, Ann H. 

Mrs. Thomas J. Ronan, Jr. 
19 Claybourne St., Dorchester, Mass. 
Barnard, Nancy P. 

Mrs. Lawrence C. Soule, Jr. 

81 Brookdale Gardens, Apt. D, Bloomfield, N. J 



Brimer, Ruth N. Aff. 

Mrs. William B. McCredie 

Box 38, Wayne, III. 
Brumback, Nancy 

Mrs. Mark M. Kruvand 

1515 Missouri St., Houston, Tex 
Campbell, Joanna 

Mrs. Weyman S. Crocker 

33 Saratoga Drive, Scotia 2, N Y 
Shivers, Lucy Dee 

Mrs. Ezra Lovell Bixby 

15 Newport Ave., Newport, R. I 
Ueraens, Ann B. 

Mrs. Shepard C. Lowman 

V&£ BarCf P^ 35 ' FrSnkfUrt ' A/M ' ° ermany 

Mrs. Wallace L. Bolton 

RFD 3, Bradford, Mass. 
Derby, Lois Ann 

Mrs. Julius W. Taylor 

% A^abia an Amedcan Qil Co - Dhahran, Saudi 
Dowd, Helen R. 

Mrs. Gilbert B. Richards, Jr 

3325 Burnet Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio 
tjrierasch, Emily 

Mrs. John M. Savage 

391 Eastwood Ave., Jacksonville, N. C 
Ooddard, Barbara 

Mrs. Peter P. Theg 

3403 Avondale Rd., Knoxville, Tenn 
Kolins, Joy L. 

Mrs. Daniel Peisch 

1010 S Buchanan St., Arlington, Va 
Lewis, Lillian Jane 

Mrs. Jerome B. Gleason 

20516 Indian, Detroit, Mich. 
McLean, Carol 

119 Charles St., Boston, Mass. 
Obering, P. Alden 

Mrs. Paul F. O'Brien Jr 

Box 788, Rt. 4, Shreveport, La. 
Sawyer, Shirley Aff. 

Mrs. M. Lee Williams 

848 Wild wood Rd., Roanoke, Va. 
Scripture, Nancy Jane 
Mrs. Frederick Garrison 
429 King St., % Scripture, Cohasset, Mass. 

t» , !948 

isarber, L. Martha 

Mrs. Preston B. Lowrance Jr 

307 Preston Ct., Charlottesville, Va 
Bigelow, Katharine H. 

Mrs. Thomas M. Fitzgerald Jr 

92 Pierce Rd., Watertown 72, Mass 
Bisgood, Brigid 

Mrs. Neal M. Galusha 

359 Gardner Rd., Horseheads, N. Y 
Booth, Dorothy L. 

Mrs. George O. Witwer 

3015 Robinhood Lane, South Bend, Ind 
Carroll, Nancy Marie 

Mrs. Holland R. Donan 

167 Branch Brook Drive, Belleville N J 
Cookman, Nadine T. 

Mrs. Raymond A. Price 

Northfield Rd., Lunenburg, Mass. 
Gillen, Patricia Aff. 

Mrs. Preston C. Haglin 

4383 Wooddale Ave., Minneapolis, Minn. 
Grimshaw, Martha 

107 31st St., Altoona, Pa. 
Hammond, Patricia 

Mrs. Robert N. Duffy 

1132 Tenth Ave., Schenectady, N. Y. 
Hellier, H. Louise 

47 King St., New York 14, N. Y. 
Howe, Elizabeth Aff. 
Mrs. Philip B. Howard 
122 Mt. Auburn St., Apt. 2-B, Cambridge, Mass. 



'Howe, Mary Louise 

Mrs. Charles T. Brumback 

2849 Kendale Dr., Toledo 6, Ohio 
Kenah, Jane 

Mrs. Henry B. Dewey 

8 Fenimore Rd., Worcester, Mass. 
Kinney, Ruth H. 

Mrs. Richard F. Gould 

6 Stratford Rd., Andover, Mass. 
MacManus, Josephine 

Mrs. William A. Woods 

17 Bon Mar, Pelham Manor, N. Y. 
Muessel, Mary Grace 

Mrs. Lewis L. Pulling 

1231 E. Eckman St., So. Bend 14, Ind. 
Robinson, Ann 

Mrs. Jack B. Joyce 

918 West Armstrong St., Kingsville, Tex. 
Selden, Mackay 

Mrs. Robert H. Bush 

100 Cedar St., Dobbs Ferry, N. Y. 
Sinclaire, Mary C. 

Mrs. James R. Morris, IV 

2801 Jasmine St., Denver 7, Colo. 
Taylor, Helen 

Mrs. Frank Dodd 

59 Manor Dr., Red Bank, N. J. 
Wallis, Eleanor O. 

428 East 58th St., New York 22, N. Y. 
Whitaker, Ellen M. Aff. 

R.F.D. 2, Plainview Rd., Huntington, N. Y. 
Zuckerman, Mary B. 

Wye Mills, Md. 

1949 
Ashirvatham, Premi 

Mrs. John Eills 

2 Holyoke St., Cambridge, Mass. 
Backes, Barbara M. 

Mrs. Lawrence D. North 

93 Maple Ave., North Haven, Conn. 
Chivers, Ann D. Aff. 

Mrs. Martin H. Stevens 

15 Boudinor St., Princeton, N. J. 
Cowles, Nancy C. Aff. 

Mrs. William H. Black 

25 Phillips St., East Haven, Conn. 
Jordan, Susanne 

804 Howard Ave., New Haven, Conn. 
Nesbitt, Katherine (Sally) 

Mrs. Fred D. Reese, Jr. 

105 Frank St., Elizabethtown, Ky. 
Noss, Lura Jane 

Mrs. Bruce E. Bidwell 

Goldsborough Housing, Bldg. 3, Apt. 335, Bay- 
onne, N. J. 
Rogal, Nancy 

Mrs. Albert Cohen 

36 Highland Ave., Cambridge, Mass. 
Stevens, Anne 

Mrs. George R. Bailey, Jr. 

250 West 24th St., Apt. 5-E, New York, N. Y. 
Webster, Joan M. 

Mrs. Alexander C. Post 

Sunset Rock Rd., Andover, Mass. 
Williams, Deborah D. 

Mrs. R. Wallace Troemner, Jr. 

716 Choctaw Dr., Salina, Kan. 

1950 
Bernstein, Carol Aff. 

Mrs. Robert L. Horowitz 

85 Chatham Rd., Brockton, Mass. 
Burke, Patricia Ann 

Mrs. John M. Wright 

29 N. 25th, Lawton, Okla. 
Davis, Georgette 

Mrs. Giovanni Ferrante 

1326 Coffey St., Pampa, Tex. 
Dithmer, Tove 

1170 Fifth Ave., New York 29, N. Y. 



Flather, Beverly F. 

Mrs. Charles G. Edwards 

349 A Chicago Ave., Palatine, 111. 
Gibbon, Roberta Ann 

Mrs. Neligh Coates, Jr. 

702 Ridge Ave., Evanston, 111. 
Gray, Nancy Jean 

134 Beacon St., Boston 16, Mass. 
Griffin, Joyce 

Mrs. Richard B. Kurz 

15048 Culley St., Victorville, Calif. 
Hartwell, Ann 

Mrs. Clark D. Fortner 

1160 So. Glencoe, Denver 20, Colo. 
Merriwether, Ann 

Mrs. Leslie B. Disharoon 

440 Riverside Dr., Studio F, New York 27, N. Y. 
Shulze, Nancy 

Mrs. Elliott S. Lamb 

420 Fairview Ave., Ft. Lee, N. J. 

1951 
Bissell, Anne 

R. D. 2, Dalton, Pa. 
DeNoyelles, Ruth Ann Aff. 

Mrs. Robert E. Diefenbach 

3440 Ridgewood Ave., Apt. 39, Montreal, Can. 
Faulk, Alison B. 

Mrs. Charles F. Curtis 

1000 Second St., Coronado Beach, Calif. 
Grieco, Edna 

Mrs. Thomas Jay Thomas 

205 Morton St., San Antonio, Tex. 
Palacios, Flor de M. 

Mrs. Hero Duterloo 

P. O. Box 353, Curacao, N. A. 
Wheeler, Mary Macy 

Mrs. Gardner D. Shepard 

9455 Granby St., Norfolk, Va. 

1952 
Edwards, Jane 

Mrs. Eugene E. Holbrook 

6200 Montgomery Dr., South Miami, Fla. 
Reynolds, Clara E. 

Mrs. Joseph B. Palmer 

254 High St., Portland, Me. 
Sontum, Randi M. Aff. 

Mrs. James C. Fegley 

% Lt. James C. Fegley, 45th Ftr. Sqn., APO 1 1 7, 

% PM, New York, N. Y. 

1953 
Giles, Dorothy 

19 Smith Ave., Methuen, Mass. 
Sippy, Canaille 

1630 Irving St., N.W., Washington, D. C. 

1954 
Kase, Gretchen Lynn 

411 East Mason St., Milwaukee, Wis. 
Nolde, Frances 

1532 29th St., N.W., Washington, D. C. 

1955 
Emery, M. Charlotte Aff. 

231 Randolph Ave., Milton, Mass. 
Howes, Caroline L. Aff. 

10 Rayson Lane, Dobbs Ferry, N. Y. 

1956 
Winchell, Charlotte K. Aff. 

1038 Baldwin, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

PAST FACULTY 
Brown, Mrs. William (McMurry, Idanelle S.) 

1314 Richmond Ave., Houston 6, Tex. 
Cutter, Mrs. Louis A. (Hornor, Ann) 

308 Woodnor St., New Brunswick, N. J. 
Juthe, Mrs. Kristian A. (Helen D. Bean) 

P. O. Box 57, Altamonte Springs, Fla. 



il$ * ■'■■ »* 

w * I 



J. * w : 



': 



Si lU , 



it f? '■ i"l 















Hi 









.^^^fc llBIt 



11 




iki yu? v 



j;iij:;iii;;;sfe;: 



Ih 






lllif IB 

" V |M|||,| I ^^ HaMMMB»« 



sMSs : . ■■:"'■ ■ 



Abbot Academy Bulletin 

October 1954 



ABBOT ACADEMY BULLETIN 



Series 22 



OCTOBER, 1954 



Issue i 



Abbot Academy Alumnae Association 

Associate Member of the American Alumni Council 



President 
Miss Irene Atwood 
180 Commonwealth Ave. 
Boston 16, Mass. 

Vice-presidents 

Mrs. Edmund W. Nutting 
(Mary Howard) 
21 Wave Ave. 
Wakefield, Mass. 

Miss Dorothy Taylor 
118 Elgin Street 
Newton Centre 59, Mass. 

Mrs. A. Lawrence Van Wart 
(Betty Weaver) 
160 Melrose Place 
Ridgewood, N. J. 



OFFI CERS— 1 954- 1 956 

Clerk 

Mrs. Robert C. Holland 
(Barbara Healey) 
211 Chestnut Street 
Andover, Mass. 

Treasurer 
Mrs. Lawrence D. Bragg, Jr. 
(Mary Dooley) 
Alden Road 
Andover, Mass. 

General Secretary 
Miss C. Jane Sullivan 
97 Knox Street 
Lawrence, Mass. 



Alumnae Trustees 
1951-1957 
Mrs. H. Guyford Stever 
(Louise Risley) 
36 Fairmont Street 
Belmont, Mass. 

1954-1960 
Mrs. Herbert P. Carter 
(Pauline Humeston) 
163 Glenwood Road 
Englewood, N. J. 



ABBOT CLUB PRESIDENTS 



BOSTON 
Mrs. Robert H. Marsh 
(Dorothy Beeley) 
32 Williams Road 
Lexington 73, Mass. 

CHICAGO 

Mrs. Floyd Siiumway 
(Margaret Rabling) 
815 East Deerpath 
Lake Forest, Illinois 

CONNECTICUT 

Mrs. Donald Hoggson 
(Gertrude Drummond) 
R.F.D. 
Lakeville, Conn. 

DETROIT 
Mrs. Howard H. Fitzgerald 
(Jean Craig) 
19091 Bedford Road 
Birmingham, Michigan 



MAINE, EASTERN 

Mrs. Richard Roberts 
(Dorothy Spear) 
Payson Road 
Falmouth Foreside, Maine 

MAINE, WESTERN 

Mrs. Frank N. Wells 
(Louise Houghton) 
32 Ship Channel Road 
South Portland, Maine 



NEW YORK 

President 
Mrs. Lucien R. Tharaud 
(Cynthia James) 
17 East 96th Street 
New York 28, N. Y. 



OHIO, CENTRAL 
Mrs. John B. Gager 
(Thelma Mazey) 
228 N. Drexel Avenue 
Columbus 9, Ohio 

OHIO, CLEVELAND 
Mrs. Jerry L. Mercer 
(Molly Hubbard) 
19560 Telbir Ave. 
Rocky River 16, Ohio 

OLD COLONY 
Mrs. Oscar M. Finger 
(Martha Wind) 
8 Belcher Avenue 
Brockton, Mass. 



THE EDITORIAL BOARD 

Jane B. Carpenter, 1892, honorary 
Constance Parker Chipman, 1906, honorary 
C.Jane Sullivan, 1931, Editor-in-Chief 
Irene Atwood, 191 8, ex officio 



Published four times yearly, October, February, May, and September, by Abbot Acad- 
emy, Andover, Massachusetts. 

Entered as second class matter December 12, 1933, at the post office at Andover, Mass- 
achusetts, under the act of August 24, 191 2. 



Fall Calendar — 1954 



September 21 

September 22 

September 25 

September 26 

October 2 



October 3 

October 9 

October 10 

October 16 

October 17 

October 23 

October 24 

October 30 

October 31 

November 6 

November J 



November 13 

November 14 

November 20 

November 21 

November 24 

November 2 J 

November 28 

December 4 
December 5 

December 11 

December 12 

December 14 



Arrival and registration of new resident students 

Arrival and registration of re-entering resident students 

Picnic at Ipswich Beach 

Old girl-new girl party 

Vespers — Miss Hearsey 

Senior Picnic 

Noeline Chute and William Hunt — "Over the Footlights" — 
Dramatic Entertainment 

Vespers — The Reverend Raymond Calkins, D.D., Pastor 
Emeritus, First Church in Cambridge 

Dr. John T. Cocutz — "Will there be a Revolution behind the 
Iron Curtain?" 

Vespers — The Reverend A. Graham Baldwin, D.D., of Phil- 
lips Academy 

Fall Homecoming Day — Alumnae-Student Hockey Game. 

Margaret Deneke — Lecture-Recital 

Vespers — The Reverend Robert Metters, D.D., Emmanuel 
Church, Boston 

United Nations Program by the Forum Group. 

Vespers — Mrs. Dorothy Waldo Phillips 

Movie at Abbot 

Northfield Vespers 

Movie at Abbot 

Boston Symphony Concert 

Vespers — The Reverend Alexander St.-Ivanyi, D.D., The 
First Church of Christ, Lancaster, Massachusetts 

Andover- Exeter Game at Andover 

Student Recital 

Senior-Mid Talent Show 

Vespers — The Reverend Hans Sidon, Ph.D., Christ Presby- 
terian Church, Lawrence 

Thanksgiving Service 

Piano Recital by Miss Kate Friskin 

Vespers — The Reverend Palfrey Perkins, D.D., Minister 
Emeritus of King's Chapel in Boston 

Fall Play — Dramatics Group 

A.C.A. Christmas Vespers 

A.C.A. Christmas Party for children 

Christmas Reading by Miss Hale 

Vespers — Christmas Service — Miss Hearsey 

School closes for Christmas vacation 



In the last issue of the Bulletin all of you who were unable to attend the 
celebration of our 125th anniversary had an opportunity to read about the 
week end and to see many of your friends. Incidentally I heard one "old 
girl" say, "I'll come back if you'll promise not to publish my picture." Well, 
though many may feel that way, the pictures are of great interest, I think, and 
I assure you that those who were "taken" at the class luncheon were having 
a gay time and though there were silver threads among the gold; and 
though many were fair, fat, and fortyish, one heard on all sides the sincerely 
felt sentiment "My dear, you haven't changed a bit." 

Although the old girls found a good many changes in the physical ap- 
pearance of the school, I think there was no one who was not pleased and 
proud as she saw that the changes were all toward greater beauty as well as 
usefulness and that the essential quality and homelikeness of Abbot has not 
changed. 

Of course one big topic of interest was the New Gymnasium, and plans 
for raising the money. The appeals were sent out in May, as you all must 
know, and the response so far has been very gratifying. Elsewhere in this 
issue of the Bulletin you will find a statement of progress up to this date. 
Of course we have a long way to go still, and if we are to achieve our goal, 
all who possibly can do so must help, and everyone must give as generously 
as her means allow. To carry on the full rounded program of the school in an 
efficient way we cannot continue much longer using Davis Hall as an audi- 
torium and gymnasium. And today more than ever the value of the physical 
education program for young people is realized as most essential. With every 
young person, the non-athletic type as well as the sport enthusiast, the physi- 
cal education teacher can contribute to character development in a way that 
can be paralleled in no other department. It is my very great hope that all 
whose own experience here is one they are grateful for will try to express that 
gratitude in helping us meet this present need. We earnestly hope that we 
may have in hand enough of the total amount required by next summer so 
that we may be able to break ground in 1955. 

The 126th year of Abbot has begun with the largest enrollment in the 
history of the school, 162 boarders and 39 day scholars, exactly two hundred 
and one girls. The pressure for admission has been greater than I have ever 
known it to be in my eighteen years. A similar situation exists in all good 
schools this year, I believe, and bids fair to continue for some years to come as 
the secondary schools are now beginning to feel the population increase of 
the post depression and the war years. But in addition to this, doubtless 
many parents have been affected by the widespread criticism of the public 
schools. While it is unfair to indict our public education as indiscriminately 
as many writers and speakers have done, there has been definite and specific 
evidence in many places of the abandoning of solid content for perhaps useful 



but non-intellectual material, and the child who has ability to go to a liberal 
arts college and whose parents want her or him to be adequately trained, 
must turn to the schools where emphasis is still on mental discipline and on 
encouraging rather than levelling down individual excellence. If our country 
is not to be destroyed by the dominance of those who win the masses by 
fears and prejudices, we must have a younger generation of individuals who 
can think for themselves and who have some knowledge of history and liter- 
ature and science, and the ability to analyze the written and spoken word, 
and to write and speak for themselves with logical clarity and sane judg- 
ment. This is the goal of Abbot and of all schools that can be said to serve 
the public good. Every graduate of Abbot should be clearly aware of her 
heritage in having had her schooling for several years in such an atmosphere, 
and should be actively concerned not only in promoting the welfare of Abbot 
but of all schools public or private that give evidence of such aims. 

This school year is young and full of promise. I hope that many of you 
may be able to keep in touch with it, either through your alumnae clubs or a 
visit to us, as well as through the Bulletin. The next general alumnae 
gathering will be in May again as that seems to be, by the general consensus 
of those who were here last May, the best date for reunions. Good wishes to 
you all as you go into your winter's activities ! It is gratifying to think that all 
over this country and indeed in many other countries you are playing your 
part as intelligent parents, business women, teachers, and citizens. 



Club News 



Boston 

The first meeting of the year was held October i at the home of Gwen- 
dolyn Bloomfield Tillson '22 in Bedford, Mass. Professor William Jewell of 
Boston University gave a Water Color Demonstration. 

Eastern Maine 

A luncheon meeting was held in Damariscotta, Maine, on July 13. 

Old Colony 

The annual meeting will be held October 30 at the Guest House in 
Taunton, Mass. Mabel Rhodes Manter 1907 will be the speaker. 



New Alumnae Relatives 

Elizabeth Artz— sister of Martha Artz, 1952 

Anne Bowden— sister of Janet Bowden, 1953 

Josephine Bradley — cousin of Muffy Grant, 1953 

Judith Callahan — sister of Grace Callahan, 1956 

Judith Carpenter — cousin of Pamela Carpenter, 1955 

Leonora Parsons Colby— daughter of Alice Cooper Armstrong, 1935; 
granddaughter of Leonora Parsons Cooper, 1907 

Nancy Josephine Cooper — sister of Betsy Cooper, 1954 

Margo de Cholnoky— sister of Panna de Cholnoky, 1954; cousin of Cora- 
Alice St. John, 1 95 1, and Cornelia St. John, 1954 

Cecilia Gomez — sister of Catalina Gomez, 1953 

Penelope Holbrook— sister of Deborah Holbrook, 1956; niece of Cynthia 
Holbrook Sumner, 1937 

Carolyn Coolidge Kimball— sister of Rachel Kimball, 1 956 

Frederica Tod Owsley— niece of Mary Jane Owsley Warwick, 1 930, and 
Elizabeth Ogden Tod, 1948 

Ellen Parker— daughter of Faith Chipman Parker, 1931; granddaughter of 
Constance Parker Chipman, 1906; grandniece of Esther Parker Lovett, 
1908, and Eugenia Parker, 191 6; great-granddaughter of Fanny Fletcher 
Parker, 1872 

Sheila Susan Prial— sister of Paula Prial, 1954 

Susan Rairdon — sister of Phyllis Rairdon Wilce, 1946 

Carol Shove Reed— daughter of Katharine Damon Reed, 1934; niece of 
Patricia Damon Niswander, 1944 

Shirley May Slater— daughter of Theodora Talcott Slater, 1928; grand- 
daughter of May Churchill Talcott, 1895; grandniece of Rose Churchill, 
aff. 1897 

Deborah Tillson— daughter of Gwendolyn Bloomfield Tillson, 1922; niece of 
Barbara Bloomfield Wood, 1926; cousin of Barbara Wood Emmons, 1951, 
and Joan Wood, 1952 

Betsey Louise White— daughter of Charlotte Hudson White, 1923; sister of 
Mary Lo White, 1947; cousin of Suzanne Martin, 1953 



NEW ALUMNAE RELATIVES PICTURED ON COVER 

Left to right— Penelope Holbrook, Judith Carpenter, Carolyn Kimball, Carol Reed, Cecilia 

Gomez, Deborah Tillson, Susan Rairdon, Nancy Cooper, Frederica Owsley, Margo de 

Cholnoky, Shirley Slater, Leonora Colby, Sheila Prial, Ellen Parker, Anne Bowden, Judith 

Callahan, Elizabeth Artz. Josephine Bradley and Betsey White were absent. 



Faculty Facts 



Changes. Among those who will not be returning next year we must 
with the deepest regret record the fact that Mrs. Reeves has found it neces- 
sary to resign. A serious illness last spring has made it clear that she cannot 
continue to carry the heavy responsibilities of her position. All the girls who 
have been at Abbot during the last eight years came into frequent contact 
with Mrs. Reeves and all admired and loved her. To say that she will be 
missed is all too inadequate. We are happy to report that she is much better 
and expects to come to visit us during the year. (Mrs. Reeves's address is: 
6224 Nineteenth Street North, Arlington, Virginia). 

To undertake Mrs. Reeves's responsibilities Mrs. Anne L. Osborne has 
come to join the faculty as Director of Residence. Mrs. Osborne attended the 
Brearley School and Barnard College. After her marriage she lived abroad 
for three years. Since her husband's death, Mrs. Osborne has made her life 
interesting and useful through participation in various community activities. 
She has a son and a daughter, the latter entering Bennington College this 
year. Mrs. Osborne is much interested in music and art and in people. She is 
well qualified to carry on Mrs. Reeves's work. 

Mile. Baratte who had to give up her work at spring vacation last year 
because of illness, is in the Essex Tuberculosis Sanitarium, at Danvers, Mass- 
achusetts, and it is a pleasure to report that she is making excellent progress. 
Her substitute for the spring term was Mrs. Arlon Clarke. Mrs. Clarke 
made a real place for herself in the two months she was with us, and we 
would only too gladly have kept her, but as she could not accept a resident 
post and lived too far away to commute throughout the year we had reluc- 
tantly to let her go. 

Miss Marjon Ornstein comes to us from Ashley Hall, South Carolina, to 
take Mile. Baratte's classes. Miss Ornstein, a native of Holland, attended 
Guilford College, North Carolina (A.B. 1949) and has a M.A. from Middle- 
bury College. Miss Ornstein has studied also in Paris for three years and has 
spent this past summer abroad. 

Another great loss to us this year is Miss Adele Bockstedt. Miss Bock- 
stedt, who had been at Abbot since 1949, is taking a post at the Winsor 
School in Boston. It is a small crumb of comfort to know that she "would not 
have left Abbot for any other boarding school." Her contributions have been 
many to the school, aside from her excellence as a teacher of French. 

In Miss Bockstedt's place we are having Miss Edith Temple Jones who 
for the past five years has been teaching French at Stuart Hall in Staunton, 
Virginia. Miss Jones is a graduate of Middlebury College; she has studied 
also in France and at McGill University. Before going to Stuart Hall Miss 
Jones had taught for a number of years at St. Faith's Episcopal School for 
Girls at Saratoga Springs, New York. 

Miss Virginia Peddle who has done a splendid job in the Physical Edu- 



cation Department for four years, especially in the field of Modern Dance, 
has resigned to try her wings elsewhere. She is to be teaching at the Spence 
School in New York City. Miss Peddle came to Abbot directly from college 
and gave evidence from the beginning of her gift in her special field. 

Miss Lucette Bowers, Wellesley '53, and M.A. Sarah Lawrence, '54, is 
to take over Miss Peddle's teaching. Miss Bowers majored in Music at Welles- 
ley and specialized in Modern Dance at Sarah Lawrence. She has had ex- 
perience in summer theatre musical shows and this summer she was a mem- 
ber of Charles Weidman's dance group in New York City. 

Miss Agnete Wulff who came to us in the fall of '52 from England, 
quickly made a place for herself at Abbot. Her pupils found her teaching 
lively and inspiring, and all the girls who worked under her direction in two 
Shakespeare plays will always be grateful for that experience. All of us wish 
that she could have stayed with us longer. She has returned to her home, 
however, (Ship House, Burstead Close, Cobham, Surrey, England) and will 
be teaching again at her old school — the Wimbledon High School. 

In Miss WulfPs place we are to have Miss Violet Edmonds who is to be 
on leave from the Wimbledon High School. Miss Edmonds holds a B.A. 
from Cambridge University, with an Honours Degree in English. She is 
Senior English Mistress at the Wimbledon High School where she was one of 
Miss Wulff's teachers and later a colleague. This new link with England con- 
tinues a pattern begun with our happy association with Miss Dorothy Baker 
and continued through Miss Wulff and Miss Tinker. We hope that Miss 
Edmond's school can spare her to us for at least two years. 

Mrs. Mary Crane, another new member of the English Department, is 
to take the place of Miss Kornor (now Mrs. Louis Cutter, 308 Woodnor 
Street, New Brunswick, New Jersey) . Although Miss Hornor was with us for 
only one year, she endeared herself to us, and we had reluctantly to let her 
go for a reason not to be gainsaid. 

Mrs. Crane is a graduate of the Winsor School and of Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege. She has recently since her husband's death been teaching English, but 
before her marriage had been on the staff of the Boston Museum of Fine 
Arts, lecturing about exhibitions of paintings sent out to schools. Mrs. Crane, 
besides her English classes, will teach History of Art and be Curator of the 
John-Esther Art Gallery. Mrs. Crane will not be "living in" as she has four 
little girls, but she will be living at 9 Abbot Street so that she can be closely 
associated with us and we with her and her charming daughters aged from 
three to twelve ! 

Miss Margaret Cassidy is to be an additional member of the faculty to 
help in teaching English and Mathematics. Miss Cassidy is a graduate of 
Vassar College (1942). Her experience has been varied and interesting, in- 
cluding editorial work with Time Magazine; production assistant and business 
manager in dramatic activities; and for the last four years Secretary in the 
Foreign Information Service of the United States Government in Vienna. 

Miss Blanche Gray who for thirty-three years has been on the house- 



keeping staff at Abbot and for fifteen years assistant to Miss Coolidge, the 
House Superintendent, retired in August, shortly before reaching her eighty- 
first birthday. To all who know Miss Gray her youthful vigor and her capaci- 
ty for long hours of work in which she took the greatest satisfaction, have 
been a constant source of amazement. It is hard to imagine Abbot without 
her trim, erect figure, bustling about to check on every nook and cranny 
with an eye for perfection in house-keeping; or supervising with accuracy 
and unfailing patience and good humor the multitude of detail in the ex- 
press, parcel-post, and dry cleaning office. We are fortunate in having Mrs. 
Bonde who before coming to Abbot as head waitress had been Housekeeper 
at the Ethel Walker School, ready and willing to take over Miss Gray's work. 
Miss Gray is making her home with her sisters in Somerville — 29 Whit- 
field Road, West Somerville — and we can look forward to seeing her occa- 
sionally. We hope that she will enjoy her new leisure, but we doubt, actually, 
that she will ever be found doing nothing ! 

Summer Activities. Mile. Arosa spent the summer with her family 
in Paris. 

Miss Coffin spent a month on the continent of Europe, and then re- 
turned to England for two months. She revisited Harrogate where she taught 
last year, and took auto trips through Eastern England, Devon, and Corn- : 
wall. She attended the meetings of the British Association for the Advance- 
ment of Science at Oxford. 

Miss Friskin spent the summer visiting relatives and friends in England 
and Scotland. She was in Edinburgh for the first week of the Festival, and 
attended four concerts, the Sadler's Wells Ballet, and the Military Tattoo 
at the Castle. 

Miss Hancock was in London for six weeks at the summer session of the 
University of London. The course included lectures each morning covering 
some phase of the subject "Art, Literature and Music in England in the 
Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries." She also attended a tutorial in 
Architecture. Each afternoon trips were arranged which were coordinated 
with the morning lectures. For example, after a lecture on Sir Christopher 
Wren they were taken through St. Paul's Cathedral by the surveyor of St. 
Paul's. They visited architectural monuments and works of art both in gal- 
leries and in private collections. In many cases this involved special permis- 
sions and visits to places not usually open to the public, such as St. James' 
Palace. The summer school was composed of an international group from 
nineteen different countries. She also spent three weeks on the continent and 
had a trip through the Lake District of England and a visit to Scotland for 
the Edinburgh Festival. 

Miss Wilkinson was in England this summer and visited with our 
travelers, as well as with Miss Dorothy Baker, Miss Pamela Tinker, and Miss 
Agnete Wulff. ,..., 



Bon Voyage to the Class of '54 

JL HE sixty-five Abbot graduates of 1 954 are entering college this 
fall. By the time you receive your Bulletin you will have been 
through an orientation period; you will have been initiated, and no 
doubt will be feeling quite at home whether on a small and inti- 
mate campus or in one of the largest colleges or universities. I hope, 
of course, and all your former teachers hope, that you will find 
your academic preparation more than adequate for the new de- 
mands. But quite as important, I hope that socially you will find 
that the preparation you have had will help you in the freedoms and 
the greater variety of this new life; that even the disciplines and re- 
strictions of your school years will have freed you to exercise wisely 
the choices that will be yours. The "philosophy" of the college 
authorities is that you are now adult enough to be guided by inner 
compunctions and motivated by self-established goals to act with 
judgment as mature and truly civilized human beings. 

Some of the influences you will encounter contending against 
such conduct will be a challenge, but I am sure if each of you can 
establish a pattern of life that will be determined by as much 
thought for your obligations and your self respect as for your free- 
dom and privileges, your college years will be most stimulating and 
successful. 

I need hardly add, for I think each of you knows it, that often 
my thoughts will turn to you with affection and high hopes. As a 
class you gave Abbot much that I am grateful for. As individuals 
each of you has her own gifts. May you each fulfill the promise of 
your years with us, and as your memory turns back, may you be 
strengthened by the realization of your goodly heritage. 



Yours with many good wishes, 



L.OX2S 



7 



Report of Graduates of 1954 





FOUR-YEAR 


COLLEGES 




Barnard 


Anna Hewlett 


Oberlin 


Rethel West 


Bates 


Patricia Emery 


Pembroke 


Maris Oamer 


Boston University 


Valjeanne Brodeur 


Radcliffe 


Lucy Garretson 


Bryn Mawr 


Leslie Burgiel 




Jacqueline Wei 




Betsy Hilgenberg 


University of Rochester Mary Woolverton 


Carnegie Tech 


Carole Cox 


Simmons 


Nancy Friel 


Colby College 


Suzanne Fraser 


Skidmore 


Nancy Donnelly 


Connecticut 


Doris Niemand 
Frances Nolde 




Beverly Gramkow 
Margaret Moore 




Molly Young 


Smith 


Lucy Lippard 


Denison 


Harriet Moore 




Joan Wheeler 




Mary Weir 


Sweet Briar 


Holly Dunn 


Hollins 


Nancy-Jean Smith 


Vassar 


Jane Church 


Hood 


Patricia Bennett 




Ann Hunt 
Margaret Johnson 


Jackson 


Deborah Huckins 




Winifred Johnson 


Middlebury 


Martha Belknap 




Sally Jones 
Jane Miller 


McGill University 


Lucy Morley 




Audrey Synnott 


Mount Holyoke 


Audrey Davis 




Edith Williamson 




Margaretta Furst 


Wellesley 


Betsy Cooper 




Gretchen Kase 




Mary-Louise de Cholnoky 




Karen Keating 




Mary Louise Duffy 




Judith Prior 




Ann Norwood 




Janet Richardson 




Paula Prial 




Patricia Sanborn 




Vicky Schwab 




Patricia Skillin 




Sylvia Thayer 


Northwestern 


Linda Jones 


Wheaton 


Marion Badoian 




Suzanne Kent 




Cornelia St. John 




TWO-YEAR 


COLLEGES 




Bennett 


Leslie Carroll 


Centenary 


Betsy Harman 




Gail Husted 


Mount Vernon 


Mimi Ludlow 


Briarcliff 


Diane Cookman 


Colby Junior 


Sandra Liberty 


Bradford 


Sarah Harrington 
Suzanne Larter 







SCHOOL OF SPECIALIZED TRAINING 

Garland Jane Munro 



The gift of the class of 1954 was $700 for the Gymnasium Fund 



IO 



Piail&b (li+Kfiwf . . . Jten&i to- fyau 

Elizabeth Bradley '50 — Dawes Prize at Smith for Excellence in Political 

Science. B.A. degree, Summa Cum Laude — Smith College. 
Constance Corey Lashbrook '50— B.A. degree, Cum Laude— Wheaton 

College. 
Mary Grant '53 — Sophomore Representative to The Judicial Board — 

Smith College. 
Susan Kimball '51 — Varsity Field Hockey Team — Vassar College. 
Caroline Kimberly '50 — Dean's List — Pembroke College. 
Elizabeth Moss '50 — Borden Scholarship Award — University of Georgia 

(Award given for highest grades in Junior year) 
Anne Oliver '53 — Sophomore Representative to the Student Council — 

Smith College. 
Anne Sanborn '52 — Sophomore Honors — Mount Holyoke College. 
Doris Schoonmaker '53 — Secretary-Treasurer of Sophomore Class — 

Smith College. 
Ruth Sidon '53 — Treasurer of Student Body — Peace College. 
Jo Anne Smith '51 — Dean's List — Middlebury College. 
Sandra V. Smith '52 — Dean's List — Colby Junior College. 
Shirley Young '51— Phi Beta Kappa— Wellesley College. 



REPORT OF THE ABBOT SECOND CENTURY 

ALUMNAE FUND 

Gymnasium $6199 

Scholarship $1129 

Total Contributions to Gymnasium Fund 

From Alumnae, Parents and Other Friends 
$83,258.44 

Abbot Still Needs 

$216,741 .56 

Send Your Gift Now 



11 



Alumnae Area Chairmen for the George 
E. Abbot Memorial Gymnasium Fund 



Geographical Areas 

Arkansas, Louisiana and Mississippi 
California, northern 
California, southern 
Colorado and Utah 

Connecticut 
Darien area 
Bridgeport area 
Hartford area 
Litchfield County area 
New Canaan area 
New Haven area 
New London area 
Waterbury-New Britain area 

Florida 

Miami area 

St. Petersburg area 

Winter Park area 
Georgia 
Kansas 
Kentucky 

Maine 

Southeastern area 

Waterville area 
Maryland 

Baltimore area 

Chevy Chase and Washington, D. 

Massachusetts 
Andover 

Arlington-Belmont 
Beverly area 
Boston 

Deerfield-Greenfield area 
Fall River area 
Fitchburg area 
Jamaica Plain area 
Lawrence area 
Lexington area 
Marblehead area 
Marlboro area 
Melrose area 
Mt. Holyoke College 
Newburyport area 
Newton 
North Andover 
Plymouth area 
Springfield area 
Wakefield area 
Wellesley area 



Alumnae serving as Area Chairmen 
Mary Naff Pugh (Mrs. John H.) '40 
Frances Wright Kimball (Mrs. F. W.) '09 
Margaret C. Wilkins '13 
Josephine Hartwell Boddington (Mrs. William E.) 

Marcia Rudd Keil (Mrs. Carl) '31 

Metta Bettels Smith (Mrs. Roland F. W.) '31 

Julie Sherman Tibbetts (Mrs. Howard) '18 

Louise Robinson '20 

Rosamond Castle Olivetti (Mrs. Dino) '30 

Ruth Allen Healy (Mrs. Kent F.) '18 

Ruth W. Newcomb ' 1 o 

Phyllis England Letts (Mrs. Malcolm) '38 

Jane Edwards Holbrook (Mrs. Eugene) '52 
Frances Chandler Futch (Mrs. Wm.) '40 
Jessie McCreery Reed (Mrs. Philip) '41 

Alicia Cooper Wright (Mrs. Barry, Jr.) '48 
Theodora Manning Alexander (Mrs. Herbert M.) 
Jessamine Patton Kennedy (Mrs. George D.) '45 

Emma Holt Garside (Mrs. Thomas H.) '14 
Margaret O'Leary White (Mrs. John) '31 

Norma Forsyth Williams (Mrs. Sears) '38 
C. Virginia Spear Houghton (Mrs. Joseph) '26 

Helen Cutler Appleton (Mrs. Lyman) '32 
Ethel Rogers Foster (Mrs. Frank) '33 
Joyce Yoffa Rudolph (Mrs. Robert) '43 
Constance Parker Chipman (Mrs. Reeve) '06 
Millicent Smith Uppvall (Mrs. Bertil) '29 
Maud W. Sprague '06 
Beatrice Lane Mercer (Mrs. John C.) '28 
Velma Rowell Cutler (Mrs. George) '18 
Katherine G. Hamblet '20 
Carolyn Guptill Hansen (Mrs. Harry) '33 
Barbara Bloomfield Wood (Mrs. Arnold) '26 
Helen Rice Wiles (Mrs. F. Lawson) '33 
Polly Francis Loesch (Mrs. Russell) '29 
Anne L. Sanborn '52 
Louise Bacon Fuller (Mrs. Francis) '18 
Polly Spear Chapin (Mrs. Walter) '36 
Phyllis Saunders Simpson (Mrs. Davis) '38 
Elizabeth Taylor Amazeen (Mrs. Edward) '29 
Frances McTernan Coan (Mrs. Prescott) '35 
Ruth Deadman McLennan (Mrs. Allan) '26 
Lois Hardy Daloz (Mrs. Laurent) '29 



■41 



42 



12 



Wellesley College 
Westford- Lowell area 
Winchester area 
Wheaton College 
Worcester area 

Michigan 

Birmingham area 

Flint area 

Grand Rapids area 
Minnesota and North Dakota 

Missouri 

Kansas City area 

Nebraska 

New Hampshire 

Dover area 

Laconia area 

Manchester area 

New Jersey 

Montclair area 

Summit area 
New Mexico 

New York 

Albany area 

Amsterdam area 

Bronxville-Yonkers area 

Long Island area 

Mamaroneck area 

New York City area 

Rochester area 

Syracuse area 

Vassar College 
North and South Carolina 

Ohio 

Cincinnati area 
Youngstown area 

Oklahoma 

Pennsylvania 

Harrisburg area 

Philadelphia area 

Pittsburgh area 

Rhode Island 
Newport area 
Providence 

Texas 

Dallas area 
Vermont 

Brattleboro area 

Virginia 

Arlington area 

Charlottesville area 

Richmond area 
Washington 
Wisconsin 



Barbara Gibson '51 

Harriet Bolton Allen (Mrs. E. Kent) '32 

Virginia Gay d'Elseaux (Mrs. Frank) '28 

Betsy Aldrich '52 

Edith Ninomiya Hopkins (Mrs. A. Ryce) '42 

Jean Craig Fitzgerald (Mrs. Howard, 2nd) '43 
Barbara Ball Bacon (Mrs. Donald) '45 
Martha Ball Geiken (Mrs. H. Jack) '48 
Elizabeth Murphy Garrison (Mrs. Herbert) '35 

Frances Howard O'Brien (Mrs. James) '25 
Cornelia Crittenden '13 

Dorothy Higgins Rand (Mrs. Norman E.) '16 
Priscilla Russ Shannon (Mrs. John) '40 
Sarah T. Knox '09 

Mary Burton Blakney (Mrs. Peter J.) '46 
Barbara Reinhart Livingston (Mrs. DeWitt) '36 
Edda Renouf Gould (Mrs. R. Gordon) '26 

Katherine Kinney Hecox (Mrs. John) '20 

Dorothy G. Niles '16 

Nini Owsley Warwick (Mrs. Jack) '30 

Ruth Cann Baker (Mrs. Seward) '31 

Barbara Lord Mathias (Mrs. James) '30 

Anne Oakman Deegan (Mrs. Frank) '39 

Margaret Black Dintruff (Mrs. Richard) '49 

Anne Simpson White (Mrs. John) '38 

Caroline W. Benedict '53 

Roberta Kendall Kennedy (Mrs. Rolfe) '29 

Elizabeth Rich Ferguson (Mrs. James) '44 
E. B. Ogden Tod (Mrs. David) '48 
Virginia L. Eason '47 

Sarah Finch Hartwell (Mrs. Arthur) '23 
Mabel Levering Chestnut (Mrs. Henry) '29 
Louise Leslie Oxenham (Mrs. Alfred) '42 

Gertrude Campion Soutar (Mrs. James H.) '29 
Charlotte Eaton '16 

Elizabeth McBride Chapman (Mrs. Jack) '38 

Lloyd Pierce Smith (Mrs. Malcolm, Jr.) '39 

Joy Kolins Peisch (Mrs. Daniel) '47 
Julia Nelson Williams (Mrs. Edward) '41 
Mary Anna Howell '08 
Patricia Goss Rhodes (Mrs. James) '39 
Sally Stilson Athan (Mrs. Richard) '50 



*3 



The Parents Committee of the 
Gymnasium Fund 

E. Benjamin Redfield, Jr., Chairman 
Swampscott, Massachusetts 

Mr. and Mrs. Hanson W. Baldwin Mr. and Mrs. Duncan Merriwether 

Chappaqua, New York Chester Springs, Pennsylvania 

Mr. and Mrs. Leroy F. Ball Mr. and Mrs. Fletcher E. Nyce 

Flint, Michigan Cincinnati, Ohio 

Mr. and Mrs. Gardner G. Emmons Mr. and Mrs. Grant Oliver 

Concord, New Hampshire New Canaan, Connecticut 

Mr. and Mrs. Burton S. Flagg Mr. and Mrs. Everett H. Parker 

Andover, Massachusetts Denver, Colorado 

Mr. and Mrs. Adlai S. Hardin Mr. and Mrs. George F. Sawyer 

Darien, Connecticut Andover, Massachusetts 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Benton Harrison Mr. and Mrs. Elwood H. Schneider 

Manhasset, L. I., New York Kalamazoo, Michigan 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard G. Holbrook Mr. Edward C. Schroedel 

Bedford, New York Hartsdale, New York 

Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Holden Mr. and Mrs. Donald B. Smith 

Portland, Maine Boston, Massachusetts 

Mr. and Mrs. Buckley Hubbard Mr. and Mrs. Mortimer Smith 

North Girard, Pennsylvania Sandy Hook, Connecticut 

Mr. and Mrs. William R. Jackson Mr. and Mrs. Stoddard M. Stevens, Jr. 

Sewickley, Pennsylvania Short Hills, New Jersey 

Mr. and Mrs. George W. Johnson Mr. and Mrs. Ward K. Stilson 

Orlando, Florida Anderson, Indiana 

Mr. and Mrs. Allen Northey Jones Mr. and Mrs. George S. Tatman 

Newtown, Connecticut Connersville, Indiana 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles M. Kase Mr. and Mrs. Tseh-Hwen Wei 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin Bronxville, New York 

Dr. and Mrs. Francis M. Massie Mr. and Mrs. Leon H. Young, Jr. 

Lexington, Kentucky Amsterdam, New York 

DUPLICATE PLEDGE FOR ALUMNAE FUND 

(for your convenience if you have misplaced the original) 

I agree to contribute $ to the Abbot Second Century Alumnae Fund. 

Please check. 

□ I would like my entire contribution credited to the George E. Abbot Memorial Gymnasium. 

□ I would like my entire contribution credited to the Alumnae Scholarship Fund. 

Q I would like $ to be used for Alumnae Scholarships and $ for the 

Gymnasium Fund. 

□ My check is enclosed herewith. 
My payments will be in the following installments: 



i954> $ i955> $ 

(month) (month) 

Maiden name Class 

Married name 

Address 

Please make checks payable to the ABBOT SECOND CENTURY ALUMNAE FUND. 

Your gift is deductible for Federal Tax purposes. 

14 



iln iEemoriam 



1880 

Harriet Young Smith (Mrs. Edmund M. 
Wilcox) died suddenly August 12, 1954, in 
Rocky Hill, Conn. She was in her ninety- 
sixth year. Our sympathy is extended to her 
two daughters. 

1884 

Margaret Leslie (Mrs. Frank M. Kendall) 
died Aug. 8, 1954, at her home in Mont- 
pelier, Vermont. She was 90 years of age. 

1887 

Lillian Cutter (Mrs. L. C. Porter) died 
June 10, 1954, in Brookline, Mass. 

Ida Jones (Mrs. Arthur E. Barter) died 
September 10, 1954, in Roslindale, Mass. 

1889 

Lilian Johnson Welch (Mrs. Harry W. 
Tucker) died Oct. 29, 1953, in Bath, Maine. 

1894 

Roseanna T. Kelley (Mrs. A. Chandler 



Manning) died July 21, 1954, in Wilming- 
ton, Mass. 

Ethelyn Louise Marshall (Mrs. Allen E. 
Cross) died in Manchester, N. H., Sept. 2, 

!952- 

1899 

Sarah Sargent Little (Mrs. Ralph W. 
Hammond) died Jan. 9, 1953, in Merrimac, 
Mass. 

1902 

Mildred Chase (Mrs. J. Frank Drake) 
died August 10, 1954, in Hyannis, Mass. 
Our sincere sympathy is extended to her 
husband and to her four children. 

1904 

Marion Williams Cooper died September 
7, 1954, in Howe, Indiana. 

1911 

Margaret H. Baker died July 20, 1954, in 
Newton ville, Mass. Our sincere sympathy is 
extended to her sister, Barbara, Abbot 1922. 



Class News 



1879 

Abbie P. Rice Snowden's daughter has 
written that her mother was 95 years old 
last Christmas, and that up until that time 
she was very active. We are sorry to hear 
that since the middle of January Mrs. Snow- 
den has been confined to bed. 

1887 

Our oldest classmate, Sophia Walker 
Piper, had a birthday on August 7th. Now 
she is ninety and loyal to Abbot. She used to 
play "Greenville" on the piano when un- 
usual things happened. She lives in a Nurs- 
ing Home in Holliston, Mass. not far from 
the home of her son, Sam, and wife, her 
grandchildren and one great-granddaughter. 

Harriet Thwing is a close second in age 
and hopes when her January birthday is 
here that she will be walking without her 
cane. Jeannie Jillson no longer needs a cane 



when working in her garden in Claremont, 
California. These two "girls" had fractured 
bones in 1953 and have already taken up 
their usual duties and pleasures. 

Added sorrow has come to our Angie 
Dunton Purrington in the death of her only 
son, Harold, on July 1 9th, 1 954. A lung opera- 
tion did not give the relief that the surgeons 
expected. It takes all her faith and courage 
and strength to bear this loss, coming so 
soon after the death of her daughter Hilda 
on December 2nd, 1953. The surgeons 
could not remove a brain tumor. Angie is 
now with daughter Doris, the teacher and 
librarian, in Shelbyville, Ky. 

For the first time in 67 years the class 
letters do not include one from Jeanie 
Carter Prall. She was the Queen of letter 
writers. We remember the cheer and courage 
of those letters. 

We Four of '87 regret that we were not 



l 5 



represented at Abbot's 125th Anniversary. 
Miss Hearsey's address, as published in the 
May Bulletin, recalls some of the happen- 
ings of our day. We were the last class to 
spend our Senior year in Smith Hall on its 
original foundations. 

These class notes were contributed by 
Harriet H. Thwing, the president and secre- 
tary of the class of 1887. 

1889 

The following poem written by Flora 
Mason appeared in the Boston Herald re- 
cently. 

WHY BECUZ? 
I wonder why the word "because" 

So often is pronounced "becuz." 
The Red Cross is a noble cause, 

It never is pronounced a cuz. 

A fine performance wins applause, 

And no one ever says appluz; 
A useful fabric's name is gauze. 

Does anybody call it guz? 

'Twixt dark and daylight comes a pause, 
"The Children's Hour," not known as puz, 

And do you think old Santa Claus 
Would answer to the name of Cluz? 

Or would a boy whose name was Claude 
Be pleased if he were hailed as Clud? 

I'm very sure girls christened Maude 
Would never say their name was Mud. 

1892 

Alice Fleek Miller was the first secretary 
of the Newark (Ohio) chapter of the Red 
Cross and received a lapel pin at the annual 
meeting this year in recognition of her ser- 
vice. 

1894 

The following poem by Grace Norton 
Macrum appeared recently in the Boston 
Herald. 

"The handkerchiefs are in the drawer — 
Yes, that is what top drawers are for; 
Your shirts lie straight here in the press, 
Come now, with your quaint crookedness! 

How good it is that you have me 
To lay things out symmetrically — 
How wonderful that I have you 
To come and put them all askew!" 



1897 

The class extends its sympathy to Lillian 
Miller Troutman whose husband died Sept. 
4, in Butler, Pa. 

1900 

In the death of Winona K. Algie, 1900 has 
lost a loyal and loving classmate, and Abbot 
a loving daughter. We remember Winona in 
school as quiet and dreamy, but an able 
scholar, and she became well known in the 
educational world, being headmistress of the 
Charles River School in Dover, Mass. She 
served Abbot as alumnae trustee and gave 
generously of her time and experience. At 
our 50th reunion the class flowers which she 
brought and the photographs of days in 
school and a copy of our Class Book, the first 
one ever printed, added greatly to our en- 
joyment. Not long after her retirement from 
teaching, ill health curtailed her activities 
and after a long illness she entered "the 
more abundant life" on February 13, 1954. 

G.C.S. 

Mary Carleton has retired from her busi- 
ness life, and lives at the Fifth Avenue Hotel 
in New York. 

Grace Chapman Spear's oldest grand- 
daughter, Grace-Ann Jones, entered Vassar 
this fall. 

Leslie Crawford Hun had the misfortune 
of badly breaking her right wrist. While it 
complicated her life for some time, she is 
making a complete recovery. 

Constance Gutterson Taylor now makes her 
home in Santa Barbara, Calif. She is still 
teaching and is happy in her work. Her son 
and grandson live near her. 

Carrie Harmon Shaw's daughter, Betty, 
has a shop in Cape Elizabeth, Maine, 
which features sport clothes and accessories. 

Mary Morgan Norwood has retired from 
the Federal Reserve Bank in Baltimore 
where she was employed many years, and 
has an apartment in Baltimore with a friend. 

Cornelia Pickard Sanborn has been visiting 
in the East this summer with her family and 
friends. 

To Winifred Todd Mills the class extends 
its heartfelt sympathy on the death of her 
mother, Mrs. Todd, Abbot '87. Mrs. Todd 
lived in St. Stephen, New Brunswick, and 
was greatly beloved and widely known from 
her active part in public life over a long 
period when her husband was lieutenant 
governor of New Brunswick. 



16 



' Winifred stopped in Boston last spring on a 
return trip from Bermuda. She lunched with 
Grace Chapman Spear, and they spent an 
enjoyable afternoon in reminiscence of Ab- 
bot days. 

Alice Wood Hodgdon represented 1900 
at a meeting of the Eastern Maine Abbot 
Club in July. As in former seasons Alice has 
been active in the Boothbay Harbor Garden 
Club. 

The class notes were contributed by 
Grace Chapman Spear. 

1903 

Margaret Wilson Gerber announces the 
birth of her first granddaughter on April 5. 

1904 

The class extends its sincere sympathy to 
Mary Davis Lee whose oldest son, William, 
died this summer. 

1909 

Mary Bourne Boutell writes that she has 
one grandchild, a boy, the son of her 
daughter, Mary. 

Frances Wright Kimball writes, "I have 8 
grandchildren ranging from baby to 15 
years, so my interests are elastic and diversi- 
fied. I have had wonderfully good health all 
these years, and still play tennis, bowl, swim, 
and live out-of-doors." 

1911 

Dorothy Bigelow Arms has just returned 
from a tour of Europe. 

Miriam Howard Bushnell is on the na- 
tional board of the Campfire Girls, and has 
written radio scripts for them. 

Corinne Willard Dresser has a grand- 
daughter, Cynthia Ann. She was born June 
2, and is the daughter of Corinne's son, Wil- 
lard. 

1913 

Gladys Estabrook Blanchard's husband 
retired October 1, and they are living in 
Ormond Beach, Florida, right on the Hali- 
fax River. 

1914 

Louise Allaman Austin sported a Grand- 
mother's bracelet at the class luncheon in 
June showing names and dates of 7 grand- 
children. Two sons and one daughter are 
married. The daughter's name is now Mrs. 
Cash and the names on the bracelet began 



Penny, then Nicky — what happened beyond 
that with those names for dimes, quarters 
and halves, we were unable to discover in 
the din of women's voices! 

Harriet Bowman Meeker wrote a delightful 
letter to the class for our Reunion. She 
urged us to have pictures taken without hats 
as "they date us and those who stay at home 
can't see what we really look like." However, 
by this time you will have seen such pictures 
as were taken — we had a deluge of rain and 
lived in raincoats, rubbers and umbrellas 
scurrying in and out all the time. 

Rosamond Gens Lehnert also wrote a 
letter and poem for our reunion. 

Elsie Gleason Sloan (still able to get into a 
size 15) represented a 1914 graduate in the 
costume parade on Abbot's Birthday. She 
wore Helen Hamblet's graduation dress of 
lovely white embroidered voile and carried 
the traditional red rose and old-fashioned 
diploma. 

Helen Hamblet Dyer's son, Sam, was mar- 
ried in 1953. Her other two sons are still at 
home with her and right next door lives her 
father who at 87 is still active and shares 
their old home with Katharine Hamblet 
(1920). Marion (who passed away in July 
1953) is survived by a wonderful husband 
and family of three children. The oldest is a 
boy who at reunion time was about to be 
graduated from Swarthmore and all the 
Hamblets were going to his Commencement. 
He has proved an outstanding student and is 
the recipient of a Fulbright Fellowship for 
the coming year for study in Europe. 

Mary Hildreth was still in Florida at the 
time of our 40th Reunion. The class ex- 
tends its sympathy to Mary on learning at 
this late date that her mother passed away 
at the age of 92 in September 1952. 

Emma Holt Garside returned to the 40th 
Reunion from Saco, Maine, almost her 
first visit since she was obliged by serious 
illness to leave us at the very beginning of our 
senior year. Emma has two children and 
four grandsons. 

We didn't receive word directly from 
Jessie Lumsden Sherrard who has not been in 
good health but we read recently that Mr. 
Sherrard has been appointed chairman of 
the Finance Committee of the Boston Coun- 
cil of Boy Scouts. We love to report the civic 
interests of 1914's husbands! 

Katharine Selden MacDuffie was eagerly 
anticipating joining the ranks of our grand- 



17 



mothers "come Tuesday". We are happy to 
report K's news that a daughter was born 
on May n, Elizabeth Wiggin, to Dr. and 
Mrs. Frederic C. McDuffie of Boston. 

A third son was born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Douglas M. Getchell on February 23, 1954, 
bringing the total of Ella Stohn Getchell's 
grandchildren to 9 — 6 boys and 3 girls. 

Marie Winsor Appleby's children followed 
in the same order as those of Louise — two 
daughters and two sons. Three of her chil- 
dren are also married and Marie has five 
grandchildren. 

Margaret Wylie Ware came East about 
April 15th to visit her son and his family 
stationed at Westover AF Base, near Chico- 
pee Falls, Mass., with the intention of at- 
tending our Reunion. However, Jack re- 
ceived order for combat service in the Far 
Pacific and Peg was unable to join us. She 
returned West stopping for a visit in Ohio 
with her aunt and planned to return to 
California with Jack's wife and two daugh- 
ters sometime during the summer. Harriet 
Bowman Meeker who has a farm in Ohio 
planned to get over there and have a re- 
union with Peg and Louise Allaman this 
summer. 

1915 

Muriel Baker Wood reports the birth of her 
second grandson, Christopher John. Muriel 
is working for Arnold Tours in Boston. 

1916 

Vera Allen is listed in CatteWs Biographical 
Director of Leaders in American Education. Vera 
wrote and illustrated a textbook for pupils 
and teachers which has been translated into 
Tamil, one of the languages of India. 

Marjorie Freeman Heck was in Florence, 
Italy, during the spring. 

Louise Kimball Jenkins writes that her 
daughter is studying for an M.A. in theater 
directing at Carnegie Tech. She directed a 
musical show there last spring. 

Frances Moses Schubert's youngest son, 
who is 1 7, won one of the six four-year 
engineering scholarships for Lehigh. 

Dorothy Pillsbury Bartlett is hostess at the 
Maryland State House in Annapolis. 

1917 

Miriam Bacon Chellis's daughter, Carolyn, 
is engaged to Lt. Richard L. Dennis of 
Topeka, Kan. 



Helen Cutting is an assistant professor of 
Spanish at Woman's College of the Univer- 
sity of North Carolina. She taught at sum- 
mer school this year. 

1918 

Elizabeth Moore Hood writes that she has 
three grandchildren who are the children of 
her oldest daughter. Elizabeth's son, Earle, 
graduated from the University of Nevada, 
and is with the Woolworth Co. in San Fran- 
cisco. Her son, Arthur J. Ill, is a sophomore 
at Stanford, and her daughter, Eunice, is a 
freshman at Mills College. 

1919 

Grace Kepner Noble writes that she is re- 
covering from a bout with sciatica caused by 
a ruptured disc. Her third daughter, Caro- 
lyn, was married a year ago, and is doing 
social work while her husband attends Yale 
Divinity School. Grace reports that she has 
two grandchildren. 

1921 

The class extends its sympathy to Eliza- 
beth Weld Bennett whose husband died 
May 9, in Hingham. 

1923 

Elizabeth Flagg Dow's daughter, Eliza- 
beth, was married to 2nd Lt. Robert Lown, 
June 7, 1954. 

1924 

The class extends its sincere sympathy to 
Peggy MacDonald Vester whose husband 
died suddenly of heart trouble, June 19, 

1954- 

1925 

Marion Quain Kaiser is studying for her 
M.A. in Social Science at the San Jose 
State College. Her son is in Germany with 
the Army. 

Mary Righter Farrar writes that she had 
three graduations in her family this year. 
Her son, William, graduated from Washing- 
ton and Lee University, her daughter, 
Mary, Abbot '48, from George Washington 
University, and her daughter, Nancy, Abbot 
'51, from the Katharine Gibbs School. 

1926 

Barbara Bloomfield Wood was the winner 
of the Leonard Munn Fowle Trophy for her 



18 



outstanding performance during Marble- 
head Race Week. She is the first woman to 
be awarded this trophy. 

Anstiss Bowser Wagner and her husband 
are interested in photography. They spent a 
week at the experimental station at Baro, 
Colo., under the auspices of the Smithsonian 
Institute, taking pictures for the Arnold 
Arboretum in Boston. 

1927 

Shirley Fowler Otto writes that her 
daughter, Adrienne, was married Aug. 28, 
1954, to F. Benjamin Carr of Worcester. 

June Hinman Marques writes that her 
husband is a Marine Engineer, and that she 
has three sons, Paul, 8, John, 11, and Roy, 
17. June is president of the P.T.A. in the 
elementary school in Weehawken. She has 
been doing substitute teaching in the High 
School for the past two years. 

1929 

Reunion Report 

The twenty- fifth reunion of the class of '29 
and affiliate friends brought back twenty-one 
"girls" to celebrate Abbot's 125th Birth- 
day. Telegrams, pictures and messages from 
nineteen others brought them back in 
thought. We hope that before the next bulle- 
tin comes out that we will have heard from 
the other eighteen classmembers who were 
unable to write in June. Louise Tobey Dean 
wrote a very interesting letter, filled with 
tid-bits of remembrances and even the 
graduation speech her father had given 
while he was the governor of New Hamp- 
shire. She and her husband are interested in 
the Lincoln Treatment in California. Polly 
Warden Schwenninger sent a letter of her ex- 
periences during the war and a copy of the 
book "Morocco" which she had translated 
from the French to be given to the library. 

What a busy day it was trying to see every- 
one in the rainstorm! Luncheon at Levag- 
gi's was the focal point and a meeting had 
been planned until the weather sent every- 
one under cover of the Birthday Bazaar. 
Those who had arrived on Friday night 
had a real gabfest. Chatter of careers, hus- 
band's vocations, travels and anecdotes of 
fond children and pets filled the air. The 
teen aged daughters of Lois Hardy Daloz 
and "Duffy" Newcomb Rogers flipped back 
the pages of our memory to a mirror of our- 
selves. Fran Cobb Russell had just seen our 




Barbara Elliot Tevepaugh '29, her husband 
and daughter, Jean 



class baby off for overseas duty and made us 
proud of her as she entered the business 
field with a sauce for ham. But the only 
ham in evidence was the dramatic variety 
as representatives of the style eras paraded 
the atrocities of the twenties and thirties. 

Betty Taylor Amazeen and Polly Frances 
Loesch wore the inimitable flapper fashions 
while at the modern dress shop belonging 
to Ruth Shulze Hammond, Katherine 
Kennedy Beardsley and Martha Tuttle Haigis 
modeled the more attractive styles of 1954 
at an impromptu fashion revue. Millie 
Smith Uppvall had driven down from the 
activities at Deerfield Academy and col- 
laborated with Bettina Rollins Wheeler on 
the clever verse for the May Bulletin. Evi- 
dences of Peg Neville Batchelder's skill with 
fabrics were seen in the fluttering green 
pennants which decorated the table while 
Catherine McDonnell kept a watchful eye 
out for any in need of transportation. The 
newly elected class fund secretary, Lois 
Daloz, announced the class gift to the 
gymnasium building fund. Her work will 
be made joyful by the ioo°/ response of class 
members with individual gifts to this very 
much needed building. Grace Stephens 
made a charming picture at one end of the 



19 




Kay Bowden Barnes '29 and her family 



table chatting with the twosome, Estelle 
Levering Chestnut and Jane Linn Gale while 
Jean Stewart and Rosamond Wheeler en- 
joyed a tete-a-tete on public relations. Roz 
is society editor for the Boston Traveler and 
has been a popular speaker at the Boston 
Abbot Club. Chatting gayly to other class- 
mates was Cleone Place Tiffany, as pert as an 
ad from Mademoiselle. And so it was with all. 
A few changes here and there — a pound 
more or less- — a few silvered locks — but a 
very welcome sight to see — fair '29. Among 
those who have attended almost all the 
reunions were Kay Blunt Polsby and Gert- 
rude Campion Soutar as well as Gay, Lois, 
Peg, Kay, Bettina and others but there were 
obviously many who were missed. The let- 
ters from Bobby Kendall Kennedy and Bar- 
bara Folk Howe reflected the keen disap- 
pointment that although they were to be 
in Boston in early June, May would be an 
impossibility. Both were in North Carolina 
where their husbands' business responsi- 
bilities had taken them. Barbara has been 
having a very interesting five years on the 
campuses of colleges and schools while her 
husband arranges the details of campaigns 
for special funds. From Bradford Junior 
College in Massachusetts to Raleigh, N. C. 
where they were located at Peace Junior 
College, with Drexel Institute or M.I.T., 
Barbara has found interests in choral groups, 
garden and antique clubs as well as Cerebral 
Palsy Centers. Trudie King Bedard writes of 
similar experiences as the wife of the Presi- 
dent of the Parsons School of Design in 
New York. While in California she met 



Gwen Jones Hamblin with her handsome 
husband and in Aspen, Colorado, at a de- 
signer's Institute she met Jane Linn Gale. 
A long letter from our class president, 
Louise Anthony Castor, our beloved Jo-Jo, 
relates that she too is leading a busy civic 
and business life while having fun raising 
cocker spaniels and chickens in a delightful 
rural community. 

Telegrams from "E.J." Osborne Bacon and 
Kay Bowden Barnes brought greetings. "E. 
J." was tripping the light fantastic as tap- 
dancer in the spring show as well as chaper- 
oning at the prom. No change there. Kay 
was recuperating from a minor operation 
but reported all was well. Illness in the 
family had prevented Alish Butler, Betty 
McKinny and Barbara Elliot Tevepaugh 
from coming although they were practically 
on their way. Joyce Jarman McNamara's 
only son had been seriously injured in two 
accidents, one at camp, the other in the 
science lab. We hope by now that he is com- 
pletely recovered. 

Eleanor Jones Bennett, whose son is off 
to college this fall, wrote that she was on her 
way to Denver to attend the National Con- 
vention of the League of Women Voters; she 
is president of the South Orange League in 
N. J. Betty Smiley is also politically in- 
clined. Since Charlotte Osgood Bennett's 
daughters are well on their way to their 
own professional careers of merchandising 
and nursing, she is Dietary Aid in the Over- 
look Hospital in Summit, New Jersey. Har- 
riet Gilmore Yoh was recuperating from an 
operation too but sent news of her life as 
librarian at Penn State and Cincinnati. 
Since the birth of her two girls her road has 
led through PTA, scouts, church, college 
clubs and hospital auxiliary. Sounds fa- 
miliar, doesn't it? She would appreciate 
hearing from any AA girl in southern New 
Jersey or in the vicinity of Philadelphia. 
Charlotte Butler Plummer's husband has 
just opened an office in Rosemont, Pa. and 
Olive Estey Weigle is somewhere in Penn- 
sylvania too. Hope you can get together. 
But you probably are miles apart! Grace 
Castle sent word from Chicago that she is 
doing statistical work for the American 
Bakers Association. 

From Baltimore we hear that Betty Hulse 
Freeman and Kay Barnes are wives of medi- 
cal men. Betty's husband is Chief of the 
Clinical Investigation Branch of the Army 



20 



Chemical Center as a civilian and a member 
of the faculty of the Department of Medicine 
at Johns Hopkins. Their three children at- 
tend the Friends School in Baltimore. Kay 
continues her professional interest as a 
medical social worker in the Maryland 
Children's Aid and Baltimore Children's 
Home. Her husband, Fred, also teaches at 
the Johns Hopkins Medical School and is 
engaged in research in the chemical as- 
pects of disease. 

Mail was returned from Kwei-Ju King in 
China, reminding us that there are still 
those who might like to correspond if they 
could but until communications are possible 
we can only wait and hope that all is well. 

Polly Francis Loesgh 
Reunion Chairman 

Polly Warden Schwenninger's letter: 

Dear Polly and All Twenty-Niners, 

Greetings to you and how I wish I might 
be there with you. Polly's letter was a de- 
light and I swore the Easter holidays would 
not go by without my sending you some kind 
of missive. 

So here goes . . . After my marriage I lived 
in Paris for a while where I had a grand 
time studying at the Institute of Art and 
Archaeology. Then we went to Nancy 
where my husband began working for Social 
Security. The war drove us from there as it 
was a forbidden zone and I had no desire to 
spend it in a concentration camp. Jean was 
appointed to Grenoble, a lucky choice be- 
cause it was also a fixed place of residence for 




Polly Warden Schwenninger '29 with Patty, 
Peter, and Jean 



Americans and Englishmen. They were 
pretty black years, blackest of all after I was 
cut off from home in 1942. But this city, 
which is the birthplace of the French Revo- 
lution, was immediately behind the allied 
cause to a man which meant a lot to me. 
That's when I began teaching. At the local 
University they were looking for people who 
were not pro- Vichy and pro-German to 
teach the students conversation. At first 
it was pretty frightful but I soon began to 
love it. With that for a start I soon began 
to have a lot of private lessons and now I 
teach in a private school where the children 
positively lap up anything and everything 
that has to do with the U. S. Several of my 
former students have been to America on 
scholarships — mostly to New England and 
now they all dream of going back as quickly 
as possible. Before the war, most of them 
went to England for practical experience 
but now, thanks to all the wonderful schol- 
arships, they all have their eyes turned 
towards home. 

The war years were grim in many ways, 
of course, we all starved and a potato was 
more valuable than a nugget of pure gold. 
We wore wooden-soled shoes and the most 
ungodly creations in the way of clothes but 
that wasn't the worst part of it by far. 
Several of our friends who were in the Re- 
sistance Movement were arrested, tortured 
and killed. The last winter of the war was a 
nightmare ■ — in December our daughter 
Patty's godfather and his father were killed 
the same night. For Fve forgotten to say 
that our bright light was our little daughter, 
Patty, born in 1941. It's a mystery to me 
how she survived with never an orange, an 
egg, meat, etc. It left her rather frail but 
now she's more than vigorous and as tall 
as I am at twelve. 

I wish I could make you feel the mad joy 
that occurred in Grenoble when the 
Americans delivered us in August, my per- 
sonal joy was short-lived for the Liberation 
meant news from mother for me and it was 
then that I learned of her death. 

We decided to settle down here. It's a 
wonderful place for children with the Alps, 
skiing, hiking on your very door step. Of 
course, the climate can be pretty harsh — for 
Easter we're having snow and a fine north 
wind — but I've never seen drifts and ice 
storms as in New England. 

In 1945 our first son Jean came along 



21 



and two years ago little Peter who is natural- 
ly the spoiled darling of the family. Patty 
goes to a private school and is already in 
the second year of Latin, English, Algebra 
and Geometry. I shouldn't believe it possible 
for a child of twelve to do such things if I 
didn't see it with my own eyes. Jean goes 
to the little country school here where he 
is busy learning the three R's. Patty wants 
to study English later and since the age of 
three Jean has steadily declared he wants 
to be the kind of doctor that cuts up people. 
Two years ago — thanks to the more than 
congested housing situation we were de- 
lighted to leave our flat in the city and 
move to Saint Martin. At the time it seemed 
a major tragedy to us but it's proved to 
be a blessing for the children's health. 
Saint Martin is a little village clinging to 
the side of a minor (for here) Alp. 
There are eighty-two steps between our 
gate and the front door!! My greatest prob- 
lem at first was learning to drive a French 
car in the two impressive hairpin turns you 
have to navigate to get here. I have friends 
who still prefer to leave their car down be- 
low and walk up. 

A few years ago I began translating books 
for a local publishing house and found I 
adored it. I'm sending you one I did on 
Morocco to give to the Abbot Library from 
the class of twenty-nine. There are some 
wonderful misprints in it but they are 
apparently inevitable with type-setters who 
don't know a word of English. I've just 
started to do one on Algeria. 

So you see my life is very busy. I dream of 
coming home for a visit but for the time 
being it's impossible with three small 
children. 

I'm sending a picture. I'd hoped to make 
a better one — but the weather won't per- 
mit. 

Do send me the newsletter — I'll positively 
devour it. And do tell all 20,ers who come 
this way to look me up and I'll show them 
an Alp or two." 

1931 

Agnes Sibbison Allen's thirteen-year-old 
son entered Loomis this fall. 

Louise Wallburg Kneeland writes that 
three of her children are in college. 

1932 

Mary Thompson Sherman's daughter, 
Nancy, 10, is in the 6th grade at the Lincoln 



School in Providence, and her son, Robert, 6, 
is in the first grade at Moses Brown. Mary 
has just retired as president of the Rhode 
Island Wellesley Club, and is on the execu- 
tive committee of the Moses Brown School. 

1933 

Married 
Margo Walker to Sidney B. Whittier, 
June 5, 1954. He is a designer-engineer at 
the Polaroid Corporation in Cambridge, 
Mass., and in the middle of July they left for 
a year's cruise in the Caribbean on his 
schooner. 

1936 

Phyllis Fisher Tobey has four children who 
range in age from 10 months to 10 years. 

Ann Robins Frank's husband is a geo- 
physicist for an oil exploration contractor. 
She writes, "After 1 1 years living in a trailer 
and moving every six weeks or so (some 80 
towns in 5 states) in the oil exploration 
business, we have finally moved to Houston 
to be here permanently. We have bought a 
house, and are busy settling down. It seems 
pleasant, but strange to put down roots in 




Bob, Margie, and Susie, children of Connie 
Smith Templeton '39 



22 



one spot." Ann has a son, John Frank, born 
in November, 1953. 

Elinor Robinson Goodwin has a son, Stu- 
art, who is two years old. 

Patricia Smith Magee's husband is with 
the General Electric Company. She has 3 
children, Mark, 9, Jonathan, 7, and Heidi, 5. 

1937 

Charlotte Boynton received an M.D. 
degree from the Medical College of Vir- 
ginia in June. She is now interning at the 
University Hospital, Madison, Wis., and 
then hopes to have two years of residency. 
She will then begin practice— probably in 
internal Medicine. 

Born 

To Louise Risley Stever, a fourth child and 
second son, Roy Risley, Aug. 17, 1954. 

1938 

Constance Abbott Schwab writes that her 
husband was recalled to active duty for 
eighteen months. He is a lieutenant com- 
mander, and is chief anaesthetist at the U. S. 
Naval Hospital in Portsmouth, Va. Connie 
has three children, George 3^, William, 2, 
and Marjorie, 10 months. 

The class extends its sympathy to Elise 
Duncan Boardman whose father died last 
December. 

Jean Tilton Melby has three sons aged 
43^> 7> an d 103^2. She is teaching Nursery 
School, and her husband has his own busi- 
ness as a manufacturer's agent. 

Born 

To Jean Cross Maier, a fourth child and 
third daughter, Jill Austin, Jan. 2, 1954. 
Jean's husband is now working in the U. S. 
Steel's new Fairless Works. 

To Dorothy Walworth Black, a second 
daughter, Mary Frances, Feb. 2, 1954. 

1939 

Mary Curtis performed at the grand 
opera air season in Milan and Trapani 
during the summer. 

1940 

Mary Ailing Gregg writes that she keeps 
busy with her four children, Bill, 5, Susan, 4, 
Martha, 2, and Johnny, 1 1 months. 

Nancy Harrison spent six weeks last spring 
visiting the British Isles and Paris. 

Margaret McFarlin is now working in the 




Frances Chandler Futch '40 and her daughter 



operating room at the hospital at Keesler 
Air Force Base in Biloxi, Miss. 

Doris Sawyer Hoar is still interested in the 
theater. She appeared with the Concord 
Players during the summer. Her daughter, 
Stephanie, 9, is making a mark as an 
equestrienne, and won a ribbon for jumping 
at the Millwood Horse Show. 

1941 

Elizabeth Hosford Wiggin and her hus- 
band run a restaurant in North Thetford 
each summer. 

Sue Long Wagner is now working and 
living in San Francisco. 

Helen B. Stott is serving on the Smith 
College faculty as assistant in Choral Music. 
Engaged 

Anne K. Selden to Alec Guild of Lara- 
mie, Wyoming. Mr. Guild is a native of 
Coventry, Warwickshire, England, and 
served seven years with the British Army 
during World War II. He is attending the 
University of Wisconsin. 

Married 

Beverly Brooks to Carl Frederick Floe, 
June 21, 1954, in Millboro, Va. 
Born 

To Miriam Colder Dunn, a second daugh- 
ter, Katherine Calder, Sept. 9, 1954. 

1942 

Jeanne Bowersox Wilson writes that her 
husband is studying at the University of 



23 



Delaware. She has two children, Susie, 3, 
and Kenny 1 ^. 

Bette Gorsuch White spent two months in 
Europe last summer. 

Betty Hardy Verdery's husband has been 
made district manager of the Boston district 
of the Kelly-Springfield Tire Co. They are 
now living in Sherborn, Mass. 
Married 

Jane Bishop to Dr. John Leslie Fahey, 
June 12, 1954, in New York City. 

1943 

Our sympathy is extended to Betsy 
Bennett Ewing whose father died in May. 

Born 
To Constance Walker Thompson, a second 
child and first daughter, Sara Anne, Feb. 4, 

*954- 

To Isabel Wiggin McDuffie, a daughter, 
Elisabeth Wiggin, May 11, 1954. 

1944 

Married 
Nancy E. Stone to Paul Franklin Hey- 
mann of Toledo, Ohio, July 3, 1954. Andree 
Luce was one of the bridesmaids. Mr. Hey- 
mann was graduated from Hotchkiss School 
and Yale University. He served overseas 
in the Naval Reserve and is treasurer of the 
Ohio Plate Glass Co. 

Born 

To Patricia Damon Niswander, a second 
daughter, Ann, Aug. 7, 1954. 

To Priscilla Stevens Rutherford, a fourth 
son, Edward Stevens, Aug. 5, 1954. 

1945 

Martha Boynton Pawle's husband is serving 
as first lieutenant in the Air Force Medical 
Corps at Lawson Air Base near Seattle. 
The whole family drove out together this 
summer. 

Betsy Brown Gordon's husband is doing 
research in the Public Health Service at 
Bethesda, Md. 

Jean Mulvey is assistant editor of outdoor 
books at the Macmillan Co. in New York. 

Jean Russell Keavy writes that she has 
two daughters. Her husband is a salesman 
for International Business Machines. 

Cynthia Smith McFall's daughter, Donna 
Ling, born Dec. 16, 1953, attended Abbot's 
125th Birthday last May with her mother. 



24 



Married 

Marjorie Milne to Manny Winston, Aug. 
29, 1954, in Manchester, N. H. 

Beatrice Van Cleve to John Kirk Lee, 
July 19, 1954, in Jamestown, N. Y. Mr. Lee 
is a graduate of Yale College and is with 
the Johnson and Johnson Co., New Bruns- 
wick, N. J. 

Born 

To Suzanne Leland LeFeber, a third child 
and second son, William Polk, May 1 1, 1954. 

To Ann Reagan Hafer, a daughter, Wendy 
Ann, March 9, 1954. 

1946 

Married 

Frances Gorham to Theodore Postma, 
Jr., Aug. 14, 1954, in Brunswick, Me. 
Born 

To Nancy Hellweg Warren, a son, David 
Porter, March 18, 1954. Nancy's husband is 
teaching mathematics at St. Johnsbury 
Academy in Vermont. 

To Sally North Jones a second son, 
Christopher North, Aug. 31, 1954. 

To Mavis Twomey Cox, a second child and 
first son, George, Jr., April 14, 1954. 

1947 

Edith Flather read a paper, Masses of 
Visual Binaries, at the meeting of the Ameri- 
can Astronomical Society. On the last day 
of her visit to Ann Arbor, an automobile 
accident put her in the hospital with a 
multiple fractured and dislocated pelvis. 
After seven weeks there and a month at 
home (to learn how to walk again) she is 
now back at Swarthmore. 

Christine Von Goeben Curtis writes that \ 
her husband was recalled into active duty 
with the Air Force in June, and is now in 
Korea. Chris is working in San Francisco 
until his return. 

Married 

Nancy Brumback to Mark M. Kruvand, 
June 9, 1953, in New York City. Mark is a 
Yale graduate and is with the Southwestern 
Industrial Electronics Co. in Houston, Texas. 
Nancy would love to see any Abbot girls in 
the area. 

Born 

To Ann Aulis Ronan, a daughter, Lisa 
Ann, Jan. 9, 1954. 

To Peggy Kimball Montgomery, a second ; 
child and first son, Robert Langford, 3rd, 
June 9, 1954. 



To Marion White Singleton, a second child 
and first son, Peter Collom, Aug. 10, 1954. 

1948 

Ann Bergh Hull-Ryde's husband was dis- 
charged from the Navy in September. 
Anne's daughter, Carolyn Anne, is now a 
year old. 

Mary Carroll Sinclaire Morris writes that 
her husband is with the First National Bank 
in Denver, Colo. 

Mary Farrar graduated from George 
Washington University in June. 

Bunny Zuckerman plans to become an 
elementary school teacher. She studied at 
New York University this summer. 
Engaged 

Fairfield Frank to Arthur Lambert Du- 
Bois of New Canaan, Conn. Mr. DuBois 
was graduated from the New Canaan 
Country School and Deerfield Academy. He 
is now attending Colgate University. 

Lisa Hawkins to Lt. Christopher May, 
U.S.N.R., of Rochester, N. Y. Lt. May was 
graduated from the Harley School in Roch- 
ester and from Harvard College. He is sta- 
tioned in Washington. 

Married 

Elizabeth Howe to Philip Bullard How- 
ard, July 24, 1954, in North Andover, Mass. 
Helen Tasche was one of the bridesmaids. 
Mr. Howard is a graduate of the University 
of Oklahoma and served as an officer with 
the Navy for three years. He is now studying 
at the Harvard School of Business Adminis- 
tration. 

Barbara Sugar to Dr. James Howard 
Connor, June 26, 1954. Mary Rich was one 
of the bridesmaids. 

Helen Taylor to Frank Potter Dodd of 
Middletown, Conn. May 15, 1954. Mary 
Taylor '45 was one of the bridesmaids. Mr. 
Dodd is an alumnus of Wesleyan University, 
and is field representative for Aetna Life 
Affiliated Companies in New Jersey. 
Born 

To Beverley Adkins Wells, a son, Eric 
Sanderson, Aug. 31, 1954. 

To Lee Booth Witwer, a second daughter, 
Sally, Aug. 16, 1954. 

To Nancy Elliot Stewart, a son, Thomas 
Elliot, Feb. 9, 1954. 

To Carolyn England Wansker, a daughter, 
Deborah Leigh, July 1 , 1 954. 

To Sally Hughes Carr, a second son, 
David Barton, May 7, 1954. 



1949 

Married 

Polly Anne Maddux to Ensign David 
Louis Harlow of New York, June 20, 1954, 
in Princeton, N. J. Ensign Harlow attended 
Manhattan College and the Coast Guard 
Academy in New London, Conn. He is in 
Navy Aviation at San Diego, Calif. 

Anne E. Miskell to Joseph E. Forand, 
July 31, 1954, in New Bedford. Mr. Forand 
attended Norwich University, and served 
two years as a lieutenant in the Army. 

Joan Webster to Alexander Commins 
Post, April 10, 1954. Carole Quigg was a 
bridesmaid. Mr. Post, a graduate of West- 
ern Reserve Academy and Williams College, 
is now serving in the Far East. 
Born 

To Margaret Black Dintruff, a second 
daughter, Alison Ann, April 3, 1954. 

To Anne Dartt Leverich, a son, Donald 
Smart, Aug. 21, 1954. 

1950 

Joan Aldrich received a B.A. from Conn- 
ecticut College in June. She majored in 
Mathematics. She spent six weeks in Europe 
last summer. She is working for the 
Travelers Insurance Company in Hartford 
as a member of the Group Field Service 
Training Program. 

Carol Bernstein Horowitz was graduated 
from Connecticut College in June. She and 
her husband are now living in Brockton, 
Mass. 

Libby Bradley graduated from Smith 
Summa Cum Laude. She majored in Govern- 
ment. She is studying this year at the Johns 
Hopkins School of International Studies in 
Washington. 

Jane Currier majored in Home Econo- 
mics at De Pauw. She received a B.A. degree 
in June. 

Cynthia Faigle received a B.S. degree 
from the School of Speech and Dramatic 
Art at Syracuse University last June. She 
spent the summer touring Europe. Cynthia 
is now working as a speech therapist in 
Somerville, N. J., working three days a week 
with Cerebral Palsy children and two days 
with public school children. 

Nancy Gray majored in Economics at 
Wellesley. She received an A.B. degree in 
June. She is now working in the investment 
analysis department of the Boston Safe De- 
posit and Trust Company. 



25 



Ann Higgins received a Bachelor of Arts 
degree from Wellesley and majored in 
Economics. She is now studying for her 
master's degree at the Radcliffe School of 
Management Training. 

Judy Holt received a B.A. degree from 
Smith in June, and majored in Art, both 
historical and practical. She spent the sum- 
mer bicycling through Germany. 

Toddy Huberth received a Bachelor of 
Arts degree from Colorado College in June, 
and majored in Sociology. She spent the 
summer in Europe, and is now attending the 
New York School of Social Work. 

Caroline Kimberly received a B.A. degree 
from Pembroke in June. 

Nora Johnson received a B.A. degree 
from Smith, majoring in American Studies 
(a combination of History, Government and 
English) . She is working on a novel for pub- 
lication. 

Peggy Lurton received a B.A. degree 
from Cornell in June. She majored in 
French Literature. 

Jane Pope received a B.A. degree from 
Middlebury with honors. She majored in 
English. She vacationed this summer in New 
Mexico. 

Debby Redfield graduated from the Nur- 
sery Training School in Boston in June. She 
is now head teacher in the Nursery School at 
Stephens College in Columbia, Mo. 

Alice Russell received a B.A. degree from 
Wheaton in June with an English major. 

Eva Sontum graduated from Middlebury 
in June with a B.A. degree. She majored in 
Biology and Chemistry. She plans to do 
medical or cancer research work in Denver, 
Colo. 

Engaged 

Mary Jane Greenwald to Peter Jakobson 
of New York. Mr. Jakobson is a graduate of 
New York University. 

Jane Russell to Christopher Stoneman. 
Mr. Stoneman is a graduate of Cambridge 
University, and has been teaching in this 
country for the past three years. 

Sally Westhaver to Richard Barron Kydd 
of Andover. Sally received a B.A. degree 
from Mount Holyoke in June. She is now 
working as research assistant at the Har- 
vard School of Public Health. 
Married 

Alison Carter to John Galvin Mitchell of 
Cincinnati. Mr. Mitchell was graduated 
from Portsmouth Priory School and Yale. 




Katherine Edwards, daughter of Beverley 
Flather Edwards '50 



Constance Corey to Lt. John Malcolm 
Lashbrook of Flushing, N. Y., Aug. 14, 1954, 
in Falmouth Foreside, Me. Connie received 
a B.A. degree from Wheaton in June cum 
laude, and majored in Psychology. She was I 
a member of the Children's School Staff of | 
the Vassar Summer Institute. Lt. Lash- 
brook is stationed at Ft. Eustis, Va. 

Margaret Aiken Doane to Richard Wor- 
cester Calvert, June 15, 1954, in Princeton, 
N.J. 

Jane Gafill to Reginald Finch Towner, 
Jr., June 26, 1954, in South Bend, Ind. Alice 
Russell was maid of honor, and Elizabeth 
Goodspeed was one of the bridesmaids. Mr. 
Towner was graduated from Governor 
Dummer Academy and Amherst College 
and is now serving in the Air Force as a sec- 
ond lieutenant. 

Virginia Ann Merriwether to Leslie 
Benjamin Disharoon, June 26, 1954. Julia 
Merriwether '53 was maid of honor. Ann 
graduated from Mount Holyoke in June 
with a B.A. degree. Mr. Disharoon received 
his B.A. degree in June and is now a candi- 
date for a master's degree in Business Ad- 
ministration at Columbia University. 

Nancy L. Shulze to Elliott S. Lamb of 
Andover, July 3, 1954. Barbara Shulze '48 



26 



was maid of honor, and Joan Barnard '51 
was one of the bridesmaids. Mr. Lamb at- 
tended the Peddie School and was graduated 
from Yale in 1954. 

Born 

To Dorothy Lampert Feigenbaum, a 
daughter, Susan Jan, Aug. 24, 1954. Doro- 
thy graduated from Radcliffe in June with 
a B.A. degree from the department of 
American History. 

To Sally Stevens MacMillan, a daughter, 
Sarah Marion, July 12, 1954. 

1951 

Joan Barnard is on the club council and 
the executive council at Goucher College. 

Nancy Farrar graduated from the Kath- 
arine Gibbs School in Montclair last June. 

Minola Habsburg was one of the members 
of royalty who cruised through the Aegean 
last summer as the guests of the king and 
queen of Greece. 

Mimi JNesbit has transferred to the School 
of Music at Northwestern. She is in the 
Glee Club, and sang one of the leads in the 
Northwestern opera production last spring. 
Mimi spent three months in Europe last 
summer. 

Polly Paradise is in training at the Hart- 
ford Hospital. 

Engaged 

Sarah Jane Mason to Howard Gardner 
Crowell, Jr., of Mattapoisett, Mass. Mr. 
Crowell is a graduate of St. George's School 
and St. Lawrence University. He is a lieu- 
tenant in the Army and is stationed at Ft. 
Benning, Ga. 

Rosamond Reifsnyder to Ens. James 
Knickerbocker Peck, Jr. of Scranton, Pa. 
Ens. Peck is a graduate of Tabor Academy 
and Wesleyan University. He is on leave 
from Cornell University Law School while 
serving in the Naval Reserve in the Medi- 
terranean. 

Married 

Edna Grieco to Thomas Jay Thomas of 
Melvin Village, N. H., Aug. 22, 1954. Mr. 
Thomas is a graduate of Brewster Academy 
and attended Piedmont College. He is an 
airman, second class, and is stationed at 
Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio, 
Tex. Gwendolyn Barrington was maid of 
honor at the wedding. 

Ruth Doane Randall to John Fairbanks 
Motsinger, Jr., June 9, 1954, in Orlando, 
Fla. 



Patricia Bull Smith to George Dorland 
Langdon, Jr., June 25, 1954, in Newtown, 
Conn. 

Mary Macy Wheeler to Ens. Gardner 
Dudley Shepard, July 31, 1954, in Welles- 
ley Hills. Mr. Shepard, a graduate of Phil- 
lips Andover, studied engineering at Yale 
University, and is an ensign in the Naval 
Reserve. 

Born 

To Ruth DeNoyelles Diefenbach, a son, 
Robert E., Dec. 18, 1953. 

1952 

Anisia Allen is spending the year in Paris 
with the Reid Hall group which is made up 
of Junior College graduates. She will stay at 
Reid Hall and have classes at the Sorbonne 
and Ecole du Louvre. Her address is Reid 
Hall, American Educational Center, 41 rue 
de Chevreuse, Paris, France. 

Rita De Rosa is a member of Chi Omega 
social fraternity and Phi Beta music and 
speech honorary society at Northwestern. 
She is secretary of Council at Northwestern 
Apartments and a representative to Associ- 
ated Women's Students. 

Connie Hamilton is spending her Junior 
year abroad with the Smith College group. 
She is studying at the University of Geneva. 

Dodo Hawes was student chairman of the 
Chamber Singers, a choral group from 
Smith, on their European tour last summer. 

Connie Markert graduated from Colby 
Junior College in June, and is now taking 
the Medical Records Course at Simmons 
College. 

Anne Sanborn spent one month in 
France last summer living with an adopted 
family and one month traveling through 
France. She was one of eleven Mount 
Holyoke girls accepted for the experiment in 
international living. 

Sandy Smith graduated from Colby 
Junior College in June. She is now studying 
at the Katharine Gibbs School in Boston. 

Joan Wall graduated from Katharine 
Gibbs School in New York, and is now tour- 
ing Europe. 

Betsy W'askowitz won an honorable men- 
tion for a self portrait done in pastels at the 
Medical Art Exhibition in Hartford. 

Engaged 
Nancy Penwell to William O. Hood of 
Andover. Mr. Hood, a graduate of New 



27 



Hampton School, is studying at the Babson 
Institute of Business Administration. 

Married 

Barbara Nichols to William Gustave 
Kurth of Andover, Sept. 18, 1954. Joan Mor- 
rison and Joan Barnard were bridesmaids. 
Mr. Kurth is an alumnus of Tabor Academy 
and received his degree from Bowdoin Col- 
lege in June. 

Randi Sontum to Lt. James G. Fegley of 
the U. S. Air Force, December, 1953. They 
are stationed in French Morocco. 

1953 

Nancy Bailey was a member of the cast of 
The Avenue, one of the plays presented as 
part of the Acting Technical Workshop pro- 
duction, given at Vassar last December. 

Beverly Berkey is studying at the Uni- 
versity of Oklahoma. 

Carol Burton has transferred from North- 
western to Wells College. 

Drusilla Flather is business manager of 
the college newspaper at Pine Manor Junior 
College. 

Polly Jackson spent the summer touring 
Europe with the Chamber Singers, a choral 
group from Smith College. 

Mary Owl's family have moved to Lap- 
wai, Idaho, where her father has charge of 



four reservations. Mary spent the summer 
there, and taught a class of 7-9 year-olds 
in Bible School. 

Dee Pettit has transferred from Hollins 
to Connecticut College. 

Mary Scandura toured Europe last sum- 
mer with the Simmons College Glee Club. 
Married 

Ruth Gardner to John Henshaw Crider, 
Jr. of South Salem, N. Y., June 10, 1954. 
Mr. Crider attended St. Paul's School, and 
is a student at Harvard. 

1954 

The class of 1954 held an informal re- 
union at Schrafft's in New York on Sept. 7. 
The following attended: Vicky, Jackie, Les- 
lie, Panna, Nemo, Audrey, Marty, Pat 
Bennett, Sally Jones, Nancy Donnelly, and 
Jane Church. 

Past Faculty 

Married 

Ann Hornor to Louis Ammi Cutter of 
Cambridge, June 18, 1954. 

Idanelle S. McMurry to William F. 
Brown, June 25, 1954, in Cookeville, Tenn. 
Born 
To Edith Grassi Grassi, a son, Clement, 
April 6, 1954. 



A list of changes of address since the Register is available. If you 
would like a copy, send your request to the Alumnae Office. 



28 



I fyjaun, Attention, PleaAe! 

Please send news items to the Alumnae Office, Abbot Academy, Ando- 
ver, Mass., before January 15, 1955. 






Today's date 

Maiden Name Class 

Married Name 

Address 




Sent by the School to all Abbot Girls 




Abbot Academy Bulletin 

February 1955 



ABBOT ACADEMY BULLETIN 



Series 22 



FEBRUARY, 1955 



Issue 2 



Abbot Academy Alumnae Association 

Associate Member of the American Alumni Council 



President 
Miss Irene Atwood 

180 Commonwealth Ave. 
Boston 16, Mass. 

Vice-Presidents 
Mrs. Edmund W. Nutting 
(Mary Howard) 
2 1 Wave Ave. 
Wakefield, Mass. 

Miss Dorothy Taylor 
118 Elgin Street 
Newton Centre 59, Mass. 

Mrs. A. Lawrence Van Wart 
(Betty Weaver) ' 
160 Melrose Place 
Ridgewood, N. J. 



OFFICERS— 1954-1956 

Clerk 
Mrs. Robert C. Holland 
(Barbara Healey) 
211 Chestnut Street 
Andover, Mass. 

Treasurer 
Mrs. Lawrence D. Bragg, Jr. 
(Mary Dooley) 
Alden Road 
Andover, Mass. 

General Secretary 
Miss C. Jane Sullivan 
97 Knox Street 
Lawrence, Mass. 



Alumnae Trustees 
1951-1957 
Mrs. H. Guyford Stever 
(Louise Risley) 
16 Edgehill Dr., BelleHaven 
Alexandria, Va. 

1954-1960 
Mrs. Herbert P. Carter 
(Pauline Humeston) 
163 Glenwood Road 
Englewood, N. J. 



ABBOT CLUB PRESIDENTS 



BOSTON 
Mrs. David Ewing 
(Elizabeth Bennett) 
96 Foster Street 
Cambridge, Mass. 

CHICAGO 

Mrs. Floyd Shumway 

(Margaret Rabling) 

815 East Deer path 

Lake Forest, Illinois 

CONNECTICUT 
Mrs. Donald Hoggson 
(Gertrude Drummond) 
R.F.D. 
Lakeville, Conn. 

DETROIT 
Mrs. Howard H. Fitzgerald 
(Jean Craig) 
19091 Bedford Road 
Birmingham, Mich. 



MAINE, EASTERN 

Mrs. Richard Roberts 
(Dorothy Spear) 
Payson Road 
Falmouth Foreside, Maine 

MAINE, WESTERN 
Mrs. Frank N. Wells 
(Louise Houghton) 
32 Ship Channel Road 
South Portland, Maine 



NEW YORK 

President 
Mrs. Lucien R. Tharaud 
(Cynthia James) 
1 7 East 96th Street 
New York 28, N. Y. 



OHIO, CENTRAL 
Mrs. John B. Gager 
(Thelma Mazey) 
228 N. Drexel Avenue 
Columbus 9, Ohio 

OHIO, CLEVELAND 
Mrs. Jerry L. Mercer 
(Molly Hubbard) 
1 9560 Telbir Ave. 
Rocky River 16, Ohio 

OLD COLONY 
Mrs. Oscar M. Finger 

(Martha Wind) 
8 Belcher Avenue 
Brockton, Mass. 



THE EDITORIAL BOARD 

Jane B. Carpenter, 1892, honorary 
Constance Parker Chipman, 1906, honorary 
C.Jane Sullivan, 1931, Editor-in-Chief 
Irene Atwood, 1918, ex officio 



Published lour times yearly, October, February, May, and September, by Abbot Acad- 
emy, Andover, Massachusetts. 

Entered as second class matter December 12, 1933, at the post office at Andover, Mass- 
achusetts, under the act of August 24, 191 2. 



Winter Calendar — 1955 



4 
8 

.9 
i5 
16 

21- 
22 
- > 
25' 
29 

30 



12 

13 

19 
20 



26 

2/ 

5 



12 

19 
20 

2T 
00 



-— School re-opened after Christmas Vacation 

— Faculty Show for the Gymnasium Fund 

— Northfield Vespers 

— - Hanson Baldwin — Current Events Lecture 

— Vespers — The Reverend Roy L. Minich, D.D., The First 

Church, Maiden 
■25 — Mid-year Examinations 

— Gwendolyn Belie, Contralto — Recital 

— Vespers — Hymn Singing 
■2/ — Seniors at Intervale 

— Celebrity Series at Phillips Academy 

— Boston Symphony Concert 

Vespers — Dr. Albert I. Gordon — Temple Emanuel, New- 
ton Centre 

— Abbot-Exeter Glee Club Concert at Exeter 

-v- Vespers — The Reverend Palfrey Perkins, D.D., Minister 
Emeritus, King's Chapel in Boston 

— Elias Ward — "Jungle Beasts" (Illustrated Lecture) 

— Vespers — The Reverend Victor F. Scalise, Calvary Baptist 

Church, Lowell 

— Dorothy Minty, Violinist — Recital 

— Boston Symphony Concert 

Vespers — Rev. Russell T. Loesch — Minister and Secretary 
to the Chaplains and Armed Forces Personnel of the 
Congregational Christian Churches of America 

— Abbot-St. Mark's School Glee Club Concert at Abbot 

— Vespers — Dr. Hans Sidon — Teacher of Bible at Abbot 

— Prom 

— Prom Chapel in the morning — The Reverend Phillip A. 

Smith, Christ Church, Exeter 
- — Dorothy Crawford — Monologuist 

— Student Recital 

— Junior Class Play 

— Vespers — The Reverend John Wallace. D.D., The First 

Church of Christ, Springfield 

— Gym Exhibit 

— School closes for Spring Vacation 



Alumnae Reunions and Annual Meeting of Alumnae 

Association May 7 



SAVE THIS DATE 




MARGUERITE C. HEARSEY 

Principal, 1936-1955 



Abbot Alumnae Salute 
Marguerite Hearsey 

It is with great regret and a real feeling of per- 
sonal loss that Abbot alumnae bid farewell to 
Marguerite Hearsey as principal of our school. 
Coming to Abbot in 1936 as a stranger to most 
of us, she very quickly made us feel that she was 
a friend of all of us. 

The many ways in which Abbot has benefited 
during her years as principal can and will be 
better told by others. For the alumnae I can 
only express our deep appreciation of her unsel- 
fish devotion and untiring effort in making 
Abbot a better school year by year. To do this 
has meant giving up many personal plans and 
dreams, which we hope may now be realized. 

Our heartiest good wishes and affection go 
with her wherever she may be. 

Irene Atwood 

President of the 
Alumnae Association 



The alumnae will be interested in the following excerpt 
from a letter written to Robert I. Hunneman, president 
of the Board of Trustees, by John M. Kemper, head- 
master of Phillips Academy, Andover, in making his 
contribution to the Gymnasium Fund. 



" . . . . mine is an especially warm feeling for Abbot. 

The last uprising of the Sioux Indians occurred at Pine Ridge Agency, 
North Dakota, in 1890. The Second Infantry Regiment was sent to suppress 
it, and during the campaign a young officer was killed. He left a widow and 
three little girls, the oldest aged ten. It was not until twenty-five years later 
that the government could honor the widow's pension claim. Meanwhile she 
had no resources and went to live with her brother, another Army officer. In 
1898 he was killed in action at San Juan Hill in Cuba. Again there was no 
pension, but brother officers secured for the widow a job as clerk in the War 
Department. 

"Up until this time her daughters had had only such education as was 
afforded by an elementary school located near (say an hour's horseback ride) 
a Texas Army Post. Then, happily, a cousin of the family found himself able 
to send the girls to Abbot. 

"Many times have I heard what an adventure this turned out to be, for 
the eldest sister was my mother, Mercer Mason, '02. Though she was eighteen 
when she entered, she'd been only through the sixth grade. She knew far 
more of horses than of books. Doubtless the traditional walks of Abbot girls 
struck her as a strange, if not awkward, w r ay of getting around. She said she 
had to work hard both to catch up and keep up, but that it was an exciting 
business, a whole new w 7 orld she'd never dreamed existed. And though she 
went no further with her formal training, hers was a lifetime interest in books 
and ideas and all that went on in the world around her. I knew her as an 
articulate, literate, and cultivated lady. I think Abbot could do no more for 
a woman. 

"She loved the school. She never missed a reunion when she was close 
enough to Andover to get there. On several such occasions she was given the 
privilege of speaking to the girls. I venture those were lively chapels; she 
could always get a crowd laughing. 

"This is the story of one Abbot girl. I could tell of others. I am not only 
the son and nephew of alumnae, but son-in-law and nephew-in-law as well. 
With luck I may even be the father of one some day if a present-day Middler 
does not exhaust the monumental patience of the Abbot faculty. 

"For all these women of my family — and of the Abbot family — I have 
great respect as well as affection. The respect properly extends to their school 
for its influence upon them. 

"I am also an admirer of Miss Hearsey. Here is a fine person and a great 



Headmistress. As her neighbor, as father of one of her girls, and as a colleague, 
I can sense as perhaps can few others the fine influence she is as scholar, lady, 
and friend, in the lives of her girls. Further, and as if all those girls were not a 
sufficient handful, she must struggle with the incredibly difficult problem for 
a headmistress, of having all my boys for such close neighbors. They, not to 
mention men generally, are little help when one strives to inculcate in young 
ladies some semblance of learning at this all too readily divertible age. 

"I hope the alumnae and parents will rally to Abbot's support. The 
school clearly needs this fine new facility." 



Club News 

Boston 

The winter meeting was held January 26, at the Harvard Club in Bos- 
ton. Dr. Roswell Gallagher, former school physician at Phillips Academy, dis- 
cussed the new adolescent unit of the Children's Medical Centre of which he 
is director. 

The joint luncheon meeting of the Boston Abbot Club and the Alumnae 
Association will be held March 12, at 12:30 p.m., at the Women's City Club 
in Boston. Miss Hearsey will be the speaker. 

New Jersey 

Miss Hearsey and Miss Sullivan attended a tea in October at the home 
of Mary Burton Blakney '46, for alumnae in the Montlcair and Summit areas. 

New York 

The annual meeting will be held at 1 130, April 2, at the Barclay. Dessert 
will be served. Miss Friskin will give a recital. All alumnae in the area are 
cordially invited. 

Washington 

Miss Hearsey will speak at a meeting of all alumnae in the Washing- 
ton area March 1. Call Mrs. Harold D. Sollenberger (Elizabeth Travis 
'40), 4536 North 26th Street, Arlington, Va., if you wish to attend. 



Root and Branch i 

By Elisabeth Luce Moore, '19 
(Reprinted from Wellesley Alumnae Magazine — November 1954) 

Alumnae must not miss Jean Lyon's {Wellesley *2o) book on India, "Just 
Half a World Away: My Search for the New India" (Thomas T. Crowell 
Co., New York, 1954, price $4.50). It is reviewed for the Magazine by 

Elisabeth Luce Moore 

As Jean Lyon's classmate at Wellesley thirty years ago, and long before 
that at the Shanghai American School, I am her contemporary and therefore 
enormously proud of her sheer youthful vigor without which the material for 
this book could never have been collected. For three years Jean Lyon Mc- 
Connell lived in primitive villages, ate the hot curries and the dusty un- 
leavened pancakes, drank from the roadside tea stalls, slept in mud huts that 
had been neatly washed with solutions of water and cow-dung — her very 
roommates the cows themselves, sacred if somewhat asthmatic. 

To reach a remote village in the Himalayas near the Tibetan border, she 
jeeped as far as possible, then slogged the last twenty-three miles on foot over 
steep mountain trails — and all because she had decided to cover for American 
newspapers the historic fact of India's first general election — and at the grass 
roots among villagers 85% illiterate. 

She traveled more luxuriously, but no less hazardously, in a tiny Beech- 
craft piloted by a maharajah on one of his electioneering junkets. (A subse- 
quent flight with a different girl ended in his fatal crash while buzzing a bull- 
ock cart.) She flew in more dignified company, with Nehru in his private 
plane, to the flooded area of Bihar where she watched the effect of the adoring 
populace on Nehru and listened to him speak to them in the gentle, fatherly 
way that none the less enthralls them. 

More often she was lurching in ancient buses or "taxis" which bucked 
and stalled, sometimes while fording rivers. She thought nothing of tucking up 
her skirts, kicking off her sandals, and wading across — determined as she was 
to see for herself the saintly ashrams, the agricultural experiments, the model 
city by Le Corbusier, the holy man who walks and talks India's landowners 
into giving away millions of acres. 

Hers was an impressive trek. Even more impressive is the fact that she 
took time off to think through what she had seen and heard and felt. Sunning 
herself on the famous Cape Comorin at the southernmost tip of India — and 
later living in a hamlet of recluses high in the snows of the Himalayas — she 
meditated. Then she set down in highly readable fashion an informative and 
illuminating book. It will be read, I hope, by those who are exasperated by 
India's ambivalence, and yet convinced that India's decision is important not 
just to India but to us, just half a world away. 



Moving on to India when she could no longer function freely as a news 
correspondent in Communist China, Jean Lyon shared the usual frustration 
and bafflement in trying to "understand India." She was looking for "the 
new India" and she thought she was finding it in superimposed layers — 
each Indian being a cross section of those layers. 

She had observed the first modern elections in ancient settings. She had 
seen passionate young government employees living in primitive villages 
coaxing farmers to use better seed, skillfully persuading the villagers to dig a 
well for the untouchables. She had watched a dedicated doctor "flipping 
out," with questionable hygienic precautions, five hundred cataracts a day, 
so that the poor farmers could have "just enough sight to plow their furrow." 
The doctor's training had been in the West but his driving force came from 
Gandhi's words of praise: "You are performing miracles for India." She 
heard the English language used as the common medium of communication, 
and beautifully used — in Parliament, for instance, where the suave, witty 
speeches would put many a U. S. Congressman to shame. 

One early morning she stepped onto a train at Jodhpur so early the 
night passengers were still asleep. Quiet as she was, she wakened the young 
man in her compartment. He took no notice of her, but started upon his 
elaborate morning rites of Hindu worship, which included long ablutions, 
fresh white clothes, and ceremonies over a miniature painting which he 
decorated gravely with golden threads and the petals of a marigold. An hour 
later he disappeared once more into the bathroom, changed completely into 
well-tailored British clothes — then formally bade her good-morning, and 
entered into a pleasant discourse on English gardens, for he was a govern- 
ment horticultural director. 

Brooding on all these incongruities, and many more, the author began to 
understand complexities of India's castes, religion and regional character- 
istics. She found each of thirteen major language groups taking pride in its 
tongue and its literature. Both the Hindu and the Moslem religions are pow- 
erful influences devoutly nurtured, as is also Christianity in various forms. 
Profoundly moving is the account of a visit to a "Syrian" Christian com- 
munity, one of the oldest of Christian Churches, dating back to the first cen- 
tury in Antioch, and using in daily worship Syriac, the language spoken by 
Christ. 

Slowly Jean Lyon abandoned her theory of "layers" and began think- 
ing of India today as a great banyan tree sending forth new branches only 
to find them bending down to form new roots so that roots and branches have 
become indistinguishable. There are conflicts among India's new rulers as to 
how the tree should be pruned and nurtured — how, for instance, Gandhi's 
village economy (each villager with spindle in hand) can be harmonized with 
huge textile factories, hydroelectric plants, and mechanized farming. But the 
desire is there to make the spreading banyan tree bear better fruit. And Jean 
Lyon is so good a reporter, so straight a thinker, that she helps us understand 
why the Indians' preference in fruit is not always the same as ours. 



A Few Bits from the Desk of Our 
Treasurer, Mr. Flagg 

i. An alumna asks for the "phrasing of a provision" which will cover her 
prospective bequest for a Scholarship Fund to Abbot. 

2. Another comments, "I was back for the anniversary and I was delighted 

with the very healthy condition of the school and its progressive 
spirit'\ 

3. Legacy — "To the Alumnae Association of Abbot Academy the sum of 

Five Hundred Dollars ($500) to be devoted to the purpose of its or- 
ganization and work". 

4. Legacy — "To Abbot Academy the sum of One Thousand ($1000) — un- 

restricted." 

5. Gift Taxes — The new law encourages gifts to schools by an additional 10% 

allowance to individuals if that 10% consists of contributions to a 
tax exempt educational organization. 

(a) Accordingly an individual may now give up to 30% of annual 

income to Abbot free of federal income tax. 

(b) By giving to Abbot securities which have risen in value and on 

which the income is extremely low a person can save the capital 
gains tax. Abbot can sell such securities at current market and 
the giver can deduct this sale price in a tax return. The idea is 
that people with capital gains might better give securities to the 
school than sell and give the proceeds and pay the capital gains 
tax. 

6. Population Trends — A statistician placed the following notation upon my 

desk recently. 

"Since 1940 U. S. population has grown 22%. The number of 
children under 10 has grown 57%. The number of households 
has increased 33% with the national income virtually tripled." 

And this in a 14-year period! What a fertile field to cultivate with 
the philosophy of a purposeful life in all its wealth of possible 
attainment. 

What do these factors mean to the Abbot of today and the Abbot of 
tomorrow? 

7. Abbofs Size — Abbot is a school limited in its membership. This increases 

the greatness of its charm and power. By remaining small it has been 
able to stress the quality of its educational processes, a tradition for 
solid work and its emphasis on the close association with the indi- 
vidual student. 

8. There seems to be an increasing desire among many parents to avoid 

mass production methods in viewing the increasing pressure on the 
public schools. 

8 



Schools like Abbot with facilities of outstanding excellence 
among independent schools for over a century and a quarter, with a 
faculty and student body which makes any school great, should at all 
future times as in the past be strongly supported from a financial 
standpoint. As one alumna recently vouchsafed to your Treasurer — 
"Abbot has tone and character that I hope will always be a 
part of its life." 
Inspired teaching is its watchword ! 
9. Scholarship Needs — Ever present is the need for substantial gifts for our 
scholarship funds as well as the annual alumnae gift which has been 
of such signal help to the school and increasingly so with each passing 
year. Whether it is one dollar or several thousands in gift, Abbot's 
applicants and students receive the benefit and the assistance. So 
Abbot depends as ever upon the wide benevolence of those who are 
serving the fundamentals in our living problems. And she depends 
upon her daughters who increasingly recognize with their devotion 
the institution to which they owe so much. 

10. Abbot does not "beg" for funds — 

One alumna recently told the Treasurer — "I review how much I 
need to give." 

This view is not based on "how much Abbot needs." If we all held to this 
view and practice, we would see the unexpected realized — funds 
met and surpassed, more and more people brought into active par- 
ticipation. 

Another Alumna said — 

"When I see for myself what the facts are as to need for scholar- 
ship, I can give a spot decision and that is, I'm all for it. My Abbot 
school life is dearer to me than college". 

An idea is the most powerful force in the world. Abbot training 
tries to spread ideas that will prove that her graduates nurture the 
best in this world's citizenship. 

1 1 . As your Treasurer I am most appreciative of suggestions and constructive 

criticism from graduates and undergraduates alike. 



Maryse Besso '53 — Honor Roll — Pine Manor Junior College 
Anna Hewlett '54 — Delegate of Freshman Class to Representative Assem- 
bly — Barnard College 
Caroline Kimberly '50 — Dean's List — Pembroke College 
Nancy Mercer '51 — Dean's List — Bouve 
Joan Wheeler '54 — President of Freshman Class — Smith College 




CO 
Jh 

nS 

v 

X 



13 






bo 

G 

'S 
<u 



o 
o 

C 



i — \ to 



bo. 2 

o „ 

CO C 

.2-3 
So? 

Id 

c „ 

SO £ 

CO •— I 

-9 5 ^ 



>H 



Q 

< 



U 

PQ 



§ d 8 
a"SO 

C „ co 

h ^ 2 

S l m 



H 
O 



OJ 



u v 



~ Si 



Si 

V 
CD r 

00 > 

h C/3 



^ 2 ^£ 



o 
Q 



<u 

S 53 S § -> 

Ji 7. .3 

** ^ ^ -8 rt 

s| 1 



-73 C/3 ~« 

2 e 



fi 



1-a 

2 o 






Alumnae Trustee Report 

Last October I had the great pleasure of attending for the first time a 
meeting of the Board of Trustees of Abbot Academy. The Board met at five 
p.m. at the Harvard Club in Boston and except for conversation during din- 
ner continued with its business until 9:30. I was particularly struck with the 
devoted interest, far-sightedness and specific knowledge of the details of the 
school which the board members showed. 

That evening Mr. Radford Abbot drove Miss Hearsey, Mr. Flagg and 
me out to Andover where I spent a most comfortable night in the lovely 
alumnae guest room of Abbey House. The next morning I was Miss Hear- 
sey's guest at her table for breakfast. The system, new to our generation, of 
the girls serving the tables seemed friendly and efficient. Since it was my 
first visit to Abbot in many years Miss Hearsey showed me the changes in 
Draper Hall: the light paint in the reception rooms, the new office space in 
the old "rec" room, the new location of the mail boxes in the old library, and, 
best of all, the new library. 

At chapel, which was bursting at the seams, I had a wonderful oppor- 
tunity of looking at the girls as they left the chapel. I must admit I was very 
impressed with the girls. They looked like a happy, well-adjusted, alert, and 
most attractive group. 

It was a queer experience to be in chapel. I did not have to close my 
eyes to feel I was back in school in 1926 or 27. It was because while most of 
the faculty were new (actually all except Miss Friskin and Miss Hearsey, 
who had taught me a wonderful course in English composition in Wellesley 
my freshman year), they somehow seemed the same. It was equally true of 
the students. They differed only in that these girls wore lipstick and socks 
instead of stockings. 

It was a very satisfying experience to go to chapel. I remember my father 
asked me once when I was very young whether I had lived long enough to 
know what it was to be sorry for something I had done. I was surprised be- 
cause I thought no one had to live very long to experience that feeling. In 
chapel it occurred to me that no one has to live very long before he experi- 
ences the satisfaction of knowing he can count on some things. I felt an Abbot 
girl knows she can count on Abbot. You may not revisit the school for years, 
and you may find many changes from new buildings and hatless afternoon 



11 



walks to new faces in faculty and students, but essentially Abbot remains the 
same. You find the same dedication of its headmistress, officers, faculty and 
staff, the same scholastic integrity in its teaching, and the same devotion to 
Christian principles in daily living. In these days of stress and uncertainty it 
seems to me that a school which can make that contribution to its time is of 
incalculable value. 

After the ritual of morning tiffin, because I had a daughter doing com- 
parable work I visited a senior class in English and was impressed with the 
mature approach to the subject which seemed more advanced than one 
would expect to find in preparatory work. 

Later in the morning Miss Hearsey took me on a tour of McKeen Hall, 
showing me how they hoped to convert certain areas into classroom space as 
soon as the room is made available by the building of the new gymnasium. 
At even a glance it is certainly most apparent that the lack of a gymnasium 
is making it difficult for the school to operate efficiently. Many of the prob- 
lems will be solved automatically as soon as the new gym can be opened. So 
if you have deferred making a contribution, please send it today. 

Jane Sullivan showed me the Alumnae Office and told me a little about 
the difficulties under which her office works. I should like to make the plea 
that you keep her office informed on vital statistics and all other pertinent 
information. Her office can do only as good a job, in some aspects of the 
work, as your cooperation will permit. 

Jane drove me into Boston at noon which made me feel like visiting- 
royalty. I left Andover with the feeling that it was a valued experience to 
have gone to Abbot, a very real privilege to be serving as an Alumnae Trustee, 
and a present challenge to all Abbot girls and friends to enable the school to 
develop in such a way that it may respond fully to the increasing demands of 
today and tomorrow. 

I wish each one of you could have visited Abbot as I did. Since that was 
not possible I thought I should like to write you about my visit. 

Those of you who live within commuting distance of New York please 
save April 2 for the New York Abbot Club meeting. Let's get together then. 

With all good wishes for 1955, 

Polly Humeston Carter 



12 



Abbot Second Century Alumnae Fund 

February 1, 1955 

Gymnasium - - $16,411.12 
Scholarship - - $1,382.45 
Total - - - - $17,793.57 



Leading Contributions 




Highest Number 




by Class 




of Contributors 




1927 — Si 442 




191 6 — 32 




1 91 6 — Si 32 1 




1919— 21 




1893 — $1070 




1929—21 




1954— $79 6 




1930—20 
1941 — 20 




1 901— $635 




1952 — 20 




Highest Percentage 




Highest Percentage 




of Contributors 




of Contributors 




by Class 




by Areas 




1 9*6— 73%) 




Springfield, Mass. 


54% 


1915-68% 




State of Georgia 


53% 


191 1— 59%o 




Smith College 


50% 


1 900 — 56% 




Andover, Mass. 


49% 


! 1891—50% 




Wakefield, Mass. 


47% 


1909—5°% 




Youngstown, Ohio 


47% 



730 contributors 22% of total alumnae 

Average Gift — $24.38 



George E. Abbot Memorial Gymnasium 

Fund 

Total - $169,811 

Alumnae Contributions represent 10% of this total 

Still To Be Raised - $130,189 



13 



Class Fund Secretaries 

1954 — 1955 



1892 Miss Jane B. Carpenter 

1893 Mrs. Norwin S. Bean {Elizabeth Nichols) 

1894 Mrs. Edgar G. Holt {Hanna Greene) 

1900 Mrs. Arthur P. Spear {Grace Chapman) 

1901 Miss Helen Hale 

1902 Miss Honora Spalding 

1903 Mrs. R. Clyde Gerber {Marjorie Wilson) 

1905 Mrs. W. S. Knickerbocker {Frances Cutler) 

1906 Mrs. Reeve Chipman {Constance Parker) 

1907 Mrs. J. Edward Crowley {Marjorie Bond) 

1908 Miss Mary Howell 

1909 Miss Sarah T. Knox 

1910 Mrs. Harold Hammond {Clarissa Hall) 

1911 Mrs. Douglas Donald {Edith Johnson) 

1913 Miss Margaret Wilkins 

1914 Mrs. Lowell Sloan {Elsie Gleason) 

1915 Mrs. Frederick S. Blodgett {Jessie Nye) 

1916 Mrs. Richard C. Bartlett {Dorothy Pillsbury) 

1917 Miss Frances K. Gere 

1918 Mrs. George J. Cutler {Velma Rowell) 

1919 Mrs. Kenneth C. Dow {Kathryn Beck) 

1920 Miss Louise Robinson 

1921 Mrs. Richard K. Stover {Frances Gasser) 

1922 Mrs. Leslie B. Sanders {Geneva Burr) 

1924 Mrs. Ernest W. Mitchell {Katherine Hart) 

1925 Mrs. Robert N. Marsh {Dorothy Beeley) 

1926 Miss Carlotta Sloper 

1927 Mrs. Irving P. Gramkow {Margaret Nay) 

1928 Mrs. Norman E. Sherwood {Jean Swihart) 

1929 Mrs. Laurent A. Daloz {Lois Hardy) 

1930 Mrs. James F. Mathias {Barbara Lord) 

1931 Mrs. Francis Holland {Barbara Graham) 

1932 Mrs. Lyman S. Appleton {Helen M. Cutler) 

1933 Mrs. Frank P. Foster {Ethel Rogers) 

1934 Mrs. Sarah Loria {Sarah O'Reilly) 

1935 Mrs. Norman S. Lane {Cecile Van Peursem) 

1936 Miss Mary Swan 

1937 Mrs. Sydney P. Harrison {Jeannette Partridge) 

1938 Mrs. John Brown {Mary Elliot) 

1940 Miss Nancy Harrison 

1941 Mrs. Bertram H. Roberts {Frances Troub) 

1942 Miss Margaret McFarlin 

1943 Mrs. Robert P. Rudolph {Joyce Tqffa) 

1944 Miss Charlotte Leland 

1945 Mrs. Charles Holzwarth {Shirley Sommer) 

1946 Mrs. Peter J. Blakney {Mary Burton) 

1947 Miss Sally Humason 

1948 Mrs. Thomas Stewart {Nancy Elliot) 

1949 Mrs. John M. Scott {Wendy Scott) 

1950 Mrs. Franklin Fogertey {Judith M. Lange) 

1951 Miss Carolin Furst 

1952 Miss Persis Goodnow 

1953 Miss Martha Gross 

Assistants: Miss Caroline Benedict and Miss Pamela Bushnell 

1954 Miss Suzanne Kent 

Assistants: Miss Martha Belknap and Miss Nancy Donnelly 



14 



^JcJie a £<uv, /Ilea GU*ti>u>H&n 

a+td GlaU tf-u+td BecAjetasU&i 

The Gymnasium Fund has passed the halfway mark ! Of the $300,000 
needed, $169,811 has been received in contributions and pledges. Alumnae 
gifts total $17,793 from 730 contributors. Abbot is proud of its alumnae sup- 
port thus far in this important Building Fund program. Back of almost every 
alumnae dollar received is the enthusiastic work of 100 Area Chairmen and 
50 Class Fund Secretaries who have been in touch with alumnae throughout 
the United States. You deserve a hearty vote of thanks for all you have done 
to swell the Gymnasium Fund. The Alumnae Office is also appreciative of the 
changes of address you have sent for alumnae in your areas. The Gym- 
nasium Building Fund Committee joins me in sending you many thanks for 
your fine work in helping the school attain "A New Gymnasium for Abbot." 

BUT, our goal is not yet reached and there is still real work to be done, 
and need for more contributions by alumnae. Let's all pull together so that 
some of Abbot's present students and all future students may enjoy the bene- 
fits of a fine new Gymnasium. It's time to give ! 

Mary Howard Nutting '40, (Mrs. Edward W.) 

Chairman of Alumnae Fund 



Alumnae Area Chairmen and 
Percentages Contributing in Each Area 



Geographical Areas 



Percentages 



Area Chairmen 



Arkansas, Louisiana and Mississippi 
California, northern 
California, southern 
Colorado and Utah 

Connecticut 
Darien area 
Bridgeport area 
Hartford area 
Litchfield County area 
New Canaan area 
New Haven area 
New London area 
Waterbury-New Britain area 

Florida 
Miami area 
St. Petersburg area 
Winter Park area 

Georgia 



13°/o 

9% 

10% 

12% 



29% 
33% 
31°/o 
32% 
30% 
36% 
22% 
33% 



Mary MaffVugh (Mrs. John H.) '40 
Frances Wright Kimball (Mrs. F. W 
Margaret C. Wilkins '13 
Josephine Hartwell Boddington (Mrs 
liam E.) '41 



'09 



Wil- 



Marcia Rudd Keil (Mrs. Carl) '31 

Metta Bettels Smith (Mrs. Roland F. W.) '31 

Julie Sherman Tibbetts (Mrs. Howard) '18 

Louise Robinson '20 

Rosamond Castle Olivetti (Mrs. Dino) '30 

Ruth Allen Healy (Mrs. Kent F.) '18 

Ruth W. Newcomb '10 

Phyllis England Letts (Mrs. Malcolm) '38 



23% Jane Edwards Holbrook (Mrs. Eugene) '52 

23% Frances Chandler Futch (Mrs. Wm.) '40 

16% Jessie McCreery Reed (Mrs. Philip) '41 

53% Alicia Cooper Wright (Mrs. Barry, Jr.) '48 



15 



Illinois 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Maine 
Bath area 
Southeastern area 
Waterville area 

Maryland 

Baltimore area 

Massachusetts 
Andover 

Arlington-Belmont 
Beverly area 
Boston 
Brockton 

Deerfield-Greenfield area 
Fall River area 
Fitchburg area 
Hingham area 

Jamaica Plain area 
Lawrence area 
Lexington area 
Marblehead area 
Marlboro area 
Melrose area 
Mt. Holyoke College 
Newburyport area 
Newton 
North Andover 
Plymouth area 
Smith College 
Springfield area 
Wakefield area 
Wellesley area 
Wellesley College 
Westford-Lowell area 
Winchester area 
Wheaton College 
Worcester area 

Michigan 

Birmingham area 
Flint area 



13% Mary Miller Hart (Mrs. Reeves, Jr.) '47 

13% Theodora Manning Alexander (Mrs. Herbert ' 

M.) '42 
19% Jessamine Patton Kennedy (Mrs. George D ) 

'45 

13% Julie Cross Musk (Mrs. George K.) '27 
42% Emma Holt Garside (Mrs. Thomas H.) '14 
0% Margaret O'Leary White (Mrs. John) '31 



31% Norma Forsyth Williams (Mrs. Sears) '38 



49% 
20% 
23% 

31% 

20% 
20% 
27% 
0% 
19% 

11% 
20% 

9% 

23% 

17% 
27% 
25% 
15% 
21% 
H% 
7% 
50% 
54% 
47% 
25% 
16% 
15% 
31% 
46% 

19% 



Helen Cutler Appleton (Mrs. Lyman) '32 
Ethel Rogers Foster (Mrs. Frank) '33 
Joyce Toffa Rudolph (Mrs. Robert) '43 
Constance Parker Chipman (Mrs. Reeve) '06 
Mildred Bryant Kussmaul (Mrs. Harry S.) '13 
Millicent Smith Uppvall (Mrs. Bertil) '29 
Maud W. Sprague '06 
Beatrice Lane Mercer (Mrs. John C.) '28 
Mary Margaret Boynton MacPherson (Mrs 

Robert) '42 
Velma Rowell Cutler (Mrs. George) '18 
Katherine G. Hamblet '20 
Carolyn Guptill Hansen (Mrs. Harry) '33 
Barbara Bloomfield Wood (Mrs. Arnold) '26 
Helen Rice Wiles (Mrs. F. Lawson) '33 
Polly Francis Loesch (Mrs. Russell) '29 
Anne L. Sanborn '52 
Louise Bacon Fuller (Mrs. Francis) '18 
Polly Spear Chapin (Mrs. Walter) '36 
Phyllis Saunders Simpson (Mrs. Davis ) '38 
Elizabeth Taylor Amazeen (Mrs. Edward) '29 
Anne M. Oliver '53 

Frances McTernen Coan (Mrs. Prescott) '35 
Ruth Deadman McLennan (Mrs. Allan) '26 
Lois Hardy Daloz (Mrs. Laurent) '29 
Barbara Gibson '51 

Harriet Bolton Allen (Mrs. E. Kent) '32 
Virginia Gay d'Elseaux (Mrs. Frank) '28 
Betsy Aldrich '52 
Edith Ninomiya Hopkins (Mrs. A. Ryce) '42 



13% Jean Craig Fitzgerald (Mrs. Howard, 2nd) '43 
28% Barbara Ball Bacon (Mrs. Donald) '45 

Minnesota and North Dakota 25% Elizabeth Murphy Garrison (Mrs. Herbert) '35 



Missouri 

Kansas City area 

Nebraska 

16 



0% Frances Howard O'Brien (Mrs. James) '25 
0% Cornelia Crittenden '13 



New Hampshire 
Dover area 
Laconia area 
Manchester area 

New Jersey 
Montclair area 
Newark area 
Summit area 

New Mexico 

New York 
Albany area 
Amsterdam area 
Bronxville-Yonkers area 
Buffalo area 
Elmira-Ithaca area 
Mamaroneck area 
New York City area 
Rochester area 
Scarsdale area 

Syracuse area 
Vassar College 

North and South Carolina 

Ohio 

Cincinnati area 
Cleveland area 
Youngstown area 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 
Harrisburg area 
Philadelphia area 
Pittsburgh area 

Rhode Island 
Newport area 
Providence 

Texas 

Dallas area 

Vermont 

Brattleboro area 
Burlington area 

Virginia 

Charlottesville area 
Richmond area 

Washington (State) 

Wisconsin 



33°/ Dorothy Higgins Rand (Mrs. Norman E.) '16 

21°/ Priscilla Russ Shannon (Mrs. John ) '40 

23°/ Sarah T. Knox '09 

18% Mary Burton Blakney (Mrs. Peter J.) '46 

20°/ o Elizabeth Righter Farrar (Mrs. Wm. M.Jr.)'25 

1 1°/ Barbara Reinhart Livingston (Mrs. DeWitt) '36 

17°/ Edda Renouf Gould (Mrs. R. Gordon) '26 



17% 

18°/ 

4% 

13% 
8% 

in, 

16°/ 
33% 

14% 

31% 
11% 



Katherine Kinney Hecox (Mrs. John) '20 

Dorothy G. Niles '16 

Nini Owsley Warwick (Mrs. Jack) '30 

Polly Pancoast Tunkey (Mrs. Wm. C.) '39 

E. Katharine Harris '39 

Barbara Lord Mathias (Mrs. James) '30 

Anne Oakman Deegan (Mrs. Frank) '39 

Margaret Black Dintruff (Mrs. Richard) '49 

Geraldine Treadway Dampier (Mrs. Wm. E. 

'47 
Anne Simpson White (Mrs. John) '38 
Caroline W. Benedict '53 



19% Roberta Kendall Kennedy (Mrs. Rolfe) '29 

24% Elizabeth Rich Ferguson (Mrs. James) '44 

16% Molly Hubbard Mercer (Mrs. Jerry L.) '44 

47% E. B. Ogden Tod (Mrs. David) '48 

7% Virginia L. Eason '47 

0% Ruth Pringle '05 

20% Sarah Finch Hartwell (Mrs. Arthur) '23 

19% Mabel Levering Chestnut (Mrs. Henry) '29 

29% Louise Leslie Oxenham (Mrs. Alfred) '42 

43% Gertrude Campion Soutar (Mrs. James H.) '29 

28% Charlotte Eaton '16 

14% Elizabeth McBride Chapman (Mrs. Jack) '38 

22% Lloyd Pierce Smith (Mrs. Malcolm, Jr.) '39 

4% Madeleine Proctor Woodward (Mrs. Donald R.) 
'38 

24% Julia Nelson Williams (Mrs. Edward) '41 

38% Mary A. Howell '08 

20% Patricia Goss Rhodes (Mrs. James) '39 

16% Sally Stilson Athan (Mrs. Richard) '50 



*7 



ABBOT SECOND CENTURY ALUMNAE FUND 

List of Contributors 

May 17, 1954 — February 1, 1955 

f Regular contributor, 1950- 1954 

Percentages below class numerals indicate per cent of a class contributing to 
Fund, and the amount represents the total contributions from the class. 



1878 
50%— $5 
I Florence Swan 

1880 
S25 
♦Harriet Smith Wilcox 

1884 
25°/ — S25 
Annah Kimball 
1886 
11%— $35 
f Mary Gorton Darling 
1887 
33%— $25 
Angie Dunton Purrington 
^Harriet H. Thwing 

1889 
38%— $112.50 
Lilian Ellis Emerson 
f Flora Mason 
j Alice Newton Judd 

1891 

50%— S27 
Anna Wells Bigelow 
■fKatherine Winegarner Spencer 

1892 
20%— $10 
fjane B. Carpenter 

1893 
25%— $1070 
f Elizabeth Nichols Bean 
Belle Pearson Brooks 
Mary A. Thompson 

1894 
18%— $25 
Aida Dunn Furst 
f Myra Hayes 
Ellen Lombard 

1895 
28%— $85 
t Bessie Adams Tryon 



Charlotte K. Drury 
Kirty Eddy Shaw 
Grace Simonton Young 
Laura Wentworth Richards 

?! 1896 

43%— $190 
Agnes Brown 
f Isabel Chapin Gould 
f Edith Magee 
Jessie Ross Gibby 
In Memory of Frances Saunders 

Morgan 
f Eleanor Thomson Castle 
1897 
19%— $20 
Rose Churchill 
Frances Hinkley Quinby 
| Gertrude Ware Bunce 
1898 

32%— $75 
Lucy Hartwell Peck 
Harriet C. Lord 
Mabelle Norris Oakley 
Florence M. Pease 
Ethel Perley Tyler 
f Amy Stork Kydd 
1899 

25%— $110 
Emma Clark Mock 
Ethel Gibbs Marr 
Estelle Greenough Easton 
f Lucy Hegeman Hubbell 
t Lilian Mooers Smith 
Alice Titcomb Burke 
f May Young Cox 

1900 
56%— $99 
Mary T. Carleton 
Grace Chapman Spear 
Rose Day Keep 
Carrie Harmon Shaw 
Ethel Hazen Lillard 



Edith Johnston Bliss 
|Mary Morgan Norwood 
f Lottie Redford 
Winifred Todd Mills 
Alice Wood Hodgdon 

1901 
42%— $635 
Elizabeth Bacon Greene 
t Frieda Billings Cushman 
f Ethel Brooks Scott 
Helen Buck 
f Evelyn Carter Giles 
Lillie Dodge Brewster 
Emily Emerson Day 
Katharine French Rockwell 
f Helen Hale 
t Delight Hall Gage 
Harriet A. Lee 

1902 
37%— $140 
Margaret Eshbaugh Adams 
Florence Fletcher Preston 
Tirzah H. Hall 
Belle Johnston Rumford 
f Mildred Mooers Poore 
f Honora Spalding 

1903 
40%— $47 
Jessie Cor bin Bates 
♦Jean David Blunt 
•f Aletta Hegeman 
Nancy Holland Hubbard 
Helen Packard McBride 
Margaret Wilson Gerber 

1904 
43%— $615 
Helen Abbott Allen 
Helen Childs Baldwin 
In Memory of Marion W. 
Cooper 

Contributed prior to death. 



i3 



Mary Davis Lee 
Sarah Field 
Ruth Lane Treadway 
f Elizabeth Schneider 
f Mary Byers Smith 
Emily Stearns Giese 
Julia Wallace Gage 
1905 
14°/ — $50 
f Frances Cutler Knickerbocker 
Fanny Erving Arundale 
Fanny Hazen Ames 

1906 
32°/ — $181 
Helen Ellis Rice 
f Mary Jordan Goodrich 
Carita Kimball Russell 
f E valine Korn Cookman 
f Constance Parker Chipman 
f Rena Porter Hastings 
Maud W. Sprague 

1907 
37%— $199 
f Mabel Allen Buxton 
f Marjory Bond Crowley 
f Laura Howell 
Jean McEwen Brown 
Leonora Parsons Cooper 
f Maria Pillsbury Campbell 
fAnna May Richards Folsom 
Louise Richards Rollins 
Oena Whyte Hall 

1908 
31%— $233 
f Helen Buss Towle 
t Gertrude Caunt Barnes 
f Agnes Bertha Ewart 
f Mary A. Howell 
Winifred Ogden Lindley 
fEsther Parker Lovett 
f Dorothy Taylor 
fMarion Towle Sturgis 
fRuth Van Vliet Fawcett 
Elizabeth Watts 

1909 
50%— $205 
Mary Bourne Boutell 
Mildred Elliott Smith 
Leila Fowler Throckmorton 
Elizabeth S. Fuller 
Janet Gorton 
Hannah Haines Webb 
Helen Hazlewood 
Alice Holt Jenkins 



Sarah Knox 
Louise Norpell Meek 
Helen Weber Mitchell 
"("Frances Wright Kimball 
1910 
43°/ — $137 
f Clarissa Hall Hammond 
| Laura Jackson Austin 
Grace Kellogg 
Ethel Kelsey Perry 
Persis Mclntire Downey 
fRuth Murray Moore 
| Ruth Newcomb 
Ethel Reigcluth Darby 
f Emily Silsby Morgan 
•J" Louise Tuttle Abbott 

1911 
59%— $243 
Marion Bemis Schlesinger 
f Dorothy Bigelow Arms 
Anna Boynton Hemenway 
fMarion Brown 
Olivia C. Flynt 
M. Rhoda Green 
Dora Heys Pym 
Miriam Howard Bushnell 
f Edith Johnson Donald 
Rebecca Newton Weedon 
Ruth JViles Thompson 
f Frances M. Pray 
Margaret Strong Hill 
Ethel Swain Smith 
Mary Sweeney 
f Jessie Wightman Jones 

1912 
46%— $235 
Mildred C. Chutter 
Ruth Draper Hyde 
Alice Hazlewood 
f Barbara Moore Pease 
Dorothy Simpson Faith 
Nora Sweeney 

1913 
48%— $570 
Class Gift 
Mary Boyd Higgins 
Mildred Bryant Kussmaul 
Margaret Day Danforth 
Olga Erickson Tucker 
f Gladys Estabrook Blanchard 
f Hazel Goodrich Waugh 
Helen Hersey Heffernan 
Marion Martin Teeson 
Jane Newton Sheldon 



f Dorothy Perkins Estabrook 
Doris Elizabeth Sawyer 
Helene Symmes 
Louise Thompson Cottrell 
f Margaret Wilkins 

1914 
29%— $332.50 
Louise Allaman Austin 
Elizabeth Bartlett Jenks 
f Harriett Bowman Meeker 
Rosamond Gens Lehnert 
Helen Hanscom Winslow 
Mary Hildreth 
Jessie Lumsden Sherrard 
f Alice Sweeney 
Marie Winsor Appleby 
Margaret Wylie Ware 

1915 
68%— $445 
Elizabeth Allen Belknap 
Rena Atwood Benson 
Muriel Baker Wood 
Marion Barnard Cole 
Eleanor Bartlett Atwater 
f Marian Bayley Buchanan 
fMarion Brooks 
Phyllis Brooks Stevens 
Aurelia Hillman Sanders 
Freda Joslin Sprague 
f Mattie Larrabee Whittemore 
Catherine C. Leach 
Elizabeth F. Leach 
Vivien Mitchell Hall 
Charlotte Morris Perot 
f Jessie Nye Blodgett 
Gertrude Shackleton Hacker 
Josephine Tonner Guernsey 
fMarion Winklebleck Hess 

1916 
73%— $1321 
Vera Allen 

Eleanor Black Draffan 
Dorothy Dann 
Myrtle Dean Lewis 
f Charlotte Eaton 
Eleanor Frary Rogers 
Helene Hardy Bobst 
Dorothy Higgins Rand 
f Mildred Jenkins Dalrymple 
Esther Kilton 
Louise Kimball Jenkins 
Louise King Childs 
Ruth Laton Creesy 
Agnes Leslie 



i9 



Ruth Lindsay Kuhnle 
Inga Little Bouve 
Marion Mellor Dean 
Grace Merrill Emery 
Frances Moses Schubert 
t Dorothy Niles 
Katharine Odell Randall 
Ruth Ottman Steiger 
Bernice Overend Merrill 
f Eugenia Parker 
f Dorothy Pillsbury Bar tie tt 
Alice Prescott Plumb 
f Helene Sands Brown 
Marion Selden Nash 
Emma Stohn Larrabee 
Esther Van Dervoort Howe 
Josephine Walker Woodman 
Elizabeth Wood Gage 

1917 
19%— SI 56 
Miriam Bacon Chellis 
Harriet Balfe Nalle 
Frances K. Gere 
Lucy Lane Church 
Harriet Murdoch Andersson 
Cornelia Mewcomb Lattin 
t Cornelia Sargent Battershill 

1918 
22%— $218 
Ruth Allen Healy 
f Irene Atwood 
f Louise Bacon Fuller 
Gwendolen Brooks Reynolds 
Helen Cutting 
^Marion Hubbard Craig 
Doris Kishlar Crouch 
Marion McPherson 
Julie Sherman Tibbetts 
Margaret B. Speer 
f Margaret Van Voorhis 

1919 
39%— $413 
Elizabeth Armstrong 
Kathryn Beck Dow 
Marea Blackford Fowler 
Gretchen Brown Knights 
Katharine Coe Taylor 
Mary Cole Day 
Cora Erickson Ayers 
Grace Francis Jenkins 
Mildred Frost Eaton 
Josephine Hamilton Leach 
Harriette Harrison 
Elizabeth Hartel Coogan 



f Jane Holt Atkinson 
f Grace Kepner Noble 
Grace Leyser Boynton 
Elisabeth Luce Moore 
Virginia McCauley Otis 
Geraldine Murray Stanton 
Kathreen Moves Pettit 
Nadine Scovill Young 
jMargaret Taylor Stainton 

1920 
27°/ — S273 
Margaret Ackroyd Hunt 
Hope Allen Brown 
Helen Donald Coupe 
Vivien Gowdy Larabee 
"J" Lillian Grumman 
f Elizabeth Hawkes Miller 
f Paula Miller Patrick 
f Muriel Moxley Hubbard 
Helen Polk Barker 
t Louise Robinson 
Elizabeth Stewart Pieters 
Helen Thiel Gravengaard 
Dorothy M. Tyler 
f Charlotte Vose Clark 
fMargaret Worman Thompson 

1921 
18°/ — 385.50 
Ethel Dixon McGee 
Lois Fleming 
Frances Keany Rickard 
Dorothy Martin Buracker 
Elizabeth McClellan Stefani 
Mary Peirce Carty 
Helen Roser 
Jessamine Rugg Patton 
Catherine Swift Weller 
| Eleanor Voorhees 

1922 
28%— $532 
tjane B. Baldwin 
Phyllis Bankart Paulsen 
f Gwendolyn Bloomfield Tillson 
Elizabeth Brewster Thompson 
Geneva Burr Sanders 
Katherine Damon Kletzien 
Ruth Dewey York 
Dorothea Flagg Smith 
Beatrice GofF 
"I* Lois Kirkham Hart 
Helen Knight Wilkinson 
Mary Mallory Pattison 
Alice Van Schmus Smith 
Janet Warren Winslow 



f Susana Welborn Osborn 
Anne C. Whinery 

1923 
17%— $215 
| Nathalie Bartlett Farns worth 
f Martha Buttrick Rogers 
Eve Cross Glendenning 
Francelia Holmes 
f Dolores Osborne Hall 
Elizabeth Peck Watrous 
Mary E. Rudd 
f Mary Swartwood Sinclaire 
Miriam Sweeney McArdle 
Dorothy Taylor Booth 
Esther Wood Peirce 

1924 
32%— SI 72.50 
In memory of 
Elisabeth Barss Eastman 
Sybil Bottomley Talman 
Elizabeth Bragg Mcintosh 
Margaret Bush Ham 
Helen Epler Baketel 
Rebekah W. George 
Caroline Hall Wason 
Betty Harrington Wilson 
Katherine Hart Mitchell 
Eleanor Ireland Saunders 
Helen Keating Ott 
Margaret McDonald Vester 
Margaret McKee De Yoe 
Ruth Pritchard de Rivera 
Genevra C. Rumford 
Constance Twichell 
Elizabeth Willson Naetzker 

1925 
21%— $42 
Elizabeth Burtnett Horle 
Ruth Connolly Burke 
Charlotte Flanna Beveridge 
f Eunice Huntsman 
Evelyn McDougall Hay 
Barbara Melson Twombly 
Nettie Pritchard Potter 
Doris Von Culin Breyer 
Phyllis Tates Shields 

1926 
26%— $473 
Adelaide Black 
"f" Barbara Bloomfield Wood 
Edith Bullen Creden 
| Katherine Clay Sawyer 
Ruth Deadman McLennan 



20 



•[Frances Flagg Sanborn 
Florence MacDougall Ranney 
Edith Ireland Wood 
Virginia Merritt Helfferich 
Alice Perry 
Edda Renouf Gould 
Sylvea Shapleigh Smith 
fCarlotta Sloper 
Ruth Stafford Lamprey 

1927 
21°/ — S1442 
Mary Ayers Hower 
Helen Connolly McGuire 
Julie Cross Musk 
Ellen Faust 
Persis Goodnow Brown 
June Hinman Marques 
Miriam Houdlette Walsh 
f Pauline Humeston Carter 
fMargaret Nay Gramkow 
f Ruth Perry 
Virginia Smith Fuller 
Sydna White 

1928 
11%— $78 
Winifred Dudley Burnham 
f Virginia Gay d'Elseaux 
f Beatrice Lane Mercer 
Susan Ripley Ward 
Theodora Talcott Slater 

1929 
34°/ — S483 
Class Gift 

| Louise Anthony Castor 
Katherine Blunt Polsby 
f Catherine Bowden Barnes 
Gertrude Campion Soutar 
Mary Eaton Graf 
Olive Elsey Weigle 
Barbara Folk Howe 
f Polly Francis Loesch 
Lois Hardy Daloz 
fjeanette M. Hubbard 

! Elizabeth Hulse Freeman 

j Roberta Kendall Kennedy 
Katherine Kennedy Beardsley 

i Mary E. Macdonald 
Catherine A. McDonnell 
Dorothy Newcomb Rogers 
Ruth Shulze Hammond 

i Grace E. Stephens 

i Jean Stewart 

i Elizabeth Taylor Amazeen 

i Rosamond Wheeler Putnam 



1930 
36°/ — $250 
Louise Atkinson Dunstord 
tRuth Baker Johnson 
Donna Brace Kroeck 
Elizabeth Brown Guild 
| Rosamond Castle Olivetti 
Hortense Dunbar 
Kathryn Dutton Leidy 
Alice Eckman Mason 
Florence Gardner Balius 
Cornelia Gould Scott 
Barbara Healey Holland 
Christine Hollands Struck 
Barbara Lamson Cummings 
Barbara Lord Mathias 
Elizabeth Perry Lewis 
Helen Ripley 

Elizabeth Southworth Sutton 
Vivian Southworth Gerstell 
Elizabeth Stout Volz 
Marjorie Turner Fisher 

1931 
34%— $248 
Class Gift 
Doris Allen Carroll 
Katherine Allen Babson 
Metta Bettels Smith 
Emily Bullock 
tNancy Can Holmes 
Abby Castle 
Faith Chipman Parker 
Mary Elizabeth Dix Goddard 
Frances Flory Jones 
Barbara Graham Holland 
Carol Grosvenor Myers 
Dorothy Hunt Bassett 
Marcia Rudd Keil 
Frances Scudder Glisson 
Mary Smead Homier 
C. Jane Sullivan 
Nanine Wheeler Allender 
Marie Whitehill 

1932 
22%— $202 
t Helen Allen Henry 
Isabel Arms 
Elizabeth Bigler deMasi 
Elizabeth M. Boyce 
Virginia Brown Woods 
Helen Cutler Appleton 
Florence Dunbar Robertson 
Constance Hoag Porter 
t Eunice Randall 
Mary Thompson Sherman 



Atossa Welles 
Harriet Wright Miller 

1933 
24%— $290 
Mary Burnham Gazlay 
fMargaret Chase Johnson 
Rozilla Chase Roberts 
Ann Cole Gannett 
Marcia Gaylord Norman 
Carolyn Guptill Hansen 
Alice Hill Turner 
j Frances McGarry Ogg 
Ethel Rogers Foster 
Clara Smith Clark 
Elizabeth Snyder Cady 
Mariatta Tower 

1934 
32%— $206 
In memory of Ann Byron 

Richtmyre 
Katherine Damon Reed 
Marguerite Galloway 
Eleanor Harryman McQuarie 
fE. Cassandra Kinsman Dexter 
f Carolyn Muzzy 
Sarah O'Reilly Loria 
Ann Place Henderson 
Mabel Savage Van Stone 
f Ruth Stott Peters 
Jane Tracy MacGruer 

1935 
33%— $185 
Cathleen Burns Elmer 
Evelyn Chappell Swayze 
Laura Chedel Miller 
Jane Dawes McClennan 
| Susan Hildreth Goodwin 
Martha Howe 
Anne Hurlburt Bradley 
Eleanor Johnson DuToit 
Geraldine Johnson 
Elizabeth Kennedy Woodward 
Frances McTernen Coan 
■j" Elizabeth Morgan Foster 
Cynthia Madden Beebe 
Elizabeth Murphy Garrison 
Claire Oppenheim Marum 
Shirley Powers Haseltine 
Lucia Nunez Mason 
"j" Shirley Smith King 
Barbara Symonds Day 

1936 
19%— $207.50 
Sallv Burns Bowen 



21 



Charlotte Dane von Breton 

fMary Dooley Bragg 

Grace Nichols Knight 

f Barbara Reinhart Livingston 

Elinor Robinson Goodwin 

Mary Swan 

f Mary Trqfton Simonds 

1937 
22°/ — $180 
Nancy Burns McArdle 
f Thelma Cutter Leuenberger 
Nancy Kincaid Vars 
f Jeannette Partridge Harrison 
Geraldine Peck Rockwell 
Barbara Pierpont Craig 
f Martha Ransom Tucker 
Louise Risley Stever 
Martha Sweeney Read 
Joan Todd Wilkinson 
Priscilla Wonson Hahn 

1938 
20%— $243 
Beverly Bridge Moore 
Ann Dooley 
Mary Elliot Brown 
Marjorie Holt Campbell 
Barbara Lee Mill 
Sara Peck 
Anne Simpson White 
Jean Tilton Melby 
Mary Toohey Kruse 
Barbara Tudbury Allen 
Carol Whittemore Fellows 

1939 
15%— $74 
Olive I. Butler 
Mary Koch Danos 
Barbara Leland Pearson 
Florence Mooney Doty 
Polly Pancoast Tunkey 
Jeanne Waugh Harney 

1940 
25%— $410 
Marie Bertram Vander Gheynst 
Gisela Bolten Hogan 
Lee Burnett Peterson 
f Mollie Chase Foster 
Phyllis Crocker England 
Barbara Fowler Borden 
Dorothy Garry Warlick 
Nancy Harrison 
fMary Howard Nutting 
"[Marietta Meyer Ekberg 
fMary Spaulding Powell 



Rachel Whitney Davis 
Nancy Wilson Ainslie 
Gertrude Wind Scheft 

1941 
36%— $222.50 
fjoan Belden McDonough 
Jeannette Biart Warren 
Dorothy Dean Johnson 
Nancy Eccles Roome 
Mary Elizabeth Erkert Altorfer 
Dorothy Fiske Winnette 
Nancy Gerrish MacFadyen 
Alda Grieco Cesarini 
Josephine Hartwell Boddington 
Christine Hill Winship 
Doris Jones Hannegan 
Joan List 

f Suzanne Long Reed 
Margery Martin Martin 
f Julie Nelson Williams 
Eloise Perkins Beck 
| Frances Troub Roberts 
Joan Waugh Campbell 
Dorothy White Wicker 
Nancy Whittier Atkinson 

1942 
26%— $357 
Irene Abbott MacPherson 
Mary L. Bertucio 
Marjorie Dean Marsden 
Betty Jean England Olsen 
Elizabeth Fowler Warrick 
Margaret Goodman Decker 
| Beatrice Hardy Verdery 
"[Barbara Hill Kennedy 
Janice Lenane Scott 
Louise Leslie Oxenham 
Margaret McFarlin 
"{"Marilyn Menschik Westaway 
Ruth Rathbone Hildreth 
f Gretchen Roemer Gay ton 
f Jane Rutherford 
fRuth Snider Bernstein 
Elsie Williams Keyaha 

1943 

25%— $204 

fMary Alice Beckman Huide- 

koper 
Nancy Corwin Wintter 
Jean Craig Fitzgerald 
Amelia Daves Kopald 
Jean Hansen Ashbaugh 
Margaret Howard Long 
Margaret Janssen Gray 



Barbara Lindsay Boynton 

Anne Pearson 

Patricia Pettengill Whi taker 

f Betty e Rutherford McCouch 

Themis Sarris Ellis 

Cynthia Teel Vail 

f Joyce Toff a Rudolph 

1944 
24%— $128 
Patricia Damon Niswander 
Elizabeth Frank Abeles 
M. Louise Honnen Tutt 
fRuth Kir stein Turkanis 
Frances MacDonald Thompson 
Emily McMurray Mead 
Theresa Mastrangelo Mahonev 
Nancy Nicholas Wengert 
Shirley Rhodes Lowe 
Margaret Travis Atwood 
Martha Watkins Curry 
Shirley Woodams Hoesterey 

1945 
22%— $127 
Barbara Ball Bacon 
Barbara Beecher 
Martha Boynton Pawle 
f Esther Bufferd Watstein 
Suzanne Leland Le Feber 
Marion Marsh Birney 
Marjorie Milne Winston 
Katharine Mulford 
f Cynthia Smith McFalls 
Shirley Sommer Holzwarth 
Joan Sweeney 
fMary Taylor 
Edith Walker Upham 

1946 
14%— $52 
Patricia Bowne Rickenbacker 
Mary Burton Blakney 
Cynthia Noone 
Sally North Jones 
Phyllis Rairdon Wilce 
Mavis Twomey Cox 
Elizabeth Woodruff Caperton 

1947 
24%— $185 
Nancy Brumbach Kruvand 
Helen Dowd Richards 
f Virginia Eason 
Edith Flather 
Dorthea Hall Kernan 
Joy Kolins Peisch 






22 



Jane Lewis Gleason 
Sylvia Lyford Morgan 
Mary Lou Miller Harl 
f Martha Morse Abbot 
Jean Ritchey Bora 
Susanne Robbins 
Geraldine Treadway Dampier 
Christine von Goeben Curtis 
Marion White Singleton 

1948 
15°/ — SI 85 
Martha Ball Geiken 
Martha Barber Lowrance 
Alicia Cooper Wright 
Barbara Dake Johnson 
Sue Davis Snyder 
Nancy Elliot Stewart 
Jacqueline Kay 
Marguerite Moss Heery 
Nancy Nalle 
Elizabeth Ogden Tod 

1949 
11%— $69 

Margaret Black Dintruff 
Patricia Bleecker 
Fredericka Brown 
Nancy Jeffers Whittemore 
Faith Johnson Beard 
Madelon Olney Paglee 

1950 
31%— $191 
Joan Aldrich 
Patricia Burke Wright 
Elspeth Caldwell 
t Cynthia Faigle 
Beverley Flather Edwards 
Jane Gafill Towner 
Elizabeth Goodspeed Fellner 
Julia Holt 
Coralie Huberth 
Margaretta Kitchell Stabler 
Judith Lange Fogertey 
Mary Louise Lester 
Ann Mtrriwether Disharoon 
Ann Moser 
Elizabeth Moss 
Deborah Redfield 
Alice Russell 
Nancy Shulze Lamb 
t Sally Stilson Athan 



1951 
27%— $152 
Agnes Bergh Beverley 
Ann Budd Lovell 
Clemency Chase 
Dorothy Colburn 
Barbara Daugherty 
Patricia Driscoll 
Katharine A. Farrar 
Sylvia Finger 
Carolin Furst 
Barbara Gibson 
Paula Holden 
Susan Kimball 
Sally Mason 
Harriette McConnel 
Polly Paradise 
Rosamond Reifsnyder 
Georgia Stanley 
Sylvie Wallace 

1952 
34°/ — $129.50 
Betsy Aldrich 
Martha Artz 
Joan Baird 
Lorna Ball 
Harriett Brown 
Molly Edson 
Jane Edwards Holbrook 
Cynthia Emerson 
Persis Goodnow 
Mary D. Hawes 
Leila Hutchins 
Ethel Kenah 
Janet Leach 
Simone Mathey 
Julia Merriwether 
Clara Reynolds Palmer 
Anne Sanborn 
Sandra V. Smith 
Deborah Snover 
Anna Stefani 

1953 
16%— $571.79 
Class Gift 
Eleanor Edwards 
Julie Gaines 
Mary P. Grant 
Martha Gross 
Carol Hardin 
Martha Schneider 
Ellen Smith 
Audrey Taylor 
Judith K. Wilcox 



1954 
18%— $796.98 
Class Gift 

Louise Marie deCholnoky 
Nancy Donnelly 
Beverly Gramkow 
Betsy Harmon 
Gretchen Kase 
Suzanne Larter 
Patricia Sanborn 
Vicky Schwab 
Nancy-Jean Smith 
Patricia Stainton 
Sylvia Thayer 
Lynn Towner 
Joan Wheeler 

Past Faculty 

J. Hope Baynes 
Helen Bean Juthe 
Adele Bockstedt 
Mrs. A. D. Calhoun 
Mary Carpenter Dake 
Helen Chickering 
Esther Comegys 
Rachel Dowd 
In memory of 
Bertha Grimes Sargent 
Barbara Humes Euston 
Maud C. Morgan 
Virginia Peddle 
Gertrud Rath 
Elizabeth C. Rohrbach 
Justina Ruiz-de-Conde 
Pamela Tinker 
Dorothea Wilkinson 
Agnete Wulff 

Trustees 

J. Radford Abbot 
Philip K. Allen 
Pauline Humeston Carter '27 
Burton S. Flagg 
Helen Allen Henry '32 
Robert I. Hunneman 
Mrs. Wilbur K. Jordan 
Rev. Sidney Lovett 
George F. Sawyer 
Donald B. Smith 
Stoddard M. Stevens, Jr. 
Louise Risley Stever '37 
Gardner Sutton 

Clubs 
New York 
Old Colony 



23 



Changes of Address Since September 1, 1954 



1897 
Locke, Alison N. 

45 Gant St., Kittery, Maine 
1898 
Morton, Anna E. Aff. 

Mrs. Edgar H. Price 

Masonic Homes, Decoto, Calif. 
1900 
Austin, Ethel J. Aff. 

Mrs. Roy L. Grant 

Box 92, Medina, Wash. 
Johnston, Edith B. 

Mrs. Winthrop R. Bliss 

353 South Main St., Wallingford, Conn. 

1901 
Dodge, Lilian E. Aff. 

Mrs. Edwin T. Brewster 

% James Brewster, 9 Dobbs Ter., Scarsdale, 
N. Y. 
Manson, Marion Rogers 

Mrs. Winthrop C. Adams 

90 Commonwealth Ave., Boston 16, Mass. 

1903 
Elliott, Elizabeth Aff. 

Mrs. Herbert L. Tirrell 
Box 3, Plymouth, N. H. 

1905 
Carmichael, Helen S. Aff. 

Mrs. Gilbert T. Sugden 

Granada Court Apts., Venice, Fla. 
Cutler, Frances W. 

Mrs. William S. Knickerbocker 

78 Plainfield St., Waban 68, Mass. 
1908 
Alden, Mary C. Aff. 

Mrs. C. Barton Pratt 

2444 East Verde Lane, Phoenix, Ariz. 
Cole, Marion 

Mrs. J. Burleigh Cheney 

% Mrs. Theodore Goldstone, 1421 Alameda Ave. 
Burbank, Calif. 
Gordon, Olive Aff. 

Mrs. David B. Sherwood 

554 South Main St., Geneva, N. Y. 
Joy, Edith W. Aff. 

Mrs. Reginald W. Murray 

1050 Emerson St., Denver 18, Colo. 



Flynt, Olivia 

1537 Hillcrest Ave. 

Harsh, Alice L. 

2918 Clairmont Ave 



1911 

Winter Park, Fla. 
1913 



Birmingham, Ala. 

1914 
Lumsden, Jessie A. Aff. 

Mrs. Glenwood J. Sherrard 
270 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 
1916 
Freeman, Marjorie 
Mrs. Edson B. Heck 
541 E. 20th St., Apt. 9E, New York 10, N. Y 

1917 
Higgins, Marcia Aff. 

Mrs. Julian Howay 

Mary Esther, Fla. 
Newcomb, Cornelia C. 

Mrs. Clarence L. Lattin 

Oblong Valley Rd., Sharon, Conn. 
1918 
Thomas, Meriel Aff. 

Mrs. Charles N. Bacon 

31 Grove St., Winchester, Mass. 
1920 
Bailey, Eliza C. 

Mrs. Frederic F. Wright 

Orrs Bridge, R. D. 4, Mechanicsburg, Pa. 



Pratt, Lucy B. 

Mrs. Scott V. Rutherford 

1609 Pattengill Ave., Lansing 15, Mich. 
Schwenk, Dorothy Aff. 

Mrs. H. Clark Barrett 

477 Grove St., Upper Montclair, N. J. 
Worman, Margaret 

Mrs. Margaret Thompson 

4 Braeland Ave., Newton Centre 59, Mass. 

1922 
Welborn, Snsana J. 

Mrs. Welborn Osborn 

218 New Beach Blvd., Jacksonville Beach, Fla. 
Whittemore, Elizabeth W. 

30 Bennett Ave., Binghamton, N. Y. 

1924 
Harrington, Elizabeth 

Mrs. James E. Wilson 

21 Brioncliff Dr., Port Washington, N. Y 
Korst, Bessie K. Aff. 

Mrs. Robert B. King 

4721 W. 82nd St., Chicago 29, 111. 
Wallace, Kathryn 

Mrs. William W. Brown 

16 River St., Boston 8, Mass. 
1925 
Quain, Marion 

Mrs. Charles C. Kaiser 

4189 Oakhurst, Mt. View, Calif. 
1926 
Bridgham, Carolyn Aff. 

Mrs. Gilbert L. Ricard 

2703 North Harrison St., Wilmington 2, Del. 
Farwell, Phyllis Aff. 

Mrs. George W. Monaghan 

36 Linden St., Wellesley, Mass. 
Kidder, Sara Aff. 

Mrs. James Borst 

Rt. 4, Box 76, Tucson, Ariz. 
1927 
Burns, Betty Lee 

Mrs. Daniel W. Layman, Jr. 

2049 S. Pacific Blvd., Oceanside, Calif. 
Cutler, Margaret 

Mrs. Clarke Espy 

1818-7th St. W., Billings, Mont. 
Keany, Katharine J. 

730 Anneslie Rd., Baltimore 15, Md. 

1928 
Rundlett, Constance W. 

Mrs. Constance Huston 

303 Oakwood PL, Menlo Park, Calif. 

1929 
Butler, Charlotte 

Mrs. James A. Plummer 

330 St. David's Rd., Wayne, Pa. 
Tobey, Louise 

Mrs. Sterling Dean 

10911 Rochester Ave., W. Los Angeles, Calif. 
Wheeler, Rosamond 

Mrs. Alfred P. Putman 

34 Summer St., Salem, Mass. 

1930 
Dean, Elizabeth C. 

Mrs. Richard B. Ballou 
25 Grant Ave., Highland Park, N. J. 
Ingram, Kathryn Aff. 

Mrs. David N. Rowe 

139 Yen Ping Nau hu, Taipei Farivan, Formosa 

1931 
Gregory, Harriet 

Mrs. Forris W. Norris, Jr. 
1851 Mayfield Ave., Winter Park, Fla. 
Phelps, Katharine A. Aff. 

Mrs. Nelson R. Richardson 
21 Union St., Greenfield, Mass. 



24 



Rogers, Pauline E. 

Mrs. Howard A. Moreen 

44 Bainbridge Rd., W. Hartford, Ct. 
1932 
Cook, Katharine 

Mrs. Kempton S. Howland 

193 Delaware Ave., Elsmere, N. Y. 
Hume, Jean F. 

Mrs. Philip E. Nelbach 

316 Willow St., New Haven, Conn. 
Lathrop, Elizabeth 

Mrs. E. L. Veeder 

R. D. 2, Dalton, Pa. 
Reinhart, Dorothy 

Mrs. R. W. Cornell 

Stanton Rd., Cohassett, Mass. 
Wilhelmi, Julia I. 

Mrs. George L. Lindahl 

Makin Grade, Ross, Calif. 
1933 
Mahoney, Mary C. Aff. 

Mrs. Peyton H. Moss 

103 E. 84th St., Apt. C, New York, N. Y. 
Rogers, Ethel W. 

Mrs. Frank Pierce Foster 

174 Scituate St., Arlington Heights, Mass. 
Sage, Elizabeth R. 

Mrs. Theron Batchelder 

Harvest Lane, Haverford, Pa. 
1935 
Abbot., Priscilla E. 

Mrs. Maurice A. Straub 

1817 Washentaw, Ann Arbor, Mich. 
Heald, Helen 

Mrs. J. F. Rader, Jr. 

518 Woodrow, Columbia, So. Carolina 

1936 
Burns, Sally 

Mrs. John F. Bowen 

14 Wolcott Ave., Andover, Mass. 
Drake, Elizabeth Aff. 

Mrs. Joseph King 

R. F. D. 2, Lockport, N. Y. 
Karnheim, Dorothea A. Aff. 

Mrs. William Eagleson 

34 Brookdale Rd., Natick, Mass. 

1937 
Boynton, Charlotte 

University Hospital, Madison, Wise. 
Collens, Mildred 

Mrs. Henry Laurens, Jr. 

145 Overhill Rd., Salina, Kans. 
Richards, Priscilla 

Mrs. Richard Phenix 

8123 Burholme Ave., Philadelphia 11, Pa. 
Risley, A. Louise 

Mrs. H. Guyford Stever 

16 Edgehill Dr., Belle Haven, Alexandria, Va. 
Rose, Ruth 

Mrs. George S. Stothoff 
34 Leslie Rd., Winchester, Mass. 
Williams, Marjorie L. 
Mrs. William G. Crothers 
343 Tillou Rd., South Orange, N. J. 

1938 
Ailing, Mary Stuart Aff. 

Mrs. Samuel R. Gregg 

281 S. Cantanya, Menlo Pk. Calif. 
Bridge, Beverly Aff. 

Mrs. James H. Moore 

Dunlap Dr.. De Witt, N. Y. 
Brown, Joan 

Mrs. Harold S. Small 

17 Grasshopper Lane, North Scituate, Mass. 
Darling, Susan 

U. S. Embassy, Bern, Switzerland 
Hotchkiss, Patricia 

Mrs. Frederick H. Phelps 

Salmon Rd., Granby, Conn. 
Littauer, Barbara 

Mrs. Mansfield E. Pickett 

Box 238, Great Barrington, Mass. 



Sawyer, Jeanne 

Mrs. John B. Faggi 

South Mountain Rd., New City, N. Y. 
Thayer, Virginia 

Mrs. John B. Boothby 

Marin Town and Country Club, Fairfax, Calif. 
Walworth, Dorothy L. 

Mrs. Francis C. Black 

3912 South Cherokee, Englewood, Colo. 

1939 
Rugg, Audrey 

Mrs. Frank Shanaberg 

358 Brookvale Rd., Smoke Rise, Butler, N. J. 

1940 
Carlson, Joan P. 

Mrs. Lewis R. Hutchison 

9010 Kenton, Skokie, 111. 
Spaulding, Mary 

Mrs. Boiling Powell, Jr. 

Warner Hall, Gloucester Ct. House, Gloucester. 
Va. 

1941 
Brooks, Beverly 

Mrs. Carl F. Floe 

40 Howells St., Belmont, Mass. 
Jones, Doris W. 

Mrs. Roberts G. Hannegan 

1007 N. Kennicott St., Arlington Heights, 111. 
Long, Suzanne 

Mrs. John C. Reed 

Tactical Dept., USMA, West Point, N. Y. 
Martin, Ruth Aff. 

Mrs. Lee J. Guilbeau 

Overbrook Dr., Stamford, Conn. 
Selden, Anne K. 

Wyoming Union, Box 14, Laramie, Wyo. 
Towne, Jane 

Mrs. Richard W. Johnston 

8001 Newdale Dr., Washington 14, D. C. 

1942 
Bertucio, Mary L. M.D. 

17 A Branch St., Boston, Mass. 
Boynton, Mary Margaret 

Mrs. Robert C. MacPherson 

99 Tower Rd., Hingham, Mass. 
Douglas, Miriam M. 

Mrs. Chauncey M. Sanner 

RFD 1, Cumberland, Md. 
Hall, Caroline B. 

Mrs. Lawrence W. Wason 

39 Westledge Rd., RFD, West Simsbury, Conn. 
Ninomiya, Edith 

Mrs. A. Ryce Hopkins 

96 Elm St., Worcester, Mass. 
Sanders, Barbara 

Mrs. Wilton W. Dadmun 

44 Oakridge Ave., Natick, Mass. 
Zeitung, Ann E. 

Mrs. Nathan S. Hale 

Savage St., Storrs, Conn. 

1943 
Feeney, Catherine F. 

Mrs. Joseph P. Flynn 

55 Spindletree Rd., Levittown, Pa. 
Hall, Sylvia Aff. 

Mrs. Dudley T. Colton, Jr. 

479 Hogan Rd., Nashville, Tenn. 
Holden, Joan N. 

Mrs. Joan H. Remy 

511 3rd Ave., New York, N. Y. 
Hoyt, Ann H. 

Mrs. Donald R. Stone 

Taconic Rd., Greenwich, Conn. 
Janssen, Margaret S. Aff. 

Mrs. Joseph R. Gray 

800 Tuckahoe Rd., Yonkers, N. Y. 
Osborne, Polly 

Mrs. P. Dunlap Smith, Jr. 

271 Kaven Way, Bel Hive, Mill Valley, Calif. 
Perkins, Cornelia 

Apt. 301, 236 So. Coronado St.. Los Angeles, Calif- 



25 



Schubert, Jean 

Mrs. Richard C. Acford 
47 High St., Andover, Mass. 
Wiggin, Isabel S. 

Mrs. Frederic C. McDuffie 

60 K Howard Dr., Bergenfield, N. J. 

1944 
Harrison, Shirley Ann Aff. 

Mrs. Walter C. Emmett 

Emerson Rd., Cochituate, Mass. 
Holmes, Cynthia J. 

Mrs. Gregory W. Spurr, Jr. 

Long Hill Rd., Millington, N. J. 
Mastrangelo, Theresa 

Mrs. William A. Mahoney, Jr. 

243 Deerfield Rd., Cranston, R. I. 
Mclvor, Nancy L. 

Mrs. Dwight W. Webb 

600 West 115th St., Apt. 123, New York, N. Y. 
Paradise, Carol 

Verde Valley School, Sedona, Ariz. 
Perkins, Lucy K. Aff. 

Lakeside, Berrien County, Mich. 
Reid, Elizabeth 

Mrs. Jesse M. Buzby, Jr. 

Box 2014, Balboa, Canal Zone 
Stevens, Priscilla 

Mrs. James W. Rutherford 

88 Lincoln St., Englewood, N. J. 
Stone, Nancy 

Mrs. Paul Franklin Heymann 

2591 Charin Rd., Columbus, Ohio 

1945 
Boynton, Martha A. 

Mrs. Robert Pawle 

1214 Arlington West, Larson A. F. Base, Moses 
Lake, Wash. 
Bushnell, Ann C. 

Mrs. Charles W. Bailey, 2nd 

4027 N. Glebe Rd., Arlington, Va. 
Kay, Natalie J. Aff. 

237 Varick Rd., Waban, Mass. 
Livermore, June Aff. 

Mrs. June L. Reid 

73 Dana St., Cambridge, Mass. 
Redman, Janet 

Mrs. Samuel R. Hill, Jr. 

1621 B Valley Ave., Birmingham, Ala. 
Smith, Cynthia H. 

Mrs. John A. McFalls 

4107 42nd Ave., Seattle 5, Wash. 
Spear, Sally 

Mrs. Anthony T. E. Elmendorf 

Ipswich Rd., Topsfield, Mass. 
Welles, Charlotte 

Mrs. Frederic W. Locke 

8 Farrington Ave., Allston, Mass. 

1946 
Clayton, Noma S. 

Mrs. Weston B. Flint 

Dartmouth College, Hanover, N. H. 
Gorham, Frances B. 

Mrs. Theodore Postma, Jr. 

15 Gardner St., Allston 34, Mass. 
Keefer, C. Patricia 

235 West End Ave., New York, N. Y. 
Leinbach, Greta 

Mrs. Alexander Smith, 3rd 

103 Park Rd., Wyomissing, Pa. 
Robertson, Luetta C. 

Mrs. Tor D. Kolflat 

610 Laurel, Wilmette, 111. 
Teeson, Carolyn Martin 

Mrs. Ross S. Keller 

800 Bronx River Rd., Apt. 42 A, Bronxville, N. Y. 
Thomas, Mary (Polly) 

Mrs. Howard D. Peck 

Rt. 1, Matthews, N. C. 
Weldon, Jane A. Aff. 

Mrs. John J. Boland 

4631 Santa Monica Ave., Ocean Beach, Calif. 



EI947 
Carroll, Patricia A. 

Mrs. Richard P. Dunsmore 

5 Rellin Dr., Glen Cove, N. Y. 
Chandler, Margery Anne 

Mrs. Theodore N. Andoniadis 

%Anthony, 19 Valley Rd., Drexel Brook, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 
Clemens, Ann Bowler 

Mrs. Shepard C. Lowman 

Faust — Str. 72, Munich, Germany 
Dimmitt, Nancy Jean Aff. 

50 East 73rd St., New York 21, N. Y. 
Hanly, Corallie 

129 W. 11th St., New York, N. Y. 
Kolins, Joy Lois 

Mrs. Daniel Peisch 

504 W. Brighton Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 
Lyford, Sylvia 

Mrs. Richard B. Morgan 

38 Green Garden, East Haven, Conn. 
Mitchell, Elizabeth A. 

2 Pinehurst Lane, Cincinnati, Ohio 
Sharp, Darlene Alma 

Mrs. Kenneth V. Fiske 

Cold Springs Schoolhouse, Rt. 3, Woodstock, 111. 

1948 
Adkins, Beverley 

Mrs. Hal M. Wells 

4, Rue des Delices, Geneva. Switzerland 
Ball, Martha G. 

Mrs. Harold Jack Geiken 

340 Sheffield, Flint 3, Mich. 
Barnard, Patricia P. 

Mrs. Richard W. Lally 

366 Supply Group, Alexandria Air Force Base 

Alexandria, La. 
Booth, Dorothy Lee 

Mrs. George O. Witwer 

P. O. Box 152, Wallingford, Conn. 
Carroll, Nancy 

Mrs. Holland R. Donan 

397 N. Fullerton Ave., Upper Montclair, N. J. 
Douglass, Nancy 

Mrs. Hugh M. Smith 

611 W. Palmetto St., Florence, So. Carolina 
Elliot, Nancy 

Mrs. Thomas R. Stewart 

92 Laurel Hill Rd., Mountain Lakes, N. J. 
Hawkins, Elizabeth Aff. 

Mrs. Christopher May 

Box 40, Rt. 1, McLean, Va. 
Hughes, Sarah J. 

Mrs. Richard S. Carr, Jr. 

Swedesford Rd., Rt. 1, Ambler, Pa. 
McConnel, Elizabeth S. 

Mrs. Robert F. Barnett, Jr. 

1206 Bethune West, Detroit 2, Mich. 
Richmond, Hannah 

Jaffrey, N. H. 
Robinson, Ann 

Mrs. Jack B. Joyce 

2V 2 Tower Hill Rd., Wickford, R. I. 
Sugar, Barbara 

Mrs. James H. Connor 

1079 South Carringham Rd., Bexley 9, Ohio 

1949 
Bozyan, Elinor 

24 Alexander Sq., London S. W. 3 

England 
Chivers, Ann D. Aff. 

Mrs. Martin H. Stevens 

Old Orchard Farm, Devon, Pa. 
Dartt, Anne B. 

Mrs. William R. Leverich 

10 The Ridge, Plandome, N. Y. 
Mansfield, Anne 

Mrs. William D. Borah 

747 Revere Rd., Yeadon, Pa. 
Miskell, Ann Elizabeth Aff. 

Mrs. Joseph Forand 

21 Crescent St., Springfield, Vt. 



26 



Noss, Lura Jane 

Mrs. Bruce E. Bidwell 

126-B Central Ave., East Hartford, Conn. 
Olney, Madelon E. 

Mrs. M. Robert Paglee 

M.M.A.G. APO 794, % Postmaster, New York 
Oven, Joan 

Mrs. David H. Betts 

464 South Ridge, Lake Forest, 111. 
Stevens, Anne 

Mrs. George R. Bailev, Jr. 

10 Stuyvesant Oval, New York 9, N. Y. 
West, Johanna S. 

2417 Paseo Rd., Colorado Springs, Colo. 
Wyckoff, Kate M. 

Mrs. Hugo L. Lindgren 

502 Anita St., Chula Vista, Calif. 

1950 
Atwood, Cynthia AfF. 

Mrs. Norman W. Couch 

433 Migeon Ave., Torrington, Conn. 
Bixby, Mary 

Mrs. David M. Lamb 

Sweet Hill Rd., Flaistow, N. H. 
Burke, Patricia A. 

Mrs. John M. Wright 

2439 Howe Ave., Columbus, Ga. 
Carter, Alison 

Mrs. John G. Mitchell 

287 Ave. C, Apt. 12 E, New York 1 1 , N. Y. 
Corey, Constance 

Mrs. John M. Lashbrook 

113 Washington St., Williamsburg, Va. 
Gibbon, Roberta A. 

Mrs. Neligh Coates, Jr. 

1917 Henley, Glenview, 111. 
Goodspeed, Elizabeth (Betsy) 

Mrs. Francis D. Fellner 

Stanwich Rd., Greenwich, Conn. 
Lange, Judith M. 

Mrs. Franklyn P. Fogertey, Jr. 

6968 Highway 80 East, El Paso, Texas 
Lindamood, Eleanor Ann 

Mrs. Robert H. Twyford 

700 Kendall Dr., Nashville, Tenn. 
Redfield, Deborah Jane 

100 Dorsey St., Columbia, Mo. 
Russell, Jane W. 

Mrs. Christopher G. Stoneman 

910 Riverside Dr., New York 32, N. Y. 
Sinclaire, Helen Aflf. 

Mrs. Harry E. Blythe, III 

3300 South Union. Alliance, Ohio 
Stilson, Sally Ward 

Mrs. Richard A. Athan 

405 E. Wisconsin Ave., Neenah, Wis. 
Thompson, Eleanor W. Aflf. 

Mrs. E. Arthur Tutein, III 

22 Forest St., Manchester, Conn. 



1951 

Bentley, Nancy L. Aflf. 

Mrs. David A. A. Ridings 

47 Linchlaen St., Cazenovia, N. Y. 
Bergh, Agnes 

Mrs. James M. Beverley, Jr. 

Seward St. Extension, Saratoga Springs, N. Y. 
Eccles, Lydia L. 

3301 Porter St. N. W., Washington, D. C. 
Farrar, Katharine A. 

12 East 64th St., New York 21, N. Y. 
Faulk, Alison Brown 

Mrs. Charles Fowler Curtis 

2019 B No. John Russell Circle, Lynwood Gar- 
dens, Elkins Park, Pa. 
Habsburg, Maria Ileana 

% Mrs. Peabody 

1158 5th Ave., New York, N. Y. 
Paradise, Polly 

Nurses' Residence, 37 Jefferson St., Hartford, 
Conn. 
Randall, Ruth Doane 

Mrs. John F. Motsinger, Jr. 

1457 Le Jeune Rd., Coral Gables, Fla. 
Teasdale, Merilyn 

Mrs. Charles L. Abbott 

694 Broad St., East Weymouth, Mass. 
Webster, Audrey Lawrence Aflf. 

353 East 84th St., New York, N. Y. 
Wheeler, Mary Macy 

Mrs. Gardner D. Shepard 

1724 E.O.V. Ave., Apt. 6, Norfolk, Va. 

1952 
Allen, Nancy Aflf. 

4818 Woodway Lane, Washington, D. C. 
Kenah, Ethel M. Aflf. 

Brighton Manor, R. D. 2, Beaver, Pa. 
Leach, Janet 

Blue Horizons, Thetford Hill, Vt. 
Mathey, Simone May 

192 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 
Nichols, Barbara Taft Aflf. 

Mrs. William G. Kurth 

Vincent Apt., Apt. 3-D, Vincent Rd., Bronxville, 
N. Y. 

Past Faculty 

Grassi, Mrs. Robert 

54 Brooks St., Arlington, Mass. 
Peddle, Virginia W. 

172 Highland Rd., Rye, N. Y. 
Sainati, Mrs. Edward (Jupp, Marguerite) 

Webster House, Court St., Exeter, N. H. 
Spurway, Mary Lander 

Mrs. Robert Enlow 

1024 Santa Barbara Rd., Pine Hills, Orlando, 
Fla. 
Stanhope, Barbara M. 

Lincoln School, Providence, R. I. 



27 



3u fHrmnrtam 



1883 

Harriet W. May died recently in Berkeley, 
California. 

1898 

Marion L. Wood died December 16, 1954, 
in Andover. 

1902 

Mabel K. Bennett (Mrs. Thomas A. 
Church) died recently in Shaker Heights, 
Ohio. 

1903 

Jean David (Mrs. Joseph H. Blunt) died 
October 15, 1954, in Andover. Our sincere 
sympathy is extended to her daughter, 
Katherine Blunt Polsby '29. 

1910 

Roselle S. Harlow (Mrs. John C. Marble) 
died July 29, 1953. 



1912 



Hazel Amelia Dodge died September 8,! 
1954, in Sunbury, Pa. 

1915 

Martha Lamberton (Mrs. J. Harold Os- 
mer) died October 6, 1954, in Oakland, 
California, after a long illness. 

1926 

Jean Harriet Fleming (Mrs. Dixon H. 
Smith) died August 3, 1954, after a long 
illness. 

Past Faculty 

Miss Dorothy Duff, resident nurse at 
Abbot from 1941-1948, died June 3, 1954, 
after a long illness. 

Miss Marie Nichols, former violin in- 
structor, died November 20, 1954, in New-; 
ton, Mass. 



Class News 



1878 

Ethel Bolton Todd, whose death occurred 
on January 16, 1954, was at the time of her 
death one of Abbot's oldest alumnae. Her 
home was in St. Stephen, New Brunswick, 
where she was greatly beloved and well 
known from her activity in public life when 
her husband was Lieutenant Governor of 
New Brunswick. She is survived by two 
daughters, Mrs. Winifred Todd Mills '00. 
and Mrs. Mildred Todd Brown '09. Both 
Mrs. Mills and Mrs. Brown live in St. 
Stephen, N. B. 

1887 

Angie Dunlon Purrington is living with 
her daughter in Kentucky. 

1889 

Our sincere sympathy is extended to 
Alice Joy Arms whose daughter, Elizabeth, 
died last September in Newfoundland. 

1897 

The class extends its sympathy to Bessie 
Stow Twichell whose husband died Sept. 27, 
1954, in New Britain, Conn. 

1900 

Rose-Ann Day Keep, whose husband, 
Robert Porter Keep, is the retired principal 



of Farmington, continues to live in the town 
of Farmington. Her interests are still in the 
well-known school, Farmington, now, like 
Abbot, in her Second Century. 

Ethel Hazen Lillard writes of a busy fall 
life in the lovely little town of Cohasset. I 
Her husband, Walter K. Lillard, former 
headmaster of Tabor Academy, is director 
of Civil Defense in Cohasset. 

Edith Johnston Bliss has left her home in 
Vermont and she and Mr. Bliss are now! 
located in Wallingford, Conn. Edith has the 
distinction of being the first great-grand- 
mother in the class. A great-granddaughter, 
Jennifer, was born in September. 

Winifred Todd Mills is wintering in St. 
Petersburg, Fla. 

Alice Wood Hodgdon is spending the 
winter in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. She is 
considering taking a garden tour to Eng- 
land, Holland, Belgium, and France in the 
spring. 

1905 

The class extends its sympathy to Mabel 
Wardwell Newell whose husband died sudden-' 
ly last September while returning from 
work. Mr. Newell was credit manager at 
Raymond's in Boston. 



28 



1906 

Constance Parker Chipman's son-in-law. 
Edmund Keville, has been named Judge 
of the Suffolk Probate Court in Massa- 
chusetts. 

1907 

Gladys Dudley Stephan is an authority on 
flower arrangements, and an article about 
her arrangements appeared recently in the 
New Haven Register. 

The class will be sorry to learn that Anna 
May Richards Folsom's husband died sudden- 
ly of a heart attack last October. Her son, 
Henry, has gone into the ministry and is now 
studying at Berkeley Episcopal Seminary 
in New Haven. Anna May reports that she 
has eight grandchildren. Her youngest 
daughter teaches young scientists in Los 
Alamos, New Mexico. 

1908 

The class extends its sympathy to Marion 
Towle Sturgis whose husband died of acute 
leukemia in November. 

1909 

Mary Bell Gilbert McBride is living with 
her daughter, Betty, in Dallas, Tex. Mary 
Bell has been quite ill. 

The class extends its sympathy to Helen 
Weber Mitchell whose husband died recently. 

1910 

Ethel Reigeluth Darby and her husband 
were in Cape Town, South Africa, at Christ- 
mas. They have already traveled 65,000 
miles by air and motor, and have visited 
seventeen different countries in their world 
tour. Some of the highlights of their trip 
have been visiting by air isolated cattle sta- 
tions in Australia; having a boat trip on the 
Inland Sea and living for a time in a Jap- 
anese house; flying to Daryeeling while in 
India; spending a month in Kashmir on a 
house boat; viewing Victoria Falls; and 
finally, going on safari to Serrengetti Plains 
where they saw black-maned lions and 
"shot" much wild game "with their cam- 
eras." 

The class extends its sympathy to Eleanor 
Couch Cook whose husband died very sud- 
denly last September of a heart attack. 

1911 

The class extends its sympathy to Mar- 
garet Strong Hill whose mother died last 
November. 



1914 

The November appeal for the Gymnasium 
Fund brought some nice contributions from 
1914 and some very nice Christmas greet- 
ings and news to a grateful class secretary. 

Marion Clark Myerscough's husband, who 
had been commander of the U.S.W.V.'s of 
Texas for two years, got Marion interested 
too and she served two years as president 
and two as treasurer — but doesn't like try- 
ing to collect money! She is interested in the 
gymnasium project in view of her sister's 
vital interest and interesting career in the 
field of Physical Education (Lydia Clark 
deceased 1906 — professor and author at 
Columbus, Ohio). 

Rosamond Gens Lehnert, who was in and 
out of the hospital four times during the 
year, has enjoyed the building of a new 
home — a ranch-type house on Leslie Lake. 
She and her husband are busy planting and 
beautifying it as a permanent home: 441 1 - 
28th Ave., N., St. Petersburg. They stayed 
there all summer with the aid of air-condi- 
tioning and this winter her nephew is staying 
with the Lehnerts and attending St. Peters- 
burg Junior College. Rosamond's avocation 
is still writing poetry as we, who were at 
our 40th reunion, remember so well. 

It was a real joy to hear at long last from 
Gladys Higgins. She has never been able 
to return to Abbot, having had continuous 
illness in her family. Gladys retired a few 
years ago from teaching owing to rheumatoid 
arthritis. Her Christmas card said she had 
not been out of the house since before Christ- 
mas 1953, and had been in bed now for seven 
weeks owing to an acute attack likely to last 
three to six months. Surely no 1914'er will 
miss calling on Gladys if she is anywhere near 
Rockport — 11 Phillips Street! And do write 
her! She likes the news the Bulletins bring 
and your greetings would mean so much to a 
shut-in. 

Marion Middlebrook York reports that she 
has three grandsons and one granddaughter 
who are the children of her daughter, Sally. 

Margaret. Wylie Ware spent Christmas 
with her grandchildren at Norwalk, Cali- 
fornia, but sent us a snapshot taken at 
her favorite spot in La Jolla. (This will be 
added to our scrapbook — and we need more 
from more of you!) Jack, her son, is still in 
Korea. 



29 



1916 

Vera L. Allen led a city-wide meeting 
held in Boston recently in the interest of en- 
larging the Boston Weekday Religious Edu- 
cation Program. 

The class extends its sympathy to Mildred 
Jenkins Dalrymple whose mother died 
January 15. 

1918 

We have just learned that Meriel Thomas 
Preston was married Feb. 20, 1954, to 
Charles N. Bacon of Winchester. 

1919 

Mildred Frost Eaton's son, James H., Ill, 
was married in December to Nancy Nelb of 
North Andover. 

1921 

Marian Ailing Bradley writes that she 
became a grandmother last May when Lu- 
cinda Cowles Dwight was born to her 
daughter, Margaret. Marian's son, Otis, 
graduated from Yale last June, and is now 
studying at Columbia Law School. Her 
daughter, Marian, is at Bryn Mawr, and 
her youngest son, Michael, is at Deerfield. 

1922 

Katherine Damon Kletzien's younger 
daughter, Phyllis, was married to Edward F. 





Jacqueline and Roland Marsh, children of 
Dorothy Beeley Marsh '25. 



Mary Alice, David, Nancy, and Ruth Mer- 
cer, children of Beatrice Lane Mercer '28. 

Campbell, Sept. 4, 1954. Her husband is 
studying at McCormick Theological Semin- 
ary in Chicago. 

Olive Howard Vance writes: "The first 
child of each of our children is a big event, 
so I don't see how I missed announcing the 
birth of Deborah Jean, to our son, Peter, 
and his Barbara, on August 8, 1954. Maybe 
it was because I spent most of July on a 
ladder painting the outside of the house!" 

1923 

Elizabeth Flagg Dow's husband, Sterling, 
who is Hudson Professor of Archaeology at 
Harvard, is giving a series of lectures at 
the Lowell Institute entitled, "New Factors 
in the Oldest Greek History." 

1924 

Ruth Pritchard de Rivera's son, Joseph, an 
ensign in the Navy Medical Corps Service, 
was married in September to Margaret 
Rigdon of Richland, Wash. 

The class will be sorry to learn that Con- 
stance Twichell's father died last September 

1926 

Katharine Clay Sawyer writes, "Charlie 
is on sabbatical leave to lecture for five 
weeks at Salzburg Seminar in American 
Studies. We sail Jan. 26 for Paris and go 
directly to Salzburg. We make our next 
headquarters at the American Academy in 
Rome for two months. We will travel for a 
month and will be up around London from 
June to end of August where Charlie expects 
to do some work." 



30 



L 




Jean, Murray, and Robert Kirkpatrick, 
children of Elizabeth Inman Kirkpatrick '37. 

Virginia Merritt Helfferich's husband is on 
leave from the E. and R. church to the 
World Council of Churches. They returned 
in December from two months in India and 
Pakistan, and left in January for Hawaii, 
Tokyo, Hongkong, Ceylon, Java, Indonesia, 
Burma, and Formosa. 

1928 

Beatrice Lane Mercer's daughter, Nancy, 
will graduate in June from Bouve as a physi- 
cal therapist. Her daughter, Mary Alice, 
graduated from Virginia Intermont last 
May and is now attending Marjorie Web- 
ster Junior College in Washington where 
she is president of the Freshman class. Her 
engagement to Roland Jeffries of Arlington, 
Va., was announced recently. 

1929 

Polly Francis Loesch's husband has re- 
signed as minister in Melrose, and is now min- 
ister and secretary to the Chaplains and 
Armed Forces Personnel of the Congrega- 
tional Christian Churches of America. 

Married 
Rosamond Wheeler to Alfred Porter Put- 
nam, Oct. 13, 1954, in Salem, Mass. 

1930 

Elizabeth Perry Lewis writes that she and 
her family are back in the United States for 
a time. Her husband is working at Cornell, 
and in February will go on a lecture tour 
for the International Committee of the 
Y.M.C.A. They expect to return to Mexico 
in the summer. 



1936 

We learned recently that Dorothy Karn- 
heim was married to William Eagleson. 
Born 

To Eleanor Wells Nudd, a second son, 
Walter Arnold, Nov. 8, 1954. 

1937 

Bunny Risley Stever's husband is chief 
scientist of the Air Force in Washington. 

Born 
To Lucy Hulburd Richardson, a daughter, 
Lucy, Dec. 13, 1954. 

1938 

Beverly Bridge Moore accompanied her 
husband on a business trip to England, 
Germany, Switzerland, and France last 
spring. 

1939 

Mary Koch Danos writes: "We've had a 
wonderful year, generally speaking, and 
hope that you have, too. The little French 
community of Vaucresson is still very much 
part of our daily lives, but we rediscovered 
this summer how intensely American we 
all are. 

"Acting on a quick decision, we welcomed 
1954 in Luxemburg, a thoughtful sedate 
little country of deep ravines and ancient 
castles which grow out of the cliffs. We were 
impressed by the quiet friendliness of the 
people, and the way they all seemed to know 
each other. From Luxemburg we drove to 
Dusseldorf to visit friends, then back 
through the Ardennes forests in a picture- 
book snow storm. 

"After the customary spring epidemics, we 
left France in mid-June and flew to Saint 
Paul via London and New York. Cherrie's 




Roy Risley, Sara, Margo, and Guyford 
Stever, children of Louise Risley Stever '37. 



3 1 



mother had quite an international gathering 
staying with her at White Bear Lake, with 
us from Paris and cousin Truus Koch who 
was there from The Hague. 

"July was beautiful, if frantically busy, 
what with Peter's work, shopping for an- 
other two-year supply for essentials, and 
seeing as many of our Twin City friends as 
humanly possible. 

"Early in August we left Minnesota in our 
unimpeachable Land Cruiser. We stopped 
in Milwaukee, Lansing, London and Brant- 
ford, Ontario, Buffalo, Boston and New 
York. 

"We sailed on the Queen Elizabeth Septem- 
ber 1st: we had a very relaxing crossing. 

"Then there was our arrival, Peggy's ton- 
silectomy, unpacking and the girls' starting 
school, all within three weeks. Peter con- 
tinues his work with Minnesota de France, 
and there is a never-ending variety of 
pleasant things for us to do together on 
week ends." 

Born 

To Barbara Lei and Pearson, a second 
child and first daughter, Sally Leland, Oct. 
13, 1954. 

1940 

The class will be sorry to learn that 
Dorothy Schwiebert Gardner has been in the 
Schenectady City Hospital since October 
with polio. She was in an iron lung for 
seven weeks, and it will probably be another 
year before she leaves the hospital. Best 
wishes for continued improvement, Dotty. 

Mary Spaulding Powell is living at Warner 
Hall, a 600-acre plantation on the Severn 
River near Yorktown. She and her husband 
are raising Black Angus cattle and small 
grains. She writes, "It is a wonderful life, 
and we love it!" 

Libby Travis Soilenberger writes that 
Gus is still in the Navy, and has been or- 
dered to the Pentagon for two years. They 
have their first house, after fourteen various 
apartments, with lots of room for boys, dogs. 
Hammond organs, and anyone from Abbot 
who is passing through! Robin and Richard 
are 9 and 4, and the only thing around they 
can't outwit is Mike, the Irish setter. 

Marcia Wheeler Falconer writes that she 
has three children, Sandra, 8, Steven, 4, 
and Peter, 6 months. 

Born 

To Nadene Nichols Lane, a fourth child 



and first daughter. Nadene Nichols, Sept. 
29, 1954. 

1941 
Married 
Suzanne Long Kremer to Captain John 
Charles Reed, USAF, Dec. 8, 1954, in the 
Old Cadet Chapel, West Point, N. Y. Capt. 
Reed attended the Braden School, Corn- 
wall, N. Y., Lafayette College, and grad- 
uated in 1949 from the United States Mili- 
tary Academy where he is now assigned to 
the Department of Tactics. Capt. Reed 
flew 52 missions over North Korea, and was 
twice awarded the Distinguished Flying 
Cross and the Bronze Star. 

Born 

To Jeannette Biart Warren, a third 
daughter, Elizabeth Scott, Sept. 29, 1954. 
Jeannette's other daughters are Sally, 6, and 
Suzanne, 4. 

To Mary Elizabeth Erkert Altorfer, a 
daughter, Laura Joan, Nov. 4, 1954. Mary 
Elizabeth has three sons, Stephen, 9, Danny, 
6, and Robert, 3. 

To Frances Troub Roberts, a second 
daughter, Priscilla Jane, Jan. 3, 1955. 

To Martha Tyer Curtis, a son, Benjamin 
Tver, Nov. 23, 1954. 




Gary, Tommy, and Lucy McDonough, 
children of Joan Belden McDonough '41. 



32 




James, Harriet, and Sarah Beale, children 
f Margaret Stuart Beale '42. 

1942 

1st Lt. Margaret McFarlin is now serving 
in England with the U.S. Army Air Force. 

Marilyn Menschik Westaway lives on a 
700-acre farm in Virginia. She and her 
husband are raising sheep and cattle, and 
she writes there is never a dull moment. 

Born 

To Betsey Fowler Warrick, a third child 
and second son, Douglas Carleton, March 3, 
1954. 

1943 

Catherine Feeney Flynn has just moved 
into a new home. She has three boys, Joe, 
Jr., 514 Tom, V/ 2 , and Michael, 2. Her 
husband is director of Industrial and Labor 
Relations with Kaiser Metal Products. 



Born 

To Helen Barss Schneider, a son, John 
(Daniel, Jan. 1, 1955. 

To Sylvia Hall Colton, a second child and 
(first daughter, Deborah Gay, May 14, 1954. 
Sylvia's husband is now sales representative 
jbr Johns-Manville in Nashville, Tenn. 
They have bought a home, and hope to 
hettle down there for a couple of years. 

To Betty-Lou Monett Hess, a son, Louis 
Edward, Nov. 18, 1954. 

To Cynthia Teel Vail, a third child and 
;econd daughter, Martha Yeiser, June 10, 
H954. Cynthia writes that she has been ill 
for a year. Her husband is director of 
Psychiatric Education for Mentally Re- 
garded Children at Rosewood State Train- 
ling School. 

1944 

Carol Paradise is teaching Spanish at the 
|v 7 erde Valley School in Sedona, Ariz. She 
also conducts students on field trips to 
Mexico and to the Indian Reservations. 



Betty Reid Buzby's husband, who is with 
Esso has been transferred to Panama, and 
is manager of the Canal Zone Company. 

Born 

To Nancy Baylor Little, a fifth child and 
third daughter, Marcia Woodruff, Dec. 5, 
1954. 

To Shirley Ann Harrison Emmett, a third 
child and second son, Scott Harrison, 
Nov. 26, 1954. 

To Frances MacDonald Thompson, a 
second child and first son, Robert Torrev, 
Nov. 12, 1954. 

To Martha Watkins Curry, a third daugh- 
ter, Sarah, Oct. 2, 1954. 

1945 

We have just learned that Jean Bunten is 
married to Charles F. Kirby, Jr. 

A story entitled "Where is Mrs. For- 
stein?", and written by Mary Jane Hodges 
appeared in the September issue of Coronet. 
Mary Jane, who is now on a world tour, 
worked for Coronet and Esquire until she re- 
signed last May for her present trip. 

Sally Leavitt Cheney and her husband are 
on leave, and are in Saxton's River, Vt. 

Janet Redman Hill writes that her husband 
is an assistant professor of Medicine at the 
University of Alabama. 

Does anyone know Bee Van Cleve Lee's 

address If so, please send it to the Alumnae 

Office. -a 

Born 

To Elizabeth Marsh Birney, a third son, 

Reed McDowell, Sept. 11, 1954. 




Jeffrey and Jill Elizabeth Atwood, children 
of Margaret Travis Atwood '44. 



33 




f Hilary Paterson_ Cleveland '45, her husband 
and children, Cotton, Jake, and David. 

1946 

Sally Allen Waugh's husband is the New 
York representative of the Pendleton Woolen 
Company of Portland, Oregon. 

Greta Leinbach Smith writes that she and 
her family are moving to their first house in 
suburban Reading, Pa. Her husband has a 
new job, and she has a year-old daughter, 
Sandra. 

Married 

Jane Weldon to Ensign John J. Boland of 
Bradford, Mass., Nov. 11, 1954. Cornelia 
Weldon '53 was maid of honor. Ens. Boland 
is a graduate of Merrimack College, and is 
on active duty with the United States Naval 
Reserve. 

Born 

To Barbara Barnard Clement, a second 
child and first daughter, Oct. 15, 1954. 

To Jennv Copeland Dufford, a daughter, 
Tedron Ann, Nov. 12, 1954. 

To Margaret Howe Ewing, a second 
daughter, Anne Ashton, Nov. 9, 1954. 

To Sally Power Hansman, a son, Robert 
John, Jr., Oct. 13, 1954. 

1947 

Christine von Goeben Curtis sailed last 
November on a troop ship for Tokyo. Her 
husband has been reassigned from Korea to 
Tokyo, and they expect to be there for a 
year-and-a-half. 

Engaged 

Suzanne Robbins to Bradford Colt de- 
Wolf of Washington, D. C. Mr. deWolf pre- 
pared at St. Albans School in Washington 
and attended Massachusetts Institute of 



Technology. He served as a second lieu- 
tenant in Korea from 1950-1953. 
Married 

Darlene A. Sharp to Kenneth V. Fiske, 
Oct. 23, 1954, in Chicago, 111. Darlene 
writes, "After a trip east (and it was so 
good to see that lovely country again!] jl 
we're settling into a farm life in Woodstock, 
111., just northeast of Chicago in beautiful, 
rich farming country. Ken owns and oper- 
ates the^Fiske Farm Advisory Service, and 
farms his family's farm. One of his side 
interests is in television. He is the farm ad- 
visor and appears on an NBC network 
production called "Out on the Farm" 
which has been on the air since last summer 
and has been very favorably received (broke 
all records on its mail poll) . His family and i 
mine are old friends: he used to live in 
Beverly Hills so I'd known him before, bui 
we became re-acquainted down at NBC 
last spring. I was working there as art 
assistant director on Zoo parade, severa; 
soap operas, Welcome Travelers, etc. 

"We're remodelling an old schoolhousi \ 
(100 years old) — hope to be in it by Christ j 
mas. This farm life is like a resort; everyone, 
in Chicago it seems remembers us on sunrr<| 
Sundays and drives out to spend the day 
Our attractions are many; we've got 
beautiful trout stream and we can guarante 
a good catch — pheasants swarm over th 
farm so hunting season finds us crowded an< 
hectic. There is riding, buggy riding (w 
drive in our "surrey with the fringe on top : 
to church) and any other kind of indoor o 
outdoor sport you want. If Ken can get th 
show sold we will really "live it up": w 
travel all over for NBC research for th 
show. Know any interesting farms?" 

Born 

To Ann Clemens Lowman, a son, Shepar 
Michael, Dec. 25, 1954, in Munich, Gei 
many. 

To Nancy Hamilton Eglee, a second chil 
and first daughter, Katharine Read, Sep 
17, 1954. 

To Jane Lewis Gleason, a third child an 
second daughter, Susan Ann, Oct. 23, 195- 

1948 

Engaged 
Helen Tasche to Cecil Jackson North Jrj 
of Hewlett, Long Island, N. Y. Mr. North i 
a graduate of Milton Academy and Princij 



34 



[on \52. He served as a lieutenant in the 
field artillery in Korea and is attending 
Harvard Business School. 

Married 
Lisa Hawkins to Lieut. Christopher May, 
kjSNR, of Rochester, N. Y., Nov. 13, 1954. 
Lt. May attended the Harley School in 
[Rochester, and was graduated cum laude 
(from Harvard in 1951. He is stationed in 
J Washington. 

Josephine Hildreth to Humayun Mir/.a 
lol Karachi, Pakistan, Oct. 23, 1954. Mr. 
IjMirza attended Doon School, Dehra Dun, 
hand the Chartered Insurance Institute, 
London. He is with the Alliance Assurance 
| [Company of London at Karachi. 
Born 
To Mary Marton Davenport, a second son, 
■William Brough, Nov. 2, 1954. Mary's 
i other son is 19 months old. Her husband re- 
llceived his B.S. in Mechanical Engineering 
lat MIT last June, and is now working on 
Ibis M.S. 

To Betty McConnel Barnett, a daughter, 
Katherine Pinkerton, April 28, 1954. 
[Betty's husband is serving his internship at 
lithe Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit. 

1949 

Born 
To Ann Chivers Stevens, a son, John Guil- 
jford Lawrence, Aug. 19, 1954. 

To Anne Mansfield Borah, a son, Brewster 
{Mansfield, Sept. 10, 1954. 

To Wendy Scott Scott, a daughter, 
Judith Marion, Sept. 5, 1954. 

1950 

Noelle Blackmer writes: 

"I got such a kick out of receiving the 
[Bulletin over here, that I thought I could 
[hest reciprocate by sending you some of my 
pews. I graduated in June from Radcliffe 
[with a B.A. (cum laude) in English. For 
[three weeks after vacation I toured the LT.S. 
[with 25 members of the Radcliffe Choral 
[Society and 25 members of the Harvard 
[Glee Club. We had a fantastic trip, stopping 
lin various cities across the country and then 
[working our way down the West Coast from 
(Seattle to Los Angeles. San Francisco, Las 
iVegas and Denver were some of the other 
jhigh spots — not to mention the Tanglewood 
Festival where we sang Berlioz' Damnation of 
[Faust with the Boston Symphony Orchestra. 




Debby Leigh Wansker, daughter of Caro- 
lyn England Wansker '48. 

"In September I took off for France, where 
I am now employed by the French Govern- 
ment as an assistant in English language in a 
French public school. It is a wonderful ex- 
perience for me, for I am learning a lot of 
French, even if I am not successful in teach- 
ing English to French girls! I'd love to see 
anyone who is planning to head this way — 
care of American Express in Paris will al- 
ways reach me." 

Toddy Huberth is attending the New 
York School of Social Work. 

Engaged 

Nora Johnson to Leonard Siwek of Chi- 
cago. Mr. Siwek is a graduate of North- 
western University, the School of Advanced 
International Studies in Washington and 
studied at the School of Oriental Studies in 
Cairo. He is a member of the Government 
Relations Staff of the Arabian American 
Oil Co. 

Married 

Cynthia Atwood to Norman W. Couch, 
May 22, 1954. 

Betsy Goodspeed to Francis Dale Fell- 
ner of Westport, Conn., Oct. 23, 1954. Mr. 
Fellner was graduated from Proctor Acade- 
my and the United States Merchant Marine 
Academy at Kings Point, L. 1. Jane Gajill 
Towner, Mary Alice Dodge Bailey, and Joan 
Aldrich were bridesmaids. 

Mary Jane Greenwald to Peter Jakobson, 
Nov. 27, 1954, in New York. Mr. Jakobson, 
a World War II Navy veteran, is a graduate 
of New York University. 

Jane W r yatt Russell to Christopher Greek 
Stoneman, Dec. 20, 1954, in W T oodstock. 
Vt. Mr. Stoneman, who served with the 



35 



Indian Army, was graduated from Cam- 
bridge University. He is on the faculty of 
the Buckley School, New York. 
Born 

To Patricia Burke Wright, a son, John B., 
June 21, 1954. 

To Eleanor Thompson Tutein, a daughter, 
Jennifer L., Oct. 24, 1954. 

1951 

We have just learned that Agnes Bergh 
was married to James M. Beverley, Jr., in 
1953. Mr. Beverley sells and manufactures 
slippers. They have a son, Michael, born 
May 19, 1953. 

Minola Habsburg is working with Bishop 
Sheen in New York City. 

Georgia Stanley is studying at the Perry 
Kindergarten School in Boston. 

Fay White is working in Lord and Tay- 
lor's in New York. 

Married 

Merilyn Teasdale to Charles Lincoln 
Abbott, June 12, 1954. Mr. Abbott is a 
senior at Boston University. Frances Rus- 
sell was maid of honor. 

Sarah-Jane Mason to Second Lieutenant 
Howard Gardner Crowell, Jr., Feb. 19, 1955, 
in Fairfield, Conn. Lieutenant Crowell is a 
graduate of St. Georges's School, Newport, 
R. L, and St. Lawrence University. 

1952 

Janet Leach is secretary to the Aloha 
Camps. 

Judy Merriwether is working as a student 
assistant in the Department of Music at 
Randolph-Macon. She is in the Glee Club 
and the Spanish Club. She is also playing 
in the string ensemble. 

Debby Snover took part in the Wellesley 
Junior class presentation. 

Margery Webb has transferred to the Uni- 
versity of Colorado. 



Engaged 
Betsy Aldrich to Robert E. Stewart, 
USA, of Sanford, N. C. Mr. Stewart studied 
at Elon College, North Carolina, and is now 
stationed at Fort Jackson, S. C. 

Married 
Elizabeth Griffiths to Frederic McCurdy 
of Jenkintown, Pa., Dec. 27, 1954, in New 
York City. Mr. McCurdy is a graduate of 
Tufts College, and is a second lieutenant in 
the Air Force. 

Born 
To Jane Edwards Holbrook, a son, Eugene 
Edward, Jr., last spring. 

1953 

Julie Gaines has transferred to Skidmore 
College. 

Connie Weldon had an article entitled, 
"Rehabilitation: Kitchens and Canes", 
published in The Pilot, the weekly newspaper 
of the Boston archdiocese. The article told 
the story of rehabilitation work with the 
blind. 

Engaged 

Margit Andersson to Timothy R. Clifford 
of Seattle, Wash. Mr. Clifford, a member of 
Berkeley College, will graduate from Yale in 
June. 

Mary P. Grant to Pvt. Robert Upjohn 
Redpath 3d, of South Orange, N. J. Pvt. 
Redpath is a graduate of Deerfield Academy 
and Yale. 

1954 

Betsy Harman has transferred to Mar- 
jorie Webster Junior College in Washington, 
D. C. 

Engaged 

Jane Munro to Charles William Barrett 
of Melrose. Mr. Barrett was graduated from 
Hebron Academy and is now a junior at 
Dartmouth College. 



36 



\9l Attot fyp-ta-dcUe, 
\AL(uU you? 

If not, please send a news bulletin to the Alumnae Office before April 20, 1955. 



Today's date 

Maiden Name 

[Married Name 

'Address 

Postal Zone 



s,-^ 




Sent by the School to all Abbot Girls 




AJbbot Academy Bulletin 

May 1955 



ABBOT ACADEMY BULLETIN 



Series 22 



MAY, 1955 



Issue 3 



Abbot Academy Alumnae Association 

Associate Member of the American Alumni Council 



President 
Miss Irene Atwood 

180 Commonwealth Ave. 
Boston 16, Mass. 

Vice-Presidents 
Mrs. Edmund W. Nutting 
(Mary Howard) 
21 Wave Ave. 
Wakefield, Mass. 

Miss Dorothy Taylor 
118 Elgin Street 
Newton Centre 59, Mass. 

Mrs. A. Lawrence Van Wart 
(Betty Weaver) 
160 Melrose Place 

Ridgewood, N. J. 



OFFICERS— 1 954- 1 956 

Clerk 
Mrs. Robert C. Holland 
(Barbara Healey) 
211 Chestnut Street 
Andover, Mass. 

Treasurer 
Mrs. Lawrence D. Bragg, Jr. 
(Mary Dooley) 
Alden Road 
Andover, Mass. 

General Secretary 
Miss C. Jane Sullivan 
97 Knox Street 
Lawrence, Mass. 



Alumnae Trustees 
1951-1957 
Mrs. H. Guyford Stever 
(Louise Rislev) 
16 Edgehill Dr., BelleHaven 
Alexandria, Va. 

1954-1960 
Mrs. Herbert P. Carter 
(Pauline Humeston) 
163 Glenwood Road 
Englewood, N. J. 



ABBOT CLUB PRESIDENTS 



BOSTON 
Mrs. John L. Simonds 
(Mary Trafton) 
3 Kennedy Road 
Cambridge 38, Mass. 

CHICAGO 

Mrs. Floyd Shumway 

(Margaret Rabling) 

815 East Deer path 

Lake Forest, Illinois 

CONNECTICUT 
Mrs. Donald Hoggson 
(Gertrude Druminond) 
R.F.D. 
Lakeville, Conn. 

DETROIT 
Mrs. Howard H. Fitzgerald 
(Jean Craig) 
19091 Bedford Road 
Birmingham, Mich. 



MAINE, EASTERN 
Mrs. John White 
(Margaret O'Leary) 
3 Wilson Park 
Waterville, Maine 

MAINE, WESTERN 
Mrs. Frank N. Wells 
(Louise Houghton) 
32 Ship Channel Road 
South Portland, Maine 

NEW YORK 

President 
Mrs. Lucien R. Tharaud 
(Cynthia James) 
1 7 East 96th Street 
New York 28, N. Y. 



OHIO. CENTRAL 
Mrs John B. Gager 
(Thehna Mazey) 
228 N. Drexel Avenue 
Columbus 9, Ohio 

OHIO, CLEVELAND 
Mrs. Jerry L. Mercer 
(Mollv Hubbard) 
19560 Telbir Ave. 
Rocky River 16, Ohio 

OLD COLONY 

Mrs. James T. Cottrell 
(A. Louise Thompson) 
372 Madison Street 
Fall River, Mass. 



THE EDITORIAL BOARD 

Jane B. Carpenter, 1892, honorary 
Constance Parker Chipman, 1906, honorary 
C.Jane Sullivan. 1931, Editor-in-Chief 
Irene Atwood, 191 8, ex officio 



Published four times yearly. October, February. May, and September, by Abbot Acad- 
emy, Andover, Massachusetts. 

Entered as second class matter December 12, 1933.. at the post office at Andover, Mass- 
achusetts, under the act of August 24, 191 2. 



Spring Calendar 

Apr/1 5 School reopened after Spring vacation 
April () Tea Dance for Preps and Juniors 

Illustrated lecture by Thomas J. Corgan - "Beauties and 
Beasts" 
April w Vespers — Easter Music by the Choir 
April 16 Movie at Abbot 

April i J Two-piano concert by Miss Friskin and Mr. Coon 
April 24 Vespers — The Reverend Sidney Lovett, D.D., Chaplain of 

Yale University 
April 30 Mozart's Bastien and Bastienna by the Fidelio Society 
May 1 Vespers — The Reverend Roy L. Minich, D.D., First Church of 

Maiden 
May 7 Alumnae Day 

Bazaar 
May 8 Vespers — The Reverend Allen W. Clark, Calvary Church, 

Danvers 
May 15 Vespers — The Reverend Alexander St. Ivanyi, D.D., The 

First Church of Christ, Lancaster, Massachusetts 
May 21 Dance-Group Recital 
May 22 Student Recital 
May 28 Movie at Abbot 
May 2g Vespers — The Reverend Raymond Calkins, D.D., Pastor 

Emeritus, First Church in Cambridge 
May jo- June 2 Final Examinations 
June 3 Student Government Chapel 



The One Hundred Twenty-Sixth Commencement 

June j Rally Night 

June 4 Last Chapel, 9:30 a.m. 

Garden Party, 4:00-6:00 p.m. 

Draper Dramatics, 8 p.m. 
June 5 Baccalaureate at 10:45 a - m - Baccalaureate Sermon — The 
Reverend A. Graham Baldwin, A.B., B.D., D.D., Chaplain, 
Phillips Academy 

Senior Supper, 6:00 p.m. 

Commencement Concert, 7:30 p.m. 
June 6 Graduation Exercises, 10:00 a.m. Commencement address by 

Harold Taylor, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., President, Sarah Lawrence 

College 




These have I loved . . . 

The early morning corridors of Draper 

With busyness of mops and making beds 

And mingling shouts — "Has anybody seen ?" 

"Could anybody do ?" "Will someone please. . .?' 

And early evening corridors of Draper . . . 

Fidelio returning, trilling some last clear notes, 

And Homestead, breathless, tumbling in for dinner. 

And I have loved 

The hockey field in autumn with blue clad figures 

Neatly spaced, alert and tense, attention 

Fixed on one sole aim, to serve the team; 

In fall, the maple walk all roseate gold; 

In spring, a delicate tracery of amber green; 

And in winter, Sunset's slope of snow unbroken 

Till skiing neophytes courageously 

Descend, and fall and laugh and struggle up 

And soon the short day ends with glowing sky. 

And these have I loved — 

The shy and tongue-tied girl newly arrived, 

Eager to please, homesick perhaps but brave, 

Striving for self-reliance, watchfully waiting, 



And the seniors, newly important, showing the way. 

And I have loved the breathless twitter of girls 

Awaiting that marvelous boy, or the unknown date 

And the embarrassed meeting, the appraising mutual glance. 

And I have loved those first appearances 

Of brave young artists playing or singing, conquering 

Fear, then quickly making an awkward bow, 

Exquisite as spring flowers, and year by year 

Growing in grace and confidence till I, 

Quite humbly, wonder at their accomplishment. 

And I have loved a sea of well known faces 

Looking up, two hundred voices clear 

Singing as one "Jerusalem the Golden" 

Or "We lift to Thee our joyous hymn of Praise" 

As if no troubled thought had yet disturbed 

Youth's faith, youth's hope. But I have loved also 

Their questions and their doubts, their honest search 

For truth; and I have loved the modest smile 

When some hard task completed brought well earned praise. 

And I have loved the Circle on sunlit mornings 

With Bach or Beethoven or both echoing 

Across the green; and the quiet of Abbot Hall 

At Vespers; the choir, each face aglow, inspired 

By beauty that lifts us all out of ourselves, 

And, at the end, the hand clasp, the trusting eyes 

As all pass one by one to say goodnight. 

And so through all the hours and all seasons 

I'll see and hear my Abbot girls, . . . 

These have I loved. 



^^Cx^e.L^-'Ul^ I- a/lO^S^ 



Alumnae Day 



Well over ioo loyal alumnae returned to Abbot on May 7 to celebrate 
the 126th birthday of the school, to renew Abbot friendships with reunions, 
to witness the ground-breaking ceremonies for the George Ezra Abbot Gym- 
nasium, and, above all, to honor Miss Hearsey on her retirement after ig 
years as principal. 

The alumnae, meeting in the chapel "where we belong", to quote an 
older graduate, first heard the good news that the Gym Fund had reached 
$197,000 of which they had contributed $27,690, nearly reaching their 
quota of 10% of their original goal of $300,000. This represents the greatest 
number of alumnae contributors and the largest amount ever given by 
alumnae in one year in the history of Abbot. 

This tremendous response was one way in which we alumnae had shown 
our respect and admiration for Miss Hearsey who had dreamed for so long 
and worked so hard for this very necessary addition to Abbot. But our love 
for her was to be demonstrated in a more personal way. We were loath to let 
her leave Abbot without "the tie that binds", so on the motion of Miss Jane 
Carpenter, Dr. Marguerite Capen Hearsey was made an honorary member 
of the Abbot Academy Alumnae Association. Then as a tribute to the warmth 
of relationship and understanding Miss Hearsey has shown all her girls, 
each class since 1937 presented her with pictures of her graduates, their 
husbands and children, bound in an Abbot blue leather folder. To those of us 
whose association with Miss Hearsey, has been in the years since graduation, 
it was a very moving experience to feel the deep affection those girls had for 
her and the great influence she has had on their lives. As a lasting token of 
our love, the Alumnae Association, representing 3300 alumnae, presented 
Miss Hearsey with a gold watch, a constant reminder of our faith in her, 
with thanks for what she has brought to Abbot, and for leaving us so much of 
herself that she can never take away. Helen Allen Henry '32 






Report of the Treasurer 

April 29, 1955 

To the Trustees of Abbot Academy: 

I ask your indulgence as I omit discussion 
of policies and other data at this April 
meeting of the Board of Trustees. 

Rather, do I wish to present but one text. 

"THE YEARS BETWEEN" 

1 936-1 955 






The following vignettes concern some 
of the activities to which our Principal, 
Miss Hearsey, has devoted this period of 
her life. 
Abbot has been singularly blessed in the quality of her principals. 
Each by natural endowment, training and accomplishment has enriched 
the character and intellectual life of those committed to her supervision 
and care. 



MISS HEARSEY 

came to Abbot at a juncture when she was obliged to chart the details of 
internal management and administration without the benefit of conference 
with her predecessor. 

Her degree work at Hollins, Radcliffe and Yale; her teaching at Bryn Mawr 
and Wellesley, followed by her professorship and deanship at Hollins stood 
her in good stead as the new incumbent to lead the future of the school. 



Her natural interest and enjoyment of the associations with youth were 
continued as she enriched her contacts with groups of students in classroom 
— on campus — and at her delightful home at "Sunset". These groups 
served to establish a basis of appreciation of intellectual pursuits by coming 
into intimate contact with a good mind and a consecrated soul. 

Her selection and nurture of a faculty of quality has been met by their loyalty 
and devotion. 

Her leadership has been reflected in a spirit which has radiated far beyond 
the Abbot campus for her standards of culture and character were known 
to be high. 

She has been blessed with good health and the ability to work on educational 
problems and projects successfully in the competitive world of the Independ- 
ent School for girls. 

They honored her as fitted and qualified to lead them as President. 
She accordingly has brought prestige to herself and to Abbot. 



Her annual invitation for the Seniors to join her for a few days at "Snowy" 
Intervale after the "Mid-years"; her picnic gatherings on the sands of Ip- 
swich Bay; the choice of a high order of lectures and musicales; the tea 
dances at the school have represented the catholicity of her taste in breaking 
up "a bit" the steady routine of a student's daily activities. 



I 



By virtue of her position she has been brought into contact with numerous 
women and men, parents and guardians. 

Her understanding of the problems of youth and her ability to adjust the 
individual to the ultimate goal of fine womanhood comprise durable satis- 
factions for her as teacher, administrator, and counsellor. 
These add up to one of the richest rewards humankind can experience. 



Her notable leadership has testified to her spiritual and inspirational power. 
Her ideals have been uniformly high, her tastes refined, her devotion un- 
tiring. 

Graduates have often remarked upon prayers at morning chapel indicating 
the breadth and sincerity of her interests. 



Under her guidance the cumulative prestige of a notable school has been 
strengthened; physical resources have been increased; standards of high 
scholarship and character have been sustained and traditions have been 
respected. 

We have shared our principal's rare gift of humor; her skill in telling a story, 

her genial personality. 

We have known her as a generous hostess and a delightful companion. 

We have cooperated with her as with skill and effectiveness she has pursued 

her objectives. 

As Miss Hearsey lays down the sceptre of office, she can retire with few re- 
grets and look back upon her years at Abbot as rich in experience, rewarding 
in results and with realization that the gratitude of many souls on earth is 
hers without asking. 



May I offer these few items 
of tribute 

affection 

and 

appreciation. 



Respectfully submitted, 

BURTON S. FLAGG 

Treasurer 



Trustees 71 Meeting 

Dear Alumnae: 

Had it not been for the fact that I once had the privilege of 
serving you and Abbot as alumnae trustee, I would not have 
been honored with an invitation to the very beautiful dinner 
given for Miss Hearsey by the Trustees of Abbot Academy 
on April 29th at The Country Club, Clyde Street, Brookline. 
So, this is my thank-you note. 

The feasting ended, and it was a royal feast indeed. Rev. 
Sidney Lovett, Chaplain of Yale University, a trustee of Abbot, 
and a master of the bon mot, spoke for all of us in paying 
tribute to Miss Hearsey. 

As proof of these honest sentiments, Mr. Robert Hunne- 
man, president of the Board, left the table to return with an 
impressive scroll in the one hand and a mysterious package 
in the other. The scroll, couched in unassailable legal terms, 
actually, albeit facetiously, deeded to Marguerite Capen 
Hearsey the desk at which during her occupancy of "Sunset" 
she has worked far into the night and far too early in the 
morning. Then came the surprise package! This gift was pre- 
sented with the hope that it might give increasing pleasure. Its 
wrappings fell away to reveal a beautifully framed original 
painting by Jerrie Ricci, a young woman whose work has 
already received acclaim. You see, there is "art" in being an 
Abbot trustee. 

I think we were all caught up in Miss Hearsey's happiness 
and so could forget for a little while that a very wonderful 
chapter in Abbot's history was fast drawing to a close. 

It was an evening long to be remembered, and again 
I thank you. 

Cordially yours, 

Margaret VanVoorhis '18 



Faculty Resolution 



In the nineteen years during which Miss Hearsey has been Principal of 
the school, the teachers, the administrative staff, and all those who have had 
occasion to work with her in any way have derived constant encouragement 
and renewed zest from her generous attitudes and vigorous leadership. De- 
spite the endless, varied and fatiguing demands on her time and energy, re- 

8 



suiting from her selfless conception of the scope of her duties, she has been 
always accessible to teachers and students alike, always ready to approve 
and help to further whatever would contribute to the full functioning of the 
school. 

It is with lively appreciation of her fairness and her optimism and with 
admiration for the quality and breadth of her scholarship that we make this 
testimony, but most of all we value the opportunity which we have had to 
observe and learn to share her unflagging belief in the good potentialities in 
the many young people whom she has known and counselled. 

Strong as is our sense of personal loss on this occasion of Miss Hearsey's 
retirement, each of us is sustained by her pleasure in the happy and abiding 
friendship which has been the result of these years of close association; and 
we are conscious of our good fortune in feeling that the groundwork for more 
good years in the school has been laid by the opportunities which we have 
had to become acquainted with Mrs. Crane. 



Ave Atque Vale 

Nineteen years ago I attended for the first time the graduation exercises 
at Abbot. The dignity and beauty of the occasion, strengthened by long 
tradition impressed me deeply. And now, approaching the Commencement 
of my nineteenth year as part of the Abbot family, I feel historical myself! 
The years have gone swiftly and the dominant memories are very satisfying 
ones. There have been problems, yes, and the inevitable changes that may 
bring some regret, and some that have brought sorrow, but the memory of 
twelve hundred girls who have come and stayed a few years — who through 
our gates "entering into learning have gone forth into nobler living" — 
will always be a source of deepest happiness to me. I am grateful to you all for 
your affection and support from the days when you were very young, until 
today, when some of you have children coming to Abbot. 

The delightful album of informal pictures of yourselves and your families 
that you have made for me will give me recurrent pleasure, and I shall hope 
that its pages will grow in number as the girls who couldn't get their pictures 
here in time, send them to me, and as those who did, send new pictures as 
they have additions to their families. 

I find it difficult to express adequately my gratitude for this living gift, 
and further, for the beautiful watch from the Alumnae Association. As Irene 
Atwood suggested, these gifts with that of the Honorary membership voted 
me in the Alumnae Association, will bind me with visible and invisible ties 
to Abbot through the years to come. 

My affectionate good wishes will go with you all, and I shall follow 
Abbot's progress through the coming years with confidence and love. 

M.C.H. 

9 



Board of Trustees Notes 

Two new members were elected to the Board of Trustees in April, 1955. 
We present them here with a brief biographical sketch: 





Jane Bassett Baldwin 

140 East 28th Street 
New York 16, New York 

Born, Duluth, Minnesota; Abbot Academy, 
1922; Katharine Gibbs Secretarial School, 1924; 
entered Irving Trust Company, 1930; Invest- 
ment Service Department, three years; Estates 
and Trusts Department, twenty-two years; 
Trust Administrator, thirteen years; alumnae 
trustee, Abbot Academy, 1948- 1954; president 
of the Women's Bond Club of New York; direc- 
tor of the Jacob A. Riis Neighborhood Settle- 
ment. 



Caroline Stevens Rogers 

(Mrs. Horatio Rogers) 

580 Osgood Street 
North Andover, Massachusetts 

Born, North Andover, Massachusetts; Winsor 
School; A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 191 7; mother 
of two boys and two girls; eight grandchildren; 
served overseas with Children's Bureau of 
American Red Cross in World War I; trustee 
and first vice-president of The Children's 
Museum, Boston; trustee of James Jackson Put- 
nam Children's Center, Boston; trustee of New 
England Peabody Home for Crippled Children; 
trustee of Lawrence General Hospital; director 
of North Andover Historical Societv. 



10 



Ground Breaking Ceremony 




Left to right — Irene Atwood, J. Radford Abbot, Mary Howard Nutting, E. Benjamin Red- 
field, Jr., Dorothy Judd, Burton S. Flagg, Pamela Carpenter, Edmund Rappoli, Miss 
Hearsey, Rev. Alexander S. Twombly, Helen Allen Henry. 



Ground was broken for the George Ezra Abbot Memorial Gymnasium 
on Saturday, May 7, at 12:30 P.M. Robert I. Hunneman, president of the 
Board of Trustees, opened the ceremony with the following remarks: 

"Fifteen years ago this spring, George Abbot (who had been state 
doubles champion) asked me if I would be his tennis partner in a tournament 
to be held by the Dedham Tennis Club. After I had accepted and expressed 
my pleasure at being asked, George went on to say that the chairman of the 
tournament committee had asked him, in the interest of maintaining some 
semblance of equality among the teams, to choose a partner who wasn't 
much good. As in everything else he did, George hewed straight to the line. 

"I am reminded of this every working day for on my desk there is a 
small pewter dish bearing the inscription "Runners up — G. E. Abbot — 
R. I. Hunneman." George nearly pulled me through. 

"What that dish does for me alone this gymnasium will do for Abbot. 

"George would have made an ideal headmaster and I suspect that at 
times he wished he were one. He contributed more to education than he 
would admit. Although a busy business man, he was trustee of three schools 
and President of Abbot Board of Trustees at the time of his death. As such, he 
devoted a significant part of his time to them. If one school needed money he 
assumed the chief responsibility for raising it. If another needed help in the 

11 



administration of its business affairs, he provided it. But his chief interest was 
in these schools as institutions for the education of young men and young 
women. 

"Too modest to make many suggestions in a field in which he was 
better qualified than he knew, he observed the educational process with a 
keen interest. Much as he admired Miss Hearsey as a headmistress, he ad- 
mired even more her scholarly interests. He inspected the work of students 
exhibited at meetings of the trustees held at the school with the fondness of a 
father. And he was delighted whenever he found a story or an article in the 
school magazine of unusual literary merit. 

"Beyond his business and his interest in education George had a great 
awareness of the accomplishments of earlier generations and of this genera- 
tion's indebtedness to them. He admired his forbears who established the 
Abbot homestead. He admired the men who built the railroad which passed 
close to it, the embankment of which can still be seen across the road. He 
admired the founders of this school. He admired their hard work, their self 
reliance, their vision. He knew, what some of us are apt to forget, that we 
today are no more enlightened, perhaps less so, than those who have gone 
before us merely because our predecessors did not have automobiles or even 
modern plumbing. 

"In this sense George was a traditionalist. But he was no reactionary 
for he understood that this generation and future ones must bring about 
changes as have the past. 

"The memory of George preserved in this building will do Abbot good." 

The next speaker was Burton S. Flagg, treasurer of Abbot since 1906, 
who said: 

"Members of our Abbot family: 

"The ground upon which we are standing this noon was originally 
owned by the Trustees of the Andover Theological Seminary and occupancy 
was by one of the professors. When the Seminary moved to the city of Cam- 
bridge and affiliated itself with Harvard College, its Trustees deeded this 
property to the Trustees of Abbot Academy. 

"The funds to construct this George Ezra Abbot Gymnasium have been 
given by friends, parents and alumnae of Abbot. It will be the last word in 
efficient handling of the affairs of the Department of Physical Education. It 
will complement the other three units to form a quadrangle flanked by the 
Antoinette Hall Taylor Infirmary at the east of us, Draper Hall to the north 
of us, and Abbot Hall to the west of us. 

"The architect checked with many similar structures for the best points 
in usefulness and design. The Chairman of our Physical Education Depart- 
ment likewise checked. So these excellent results should produce the best in 
utility value for a unit of this type. 

"Generous believers in Abbot's mission in this world have pledged so 
the building could be started right away. Two-thirds of the total needed 



12 



is in hand. We must increase our efforts for the remaining one-third for the 
endowment of the building and we all hope very much thai this sum will 
be raised before the building is completed. 

"But I must be brief. My mind and heart prompt me at this moment to 
extend deep and sincere gratitude to those friends, parents and alumnae who 
have shown their great interest and support of this project. 

"We are not building for this day only. We are constructing a unit for 
the use of future generations, after many of us have finished the day's work. 
My thanks and appreciation again for your continued loyalty on this one 
hundred and twenty-sixth birthday." 

Before turning the first shovelful of earth, Miss Hearsey said: 

"I am delighted to have this opportunity at the very moment of the 
breaking of ground for the George Ezra Abbot gymnasium to express our 
gratitude to everyone who had a part in making it possible: 

"For the warm and generous decision of the anonymous donors to make 
in George Ezra Abbot's memory a gift to the school that represents half of the 
cost of the building; 

"To the parents of girls of many generations and particularly of girls of 
this present student group for the gifts that represent their faith in the school; 
their belief that this building will contribute to the school's aim in developing 
character as well as brains; 

"To the faculty who give of themselves daily without counting the cost, 
for their further evidence of dedication to the school through their generous 
gifts; 

"To the students of this generation — especially the seniors who will not 
be here to use this building — for their contributions and for the projects 
they have carried out by which to earn money, and for the enthusiasm which 
they have conveyed to their parents: 

"To all the friends who have made gifts and patronized our various fund 
raising affairs, and to our devoted, hard working and generous trustees; 

"And finally to the alumnae — our old girls; 
Because of their support, their tireless work, and their gifts — many of 
which I am sure represent some self denial — this building will have built 
into its very fabric the love and loyalty of Abbot girls of the past three score 
years and ten. 

"To all of these I should like to express for the school and for all its com- 
ing generations of girls deep appreciation of the splendid new building we are 
to have for Physical Education. I believe that the importance of Physical 
Education and Sports is far more than that of health and recreation — im- 
portant as these are. I believe the qualities that will be developed here and 
on our playing fields, are those that are essential to the creating of fine human 
beings — self-control and self-discipline, mutual support on teams without 
thought of one's own glory: and the ability to accept victory as well as defeat 
and disappointment with equanimity. And so I see this new building playing 

13 



an essential part in the full development of the kind of women Abbot was 
founded to educate. 

"This is the one hundred and twenty-sixth anniversary of the school. 
The spade we are to use in breaking ground is historic. It was first used 
seventy-six years ago on our fiftieth birthday. On its handle there is the date 
1879, a painting of Abbot Hall as it looked before it was moved, and the 
words from the Bible, "Behold I have set before you an open door". This 
quotation suggests, I believe, Abbot's aim throughout the years. 

"I now take the greatest pleasure in turning the first ground for the 
foundation of the George Ezra Abbot Gymnasium." 

After Miss Hearsey turned the first shovelful of earth, Robert I. Hunne- 
man and Burton S. Flagg turned the ground. Also participating were Helen 
Allen Henry '32, chairman of the building fund, Irene Atwood '18, president 
of the Alumnae Association, Mary Howard Nutting '40, chairman of the 
Alumnae Fund Committee, Mr. E. Benjamin Redfield, chairman of the 
Parents' Committee, Dorothy Judd, Physical Education director, Pamela 
Carpenter, student president of the Athletic Association. 

Prayer was offered by Reverend Alexander S. Twombly. 

The ceremony closed with the singing of "Fair Alma Mater." 



In memory of Mr. Irving W. Southworth, Trustee of Abbot Academy 
from 1923 to 1950, a unique gift of four fore-edge painted books has been 
made to the school by Mrs. Irving W. Southworth, her two daughters, Mrs. 
Richard Gerstell (Vivian Southworth '30) and Mrs. Gardner Sutton (Eliza- 
beth Southworth '30) and Mr. Roy C. Southworth, a brother of the late Mr. 
Southworth. The books will in themselves constitute a valuable addition to 
the stock of the library, being early editions of Jeremy Taylor's Holy Living 
and Holy Dying, a translation of the works of Virgil by John Dryden, and an 
edition of James Thomson's The Seasons which was published in 1793; but it 
is an outstanding example of the craft of fore-edge paintings, an art which 
flowered in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, that these books afford 
most unusual interest and pleasure. It is not often that a memorial gift repre- 
sents so well the taste or the attributes of the personality being commemo- 
rated, but in this instance the pleasing colors and the fine details of expert 
craftsmanship do serve as a reminder of the finely appreciative and scrupu- 
lous gentleman who was both a neighbor and trustee of the school for so 
many years. 



14 



Reunion Groups 




Left to right — Frances Cutler Knickerbocker '05 and Minnie Merrill Willis '85 




1910 

Left to right — Grace Kellogg, Clarissa Hall Hammond, Ethel Kelsey Perry, Louise Tuttle 
Abbott, Ruth Newcomb, Lillie Johnson Smith, Lydia Skolfield Parsons, and Ruth Murray 
Moore 



*5 




1920 
Left to right — Margaret Ackroyd Hunt, Hilda Heath Safford, Bertha Worman Smith, and 
Katherine Hamblet 




1930 
Left to right — Betty Southworth Sutton, Donna Brace Kroeck, Christine Hollands Struck, 
Kathie Fellows Ingraham, Barbara Healey Holland, Mary Shepard Wiley, Barbara Lord 
Mathias, Libby Tarr Morse, Betty Perry Lewis, Ruth Baker Johnson, Janice Lovell Jenkins, 
Marianna Smith Hile, Louise Atkinson Dunsford, Barbara Lamson Cummings, Hortense 
Dunbar, Rosamond Castle Olivetti, Grace Hadley MacMillan, Marjorie Turner Fisher, 
and Frances Sullivan Sullivan 



16 




1935 
Left to right — Margit Thony, Susan Hildreth Goodwin, Frances McTernen Coan, Cathleen 
Burns Elmer, Barbara Chamberlain MacCready, Elizabeth Morgan Foster, Claire Oppen- 
heim Marum, and Eleanor Johnson Du Toit. 



• 






mml! ii ML tn Ml » Jhhi 



1940 
Left to right — Mary Howara Nutting, Doris Sawyer Hoar, Elisabeth Ellis Chase, Phyllis 
Crocker England, Rachel Whitney Davis, Mollie Chase Foster, Anne Rivinius Wild, Elaine 
Dalrymple Borowski, and Nancy Harrison 

17 




1945 
Left to right — Katharine Mulford, Mary Robbins Blue, Holly Welles Locke, Hilary Paterson 
Cleveland, Helen Morris Stearns 







Left to right — Martha Morse Abbot '47, Betsy Aldrich '52, Joan Aldrich '50, Cynthia Noone 
'46, Jane Moss Bidwell '49, Frances Russell '51, Betsy Goodspeed Fellner '50, and Mary 
Bixby Lamb '50 



t8 



George Ezra Abbot Memorial 
Gymnasium Fund 

Total — $201,330 

Alumnae - - - $ 29,531 

Parents $ 48,542 

Friends - $123,257 

Still to Be Raised — $98,670 

Abbot Second Century Alumnae Fund 

Gymnasium - $29,531 

Scholarships $ 1,480 

1025 Contributors 31% of Total Alumnae 

Average Gift — $30 

A complete list of alumnae contributors will be published in the October 
Bulletin. 



Report on the New Gymnasium 
Now Under Construction 

The goal of $300,000 is two-thirds subscribed by gifts and pledges. The 
remaining one-third or $100,000 for maintenance and endowment we hope 
to raise before the building is completed in the autumn. We need united 
and strong effort from now on to reach the final sum. 

Note for the few: Securities as gifts are welcome. Many have been sent in 
by those owning them for value much less than the cost. You receive credit for 
the full amount of the present market value and save the capital gains tax. 
Your tax savings is up to 30% of your gross annual income. If you will look 
over your investments, you will probably find an opportunity to make a gift 
far larger than you would feel able to do on the basis of the cost of your 
investment. 

J 9 






Annual Meeting of the Alumnae 
Association 

SECRETARY'S REPORT 

The Abbot Academy Alumnae Association held its annual meeting, 
May 7, at 10:45 a.m. in the Chapel. Miss Irene Atwood called the meeting 
to order, and welcomed the alumnae. 

The following reports were read and accepted: Clerk, Barbara Healey 
Holland, 1930; Treasurer, Mary Dooley Bragg, 1936; General Secretary, 
Jane Sullivan, 1931 . 

Miss Sullivan read the list of alumnae whose deaths had been reported 
during the year. Constance Parker Chipman, 1906, spoke about Mary Gorton 
Darling's loyalty and devotion to Abbot. 

The Association voted to give $250 to the Gymnasium Fund. 

Helen Allen Henry, 1932, chairman of the Gymnasium Fund, reported 
on the progress of the campaign and announced that $196,886 had been 
raised. 

Mary Howard Nutting, 1940, chairman of the Alumnae Fund, an- 
nounced that the total alumnae contributions to Gymnasium and Scholar- 
ship amounted to $28,171. This represents gifts from 31% of the alumnae. 

Miss Atwood introduced the following alumnae: Minnie Merrill Willis, 
1885; Jane B. Carpenter, 1892; Elizabeth Nichols Bean, 1893; Hanna Greene 
Holt and Esther Smith Lougee, 1894; Grace W. Dorr, 1895; Frances Cutler 
Knickerbocker, 1905. 

The president gave to the alumnae the school's invitation to luncheon, 
and said that at this time Miss Hearsey would present Mrs. Crane. She 
also invited the alumnae to the tea in honor of Mrs. Crane at 4 p.m. in the 
Alumnae Headquarters. 

On the motion of Jane B. Carpenter, Miss Hearsey was made an honor- 
ary member of the Alumnae Association. An album containing snap-shots 
of all students from 1936- 1955 was presented to Miss Hearsey. The Alumnae 
Association also presented her with a gold watch and bracelet. (See Helen 
Allen Henry's report.) 

The fifty-eight members of the Senior class marched in, singing their 
class song. Miss Hearsey presented the class. Miss Atwood welcomed them 
as new members of the association, and introduced the alumnae relatives in 
the class. The list follows: 

Susan Appleton — daughter of Helen Cutler Appleton, 1932 
Elizabeth Baldwin — sister of Barbara Baldwin Potter, 1950 
Elizabeth Beal — daughter of Henrietta Thompson Beal, 1 92 1 ; niece of 

Elizabeth Thompson Winslow, 1921 
Judith Carpenter — cousin of Pamela Carpenter, 1955 
Pamela Carpenter — cousin of Judith Carpenter, 1955 
Marlena Comas — cousin of Anisia Allen, 1952 

Mary Earhart — granddaughter of Carrie Louise Beal Earhart, Aff. 1891; 
sister of Patricia Earhart, 1953; cousin of Ann Kennedy, 
J 953 

20 



Sally Graf — daughter of Mary Eaton Graf, 1929 

Deborah Green — niece of Alice Hougen Ball, 1925 

Margaret Holbrook — niece of Gertrude Emily Holbrook, 1925 

Mary Ann Holden — sister of Paula Holden, 1951 

Nancy Johnson — daughter of Ruth Baker Johnson, 1930 

Jane Kent — granddaughter of Adelaide Gale Kent, Aff. 1884 

Joan Lamprey — daughter of Ruth Stafford Lamprey, 1926 

Susan McGuire — daughter of Helen Connolly McGuire, 1927; niece of 

Ruth Connolly Burke, 1925 
Mary Minard — daughter of Dorothy Patton Minard, former faculty mem- 
ber 
Jeanne Skillin — sister of Patricia Skillin, 1954 
Katherine Stirling — cousin of Ellen Chaplin, 1951 
Carol Straton — cousin of Marion B. Sanford, 1910, and Helen Taylor 

Dodd, 1948 
Sara Watrous — daughter of Elizabeth Peck Watrous, 1923; niece of Sara 
Peck, 1938 
The seniors sang salutes to Miss Hearsey, Miss Atwood, Minnie Merrill 
Willis '85, the 50- and 25-year classes, and led the singing of several Abbot 
songs. 

The meeting adjourned to attend the ground-breaking ceremonies for 
the Gymnasium. 

C. Jane Sullivan, Alumnae Secretary 

TREASURER'S REPORT 1954-1955 
May 8, 1955 Balance in Andover National Bank Si 103. 30 

Receipts 
Interest from Invested Funds 389 . 92 

Luncheon Receipts from Joint Meeting of Abbot 

Alumnae and Boston Abbot Club 
Total 

Disbursements 
Jane Sullivan — Postage and Travel Expenses 
Abbot Academy — Postage and Notepaper 
Alumnae Luncheon Flowers for Birthday Celebration 
American Alumni Council Dues 
Smith Alumnae Quarterly 
Miss Hearsey's Discretionary Fund 
Eagle Tribune Co. — Luncheon Invitations 
Women's City Club of Boston — Abbot Alumnae and Boston 

Abbot Club Luncheon 

Total 602 . 1 3 

Balance in Andover National Bank $1035.09 

Mary Dooley Bragg, Treasurer 

I have examined the accounts and found the balance to be correct. 

Sally Bodwell Houghton, Auditor 

21 



144 


00 


$1637 


22 


53 


59 


103 


9 1 


77 


00 


55 


00 


2 


00 


100 


00 


42 


00 


168 


63 



Club News 

Boston 

The joint meeting of the Boston Abbot Club and the Alumnae Associa- 
tion was held March 12, at the Women's City Club in Boston. Miss Hearsey 
spoke about her years at Abbot. Several present-day Abbot students enter- 
tained. 

A play written by Polly Francis Loesch '29 for the Gymnasium Fund was 
presented by the Club members. 

The following officers were elected: President, Mary Trafton Simonds 
'36 (Mrs. John H.); 1st vice-president, Beverly Brooks Floe '41 (Mrs. Carl F.); 
2nd vice-president, Aagot Hinrichsen Cain '44 (Mrs. John E.); corresponding 
secretary, Joyce Yojfa Rudolph '43 (Mrs. Robert P.); recording secretary, 
Jane Ruth Hovey '26; treasurer, Nancy Kimball Fowle '27 (Mrs. Leonard 
M.); auditor, Pauline Spear Chapin '36 (Mrs. Walter S.). 

Eastern Maine 

The club is planning to have its annual meeting, July 5, 1955. 

New York 

The annual meeting was held April 2, at the Barclay. The club sent 
$100 to Abbot for the Gymnasium Fund. Miss Sullivan brought news of the 
school. Miss Friskin's delightful recital brought back memories of many 
concerts at Abbot. 

Washington 

Miss Hearsey spoke at a tea held March 1, at the home of Elizabeth 
Marsh Birney '45 (Mrs. James G.) for the alumnae in the Washington Area. 






P touted. Hitijalna . . . <M&i&l to. Ifau 

Betsy Aldrich '52 — Dean's List and President of Student Government 

— Wheaton College 
Sylvia Finger '51 — Phi Beta Kappa — Smith College 
Martha Gross '53 — Dean's List — Connecticut College 
Anna Hewlett '54 — Virginia C. Gildersleeve Prize in Freshman English 

— Barnard College 
Madeleine Kimberly '51 — Dean's List — Pembroke College 
Ann Merchant '52 — Editor-in-chief Yearbook — Rosemont College 
Cora Alice St. John, '51 — May Queen — Mount Holyoke College 
Ruth Sidon '53 — May Queen and Treasurer of Student Body Council — 

Peace College 
Shirley Young '51 — Senior Durant Scholar and Junior Phi Beta Kappa 

— Wellesley College 



22 




3n Remembrance 

MARY M AH ALA GORTON, 1886 
(MRS. FRANK DARLING) 

November 22, 1864 — March 29, 1955 

"Abbot Academy has been one of the major 
enthusiasms of an enthusiastic life." This was said 
not by an alumna but by a Hampton, Virginia, 
friend. She herself once wrote "The very word 
Abbot sends a glow through our whole being!" 
She even began her service early as an undergradu- 
ate by helping her warm-hearted mother — who 
had charge of the housekeeping at South Hall (now 
Sunset Lodge) — nurse a fellow student through 
diphtheria. 

Up to the time of Mrs. Darling's election as 
President of the Alumnae Association (she served two terms 1918-22), this 
officer had been merely a figurehead, her responsibilities really limited to 
presiding at the annual business meeting in June. One of her first moves was 
to call a conference with Miss Bailey, Mr. Flagg, and the two Secretaries of 
the Association to discuss the general interests of the School. It was in this 
period that the Loyalty Fund was started, and she gave it an impetus with a 
persuasive leaflet. It is significant of her active interest in Abbot concerns 
that as soon as the Fund was completed in 1929, she was ready with sug- 
gestions as to what project the alumnae might take up next. She was also at 
one time President of the New York Abbot Club, and a frequent attendant 
thereafter, neither distance nor weather deterring her. 

Too much cannot be said of her loyalty to the class from the day of 
graduation on, helping always to make it a unit. Her many gifts were gener- 
ous and unostentatious. She was even able to join two classmates here for her 
65th reunion. The devotion of the class to their "Haly" was equally strong 
and constant. With characteristic hospitality she and her husband held open 
house at their beautiful Cedar Hall in Hampton for the whole class, once for 
two weeks, and again and again with the husbands included. 

In her home town, Molly Darling led a life crammed full of all sorts of 
social, church, and philanthropic activities. She continued a life-long interest 
in Indian welfare, she was a trustee of Hampton Institute, and in war time 
she provided frequent and sprightly entertainment for service men stationed 
near by. 

With undaunted courage she went through repeated bereavements, the 
death of her husband in 1941, and very recently of her devoted son. So also 
she met with undaunted courage her physical disabilities, culminating in a 

23 



broken hip last year just before the great Brithday Celebration, to which up 
to the last minute she was determined to come. She died suddenly in her] 
own Cedar Hall, leaving two granddaughters of whom she was very proud. 

All who have come within reach of her exuberant spirit will mourn heil 
passing while rejoicing in the memory of all that her life has meant to thd 
School. 

J.B.C 



Jn iHemortam 



1885 

Charlotte Atkinson (Mrs. Francis S. E. 
Gunnell) died January 10, 1954, in Winter 
Park, Fla. 

1886 

Ella W. Bray died recently in Milton, 
Mass. 

Helen Howard Buck (Mrs. George W. 
Buck) died February 8, 1946, in Wilming- 
ton, Mass. 

Margaret Redford (Mrs. Edward S. 
Ready) died Dec. 8, 1954, in Helena, 
Arkansas. 

1887 

Sophia Walker (Mrs. S. W. Piper) died 
Dec. 15, 1954, in Holliston, Mass. She was 
90 years old. She is survived by her son, 
Samuel W. Piper, four grandchildren and 
one great-grandchild. 

1897 

Blanche Orrall (Mrs. Theron H. Huckins) 
died recently in Tilton, N. H. 

Edith Poor (Mrs. James D. Brennan) died 
April 1, 1954, in Middlebury, Vermont. 

1898 

Anna Elizabeth Morton (Mrs. Edgar H. 
Price) died recently in Decoto, Calif. 

1906 

Carita Kimball (Mrs. C. K. Russell) died 
April 23, 1955, in Andover. 

1907 

Oena Whyte (Mrs. Ray P. Hall) died last 
fall from heart disease in Gorham, Maine. 

1920 

Lydia McCreary (Mrs. Robert H. Per- 
sons) died in East Aurora, N. Y., in Nov. 
1954. 



24 



Class News 



1885 

Minnie Merrill Willis attended Alumnae 
Day, May 7th. She lives in Longmeadow, 
Mass., with her only daughter and her 
husband, and is very well physically. 

Lillian R. Woodward writes: "I asked my 
sister what my activities were and she said, 
'lying down'. However, after a broken 
ankle and a cracked rib, I still manage to 
get downstairs and sit on one of our porches 
(weather permitting). Evenings I often 
play bridge but refuse to learn the new 
games — Samba, Canasta, etc. On account 
of my eyes I read little but the morning 
paper. I look through several magazines. 
I read headlines but dislike being read to. 
I listen a good deal to the radio news items, 
music and commentators. I voted the Re- 
publican ticket and am glad to have an 
honest man in the White House, though I 
do not think some men are ever politicians." 

1887 

Our classmate, Sophia Walker Piper, en- 
tered Abbot Academy earlier than any of 
the seventeen girls who graduated in 1887. 
Her loyalty to Abbot and love for her class- 
mates increased with the years. A year ago 
she wrote: "Remember, any thing that the 
other girls would like to do, I am with 
them." There were months of failing 
strength, then a fractured hip on Nov. 2nd 
and much suffering. Her courage and faith 
did not falter. Her son Sam writes: "Her 
last words, barely audible, were from the 
hymn, 'Rock of Ages'. I cannot tell you the 
blessing it has been to have a really practicing 
Christian for my mother. I am proud of her 
and love to see the esteem that others had for 
her. Please tell the rest of your classmates 
(there are three) and let Abbot know, too. 
I will never forget the class letter. It seems 
older than I am, and I am 59." 

1889 

The class will be sorry to learn that Eva- 
lena French Anderson's daughter, Dorothy 
Anderson Boyce, died January 6, 1955. She 



was nearly blind all her life, and Evalena 
devoted her whole life to taking care of her. 

1890 

"Some Observations on one's 'Sixty-fifth': 

"If for some years one lives in a Con- 
valescent Home, one could hardly choose a 
happier location than the town of Southern 
Pines in the 'Land of the Long Leaved Pine.' 

"It is amazing how many of one's price- 
less, happy memories, whether they be of 
further study, travel, teaching, experience, 
or things of the spirit, are rooted in the years 
at Abbot. 

"We bless the old school in our hearts." 

Jessie Elizabeth Guernsey 

"Greetings from Anna S. Johnston of 
1890, to all the Abbot girls I know. 

"For forty-four years I taught school, 
first in a little, one-room country school- 
house, but before long, in Mount Vernon, 
New York, High school where I remained 
thirty-nine years. Since then I have made 
that city my home. Summers I spend with 
my brother and his family at Quaker Lake 
in the upper Pennsylvania hills. 

"Fortunately I have had such good health 
that I have been able to do considerable 
civic and patriotic work, also to attend 
lectures, concerts, and art exhibits in New 
York, — all of which things I still do. Until 
this year I have been able to drive ray car 
and enjoy the great beauties of Westchester 
County. Last fall I had to give up driving as 
my eyes began to fail. However, I can still 
see to read well and can enjoy watching 
good television programs. I am an active 
member of the First Presbyterian Church 
here, belong to the Westchester Woman's 
Club, am registrar of the Jonas Bronch 
Chapter of the Daughters of the American 
Revolution, and help with Day Nursery 
work and welfare fund drives. 

"Good luck to all Abbot girls, but es- 
pecially to those I knew." 

1895 

Bessie Adams Tryon sends her greetings to 
the class of 1895 and to Abbot. She is living 



The sum of $200 was received by Abbot in March — a bequest 
under the will of Ida E. Cushing, 1894, for the Alumnae Scholarship Fund. 



25 



very quietly in the same house on Rose 
Lane in Haverford, Penna. Her children 
and eight grandchildren who live nearby 
give her much interest and pleasure. 

Grace Dorr attended Alumnae Day on 
May 7. 

The following letters were received for the 
"paper" reunion: 

"Life has been eventful and happy. A son 
and a daughter have made places for them- 
selves in the world and there are two grand- 
children of college age. 

"Overhead I have what it pleases me to 
call my own forty acres of sky. The terrain 
that lies beneath that blue canopy is wood- 
land, largely second growth, varied in its 
native trees, thickly sprinkled with blossom- 
ing shad or dogwood. The garden spreads 
now a golden carpet — thousands of daffo- 
dils and jonquils, naturalized for years, are 
abloom. They weave in and out under bush 
or tree, reflecting their happiness in the 
pool and in the moss-edged drainage 
ditches transforming even a dark and 
cloudy day." 

Marjory Clark Barker 

"How much I would like to be at Abbot 
again, see the few old friends left, and note 
the many improvements. My last time there 
was when my older daughter, Lucy '24, 
graduated and then went to Wellesley. Her 
daughter is now at Wellesley. 

"As for my activities — there is little to 
say. It is a rare day that I am not out, at 
least for a walk. I drove almost forty years 
and thought nothing of stepping into my car 
and going to Flint for the day, or up to our 
cottage on Higgins Lake. Another daughter 
lives with me, and we are fond of movies. 
I also go to the concerts in our concert course. 

"My best wishes to Abbot" 

Kirty Eddy Shaw 

"Most of the years since Abbot have been 
spent in keeping house and taking care of my 
mother, two aunts and an invalid brother 
who passed away a year ago. 

"At various times I have done war work — 
indexing, and other library work. I organ- 
ized and headed the library of the U. S. 
Fuel Administration during World War I. 

"Also, I have tried to do my part in 
church and settlement work, D.A.R., and 
other club interests until the last few years. 

"I have been so crippled with arthritis 
and increasing deafness that I have had to 
give up many interests. 



"I have always hoped to return for a visit 
to Abbot during the school year, but it has 
not been possible. 

"With all best wishes for the future of 
Abbot." 

Flora L. P. Johnson 

1899 

The class extends its sympathy to Marie 
Hershey Bliss whose husband died in August, 
1953, and whose brother, Ben, died in 
February, 1955. 

1905 

The class extends its sympathy to Mildred 
Cleworth Davis whose husband died April 29, 
1955, in Cocoa, Fla. 

Ruth Pringle has a temporary position 
at the Annie Wright Seminary in Tacoma, 
Wash. 

"I was the only one of us at Abbot on 
Alumnae Day for our fiftieth "reunion"; I 
stood up alone when the seniors sang, "1905, 
here's to you." But there were schoolmates 
and old friends there to keep me from feeling 
lonely. 

"It was a beautiful day — what a contrast to 
last year's downpour! It was memorable for 
the affectionate tributes to Miss Hearsey and 
her heartfelt response; for our first meeting 
with Mrs. Crane, our gracious principal-to- 
be; and for the long-awaited and worked-for 
ground-breaking ceremony for the new 
gymnasium. 

"The replies to my cards brought varied 
news, some of it sad. Elizabeth Williams 
Ballard died suddenly last September. Her 
daughter wrote: "I know she always had 
most happy recollections of Abbot and held 
it and her classmates in high regard." 
Winifred Peirson Sheffer's husband died 
nearly a year ago and she is carrying on 
alone. 

"Fannie Erving Arundale sent interesting 
accounts of her two sons and four grand- 
children who live not far away. Ruth 
Pringle, still teaching but about to retire to 
her home in Portland, Oregon, sends her 
greetings to 1905 and says: 'During my 
many years of teaching I have been grateful 
to the school. Not just for thoroughness of 
preparation, but the beauty of New England 
and the setting in Andover have left a lasting 
impression upon me.'" 

Best wishes to you all. 

Frances Cutler Knickerbocker 



26 



1909 

l|> Leila Fowler Throckmorton's daughter 
jvvas married last September to James O. 
Fuller. 

Louise Norpell Meek's son, 1st Lt. James 
\W. Meek, is now in Europe. 

Helen Weber Mitchell expects to spend 
(two months in Florence this summer with 
Iher son and daughter-in-law. Her son goes 
levery year to have his sculpture cast in 
iMilan. 

1910 

Eight of our class went back for our 45th 
reunion, and were royally entertained by 
[the school. 

After the Alumnae Meeting we attended 
the breaking of ground for the new gym- 
nasium, and then were entertained for 
luncheon at the school. The Bazaar, and 
Tea (at which we met the charming new 
principal Mrs. Crane) followed; and later we 
had our Class dinner at "Fieldstones". 

Some were unable to stay longer, but 
four of us stayed overnight at Mrs. Bod- 
well's and after breakfast at the Inn, separ- 
ated until the next reunion which we plan 
for 1957. 

The group included Ruth Murray Moore, 
Lydia Skolfield Parsons, Louise Tuttle Abbott, 
Clarissa Hall Hammond, Ruth Newcomb, 
Lillie Johnson Smith, Ethel Kelsey Perry. 

Grace Kellogg 
Reunion Chairman 

1913 

Mildred Bryant Kussmaul has been elected 
president of the Wheelock College Alumnae 
Association. 

1914 

1914's contributions to the Gymnasium 
Fund are not yet what they should be! 40 
members of the class have not responded at 
all. Our percentage is only 29%. After read- 
ing Mr. Hunneman's letter, surely you all 
know your responsibility. 

Your Class Secretary has not been quite 
asleep on her job but has necessarily been 
less active during the past five months as 
regards Abbot 1914. Early in November her 
84-year-old mother broke her hip and has 
been hospitalized most of the time since 
then. This brought to an end sharing a large 
apartment as Mrs. Gleason is now in a Rest 
Home where she can have the needed care 



and attention. Elsie moved on March 1st 
to 65 Long Wharf, Boston 10, where she has 
a delightful apartment with a view of Boston 
Harbor, and only a ten-minute walk (not up 
hill) to her office! The Abbot girls who have 
visited Elsie so far are most enthusiastic 
about it all. A hearty welcome awaits you 
all! 

The Boston Abbot Club-Alumnae Asso- 
ciation mid-winter luncheon was attended 
by Alice Sweeney and Elsie Gleason Sloan 
from 1914 — and we had such a good time 
with some of our contemporaries — Ruth 
Niles Thompson, Louise Thompson Cottrell, 
Esther Sheldon Caldwell, and Elizabeth 
Leach. You who don't make an effort to 
attend these meetings miss a lot of fun. But 
it was sad this year to realize this was Miss 
Hearsey's last appearance as Principal! 

Early in January we had such a nice 
letter from Helen Hanscom Winslow (just too 
late to mention in our February notes). 
Helen's daughter, Sally, is a student at 
Hathaway-Brown School in Cleveland and 
Helen undertook a most enterprising and 
original project for the Christmas Holidays. 
In one of Cleveland's leading banks she 
placed in their children's department an 
eight-foot tree — a blue spruce — decorated 
with figures of story-book characters, such as 
Mother Goose, Peter Rabbit, Raggedy Ann 
& Andy, Heidi, Wizard of Oz, The Nativity, 
etc. — all made from cooky dough, but cut 
so thin and decorated so exactly with the 
colored shiny frosting that the characters 
seem to have verily stepped from the book 
to the tree and become alive. It was a huge 
success, a great drawing attraction for 
hundreds of children to visit the bank ... it 
received much publicity in all the papers and 
she has the contract for another year. Con- 
gratulations, Helen! 

1915 

Thomas Greene, Swarthmore '54, son of 
the late Marion Hamblet Greene, received a 
Fulbright grant and is studying at the Col- 
lege of Europe, Bruges, Belgium. 

1916 

Eugenia Parker is celebrating the 25th 
season of her camp, Blazing Trail. Quite a 
number of Abbot girls have been campers. 
Present staff members are Dorothy Judd 
and Eleanor Tucker, members of the Abbot 
faculty. 



27 



1917 

Elizabeth Bacon Swain's daughter, Lorna, 
is the dietitian at Eugenia Parker's Blazing 
Trail camp. 

Miriam Bacon Chellis' daughter, Caroline, 
was married Nov. 26, 1954, to 2nd Lt. 
Richard L. Dennis. 

1918 

Louise Moore Hood's daughter, Eunice, 
was married in December to Daniel A. 
Barder. Her son, Earle, has his first Wool- 
worth store. Her son, Arthur, is a junior at 
Stanford. Her daughter, Thelma, is married 
and is living in Honolulu. Louise is vice- 
chairman of the U.S.O. committee, and is 
active in the Nevada D.A.R. 

1919 

Thelma Mazey Gager and her husband 
spent the last two months flying completely 
around the world. They stopped at various 
points of interest for short visits. 

1920 

These class notes were contributed by 
Kay Hamblet. 

Julia Abbe Garst Ross sends "her loving 
greetings to all her classmates," from the 
Hotel Allison in Cleveland. 

Peg Ackroyd Hunt came over for the 
famous reunion week end that the girls of 
1920 spent at Edna Dixon Mansur's Rock- 
port summer home last year. Her oldest 
daughter, Sue, is a Sophomore at Wheelock. 
Sally is in private school in N. Y., and Wicky 
will be going away to school in September. 

Marjorie Damon Smith lived in Washing- 
ton, D. C. during the war. Later in Syracuse, 
N. Y. and has now settled on a farm in 
West Buxton, Maine. 

Lucy Ford McCorkindale flew to the '54 
reunion from Sioux City. Her older son, 
Jim, is married in Des Moines, and Tom is 
nearly ready to return home from service 
with the Engineers in Korea. 

Lillian Grumman had a trip to Williams- 
burg, Va., with her sister this spring. She 
spent a busy winter with church work, girl 
scouts, Garden Club and Audubon Society, 
and will go to Weld, Maine for the summer. 

Kay Hamblet visited Ann Hussey in 
Swarthmore in June during her nephew's 
Swarthmore graduation. Talked to Char- 
lotte Vose Clark in Eastchester, N. Y. and 
Dot Tyler in Newburgh, N. Y. Saw Robbie 
in Lakeville, Conn., for 15 minutes. 



28 



Anna Hussey's adopted daughter Theo 
Hussey Field has a daughter, Anne, 6, and a 1 
son, Timothy, 3. Ann writes that "it isn't! 
every old maid that manages to have grand- f 
children." 

Kay Kinney Hecox spent a few weeks with I 
her mother in Sarasota, Fla., last winter. 
In June she visited Banff with her husband. 
A year ago Kay moved to Van Wies Point, ! 
five miles south of Albany, and she extends 
a cordial invitation to any 1920 classmates 
when going up or down the Hudson in their, 
yachts, to look for her near Buoy 63, and to 
stop in. Kay is busy with church, city, and 
community affairs. 

Doris McClintock Taylor sends her best- 
from Manchester, N. H. Her daughter, 
Ann, 22, was graduated from Wheaton int 
1953, and is teaching Nursery School at 
Bennett Junior College. Alson Jr., 20, is a 
Sophomore at Dartmouth, and wants to be ad 
doctor. 

Jean McClive Weaver lives in Snyder, N. Y. j 
Her older son married on returning from* 
Korea and the younger son, a graduate of = 
agricultural school, is running the farm. 

Marjorie Miles Jackson came back for j 
part of the reunion festivities in '54. She is 
living in Mackinac Island, Mich. Her three 
children: Carol has a daughter and lives in i 
Royal Oak, Mich. Younger daughter, 
Barbara, lives in Urbana, 111., and has a 
20-month-old son; Marjorie's son, Jerry, 
has a Ph.D. from Duke University, and is 
doing research at Kingsport, Tenn. From 
Andover, Marjorie headed for Nova Scotia 
and en route to Mich., stopped in to see 
Robbie in Lakeville, Connecticut. 

Muriel Moxley Hubbard has lived 4 years 
in Princeton, N. J. Her husband works fori 
Roebling in Trenton. Daughter, Marcella, 
was graduated in '50 from Mt. Holyoke cum 
laude. Taught two years and has married 
Richard Davidson, M.I.T., and has a 2-year- 
old daughter, Marilyn. 

Helen Polk Barker lives "in a doll house 
built in 1708" in Newport, R. I. Their six 
acres overlook the ocean — add: 'Ogee- 
dankee' Indian for house on the hill, Third 
Beach Road. Son, Dick, is third year at 
Litchfield School in Connecticut. 

Lucy Pratt Rutherford lives in Lansing, 
Mich. Her older daughter, Marjorie, is 
married and lives in Godfrey, 111., when- 
her husband teaches at Monticello Junior 
College. Her younger daughter, a graduate 



of Michigan, is with a travel agency in 
Lansing. Her son, Scott, Jr., is a Senior at 
Dartmouth, and was director of winter 
sports of the D.O.C. Lucy's granddaughter 
is five years old. 

Louise Robinson is in Lakeville, Conn.; 
saw Kay Kinney Hecox and Viv Gowdy Lara- 
bee recently. Vivien has moved to Thomp- 
sonville, Conn. Her son, 18, is in school 
in Maine. Robbie says she's fat and gray 
and hopes to make our 40th. 

Martha Stockwell Mumford 
2760 Johnson St., Corvallis, Oregon 

Mart's husband is professor of Agricultural 
Education atX)regon State College. Oldest 
daughter, Pat, graduated as R.N. from 
Oregon State and is married. Barbara also 
a graduate of Oregon State is doing occu- 
pational therapy. Martha Fay is a Junior 
in H.S. Curtis, Jr. is 8 years old. Mart's 
hobbies besides 21 years in P.T.A., are 
Red Cross Canteen and Bloodmobile, 
Sunday School, Supt., Camp Fire Girls and 
rug hooking. Husband is an ardent rose 
I grower and has won many trophies. 

Dorothy Tyler is in the Home Service 
I Dept. of the Red Cross in Newburgh, N. Y. 
She has done social work since school days. 

Helen B. Wilson is living in Bronxville, 

In. y. 

Peg Worman Thompson's second grand- 

! child, Deborah Ann Edson, arrived April 
11, 1954. 

1921 

Ruth Crossman Houg writes that she be- 
I came a grandmother when a daughter was 
I born to her older daughter, Eugenia. Ruth's 
I son is with the Adjutant General Army 
; Band in Yokohama, and her younger 
j daughter is a junior at the University of 
I California. 

1923 

Annetta Richards Bryant's husband re- 
tired this year after thirty-four years of 
teaching. They are now living in Round 
Pond, Maine. 

1925 

Dear '25ers, 

Although '55 is, of course, "legally speak- 
ing", our reunion year, as you remember we 
decided last year to celebrate then at the 
time of the 125th anniversary. It is too bad 
that more of you couldn't come back then, 
because, despite terrific weather (rain and 



cold) we had a marvelous time. Mac Mc- 
Dougall Hay and I were the only ones who 
were able to go and stay over, but Mittie 
Mittendorjj Seidel and Dot Beeley Marsh and 
Ruth Connolly Burke joined us for part of 
Saturday afternoon. 

This year I expected to be the only re- 
turner, but Manon Wood Hale gave me a 
lovely surprise by arriving in time for the 
Ground Breaking, and she was able to stay 
for lunch and the first part of the Bazaar, 
such a gay, colorful affair. If Dot Beeley 
Marsh hadn't just moved to Tucson, Ari- 
zona, I'm sure she would have been in 
Andover. She did a splendid job as president 
of the Boston Abbot Club, and her quartet, 
which she favored us with at one meeting, 
was outstanding. 

More than ever I wish you all could have 
been back, for the inspiration and joy one 
always feels when at our wonderful school is 
so rewarding and heartwarming. Of course 
this Alumnae Day was a very special day 
with very mingled emotions — sadness at 
Miss Hearsey's leaving, but gladness that 
such a fine successor, Mrs. Crane, has been 
found. You will have accounts of the day in 
this Bulletin, so I will just say, "Do plan 
now to come back in '60, for I'm sure you'll 
say 'Why haven't I done it before'!" 

My best to you all. 

Eunice Huntsman 
Reunion Chairman 

1926 

Gracie Griffin Westman's daughter, Lucy 
Jane, was married last October to Walter 
Adams. 

The class extends its sympathy to Helen 
Larson whose mother died last fall. Helen 
has had Kerry Blue Terriers for 21 years. 
Her kennel is known as Sharonellen Ken- 
nels. Terriers purchased from her were 
taken to South America this winter to intro- 
duce Kerry Blues into that country for the 
first time. Helen writes that she saw Evelyn 
Glidden when she was in New York in 
February for her show of Kerry Blues. 

Dorothy Pease Erickson writes that "Ca- 
milla and John came to our home in Sep- 
tember, 1953, and for a time it took all our 
energy to get used to being a family to- 
gether. Now we are living quite a normal 
life, all the usual ups and downs, crises, and 
unexpected pleasures which children bring. 
Camilla was 12 in February, and John was 



29 



9 in December. They are lively, healthy 
and playful, with all the individuality we 
can ever expect to cope with successfully!" 

1927 

Julie Cross Musk's daughter, Carol, was 
married in April to Leonard C. Mulligan 
of Brunswick, Maine. 

The class extends its sympathy to Margery 
Murray whose mother died last September. 
Margery is still working at the Lawrence- 
ville School. 

Elizabeth Piatt Fletcher's daughter, Doro- 
thy, was married April 30, 1955, to Alan L. 
French. 

1928 

The class extends its sympathy to Susan 
Ripley Ward whose father died April 25, 1955. 

1930 

Hi girls! Our 25th was a perfect reunion. 
We missed you who didn't make it but we 
did enjoy the cards from all of you. Thought 
you might be interested in some news of the 
girls who were there. Grace Hadley Mc- 
Millan now living in Wantagh, N. Y., 
spends most of her time chasing her two- 
year-old daughter. Doris Sturtevant Bacon 
has the youngest class baby at one-and-a- 
half years. Ruth Baker Johnson's daughter, 
Nancy, is graduating this June from Abbot. 
Ruth has a Nursery School in her home for 
thirty children. Her son is married and 
lives in California. Midge Turner Fisher's 
daughter, Janet, is going to Colby Junior 
College next fall. Donna Brace Kroeck 
brought her daughter to become acquainted 
with Abbot. Frances Sullivan Sullivan has 
four young children. Marianna Smith Hile 
came from the longest distance — Indiana. 
Posy Castle Olivetti invited us all to her 
Villa in Italy for our 30th in 1960. 

We had a wonderful day. Went to the 
breaking of the ground ceremony for the 
new Gym and then to the luncheon at 
Abbot. There was a Bazaar and a Tea to 
meet Mrs. Crane in the afternoon. We had a 
cocktail party at Bubby Healey Holland's, 
who is still in Andover with her husband 
and two children, Peter, age 9, and Betsy, 
age 8. Then on to Fieldstones for dinner. 
We all look the same as we did 25 years ago! 
Anyway, one thing has not changed and 
that is our "gift of gab." Abbot_is still my 



choice and I am delighted my daughter 
Judy, has picked it for '59. 

Libby Tarr Morsel 
Reunion Chairman 
The class extends its sympathy to Eliza- 
beth Dean Ballou whose husband died sud-' 
denly in April. 

The class will be sorry to learn that Helen 
Ripley's father died in April. 
Married 
Betty Quinby Johnson to Edward Lincoln 
Parmelee, Jr., June 12, 1954. 

1932 

Born 
To Clare O'Connell Sullivan, a sixth child 
and fifth son, Brian Jerome, April 19, 1955. 

1935 

Very much in the picture at the class oi' 
'35 reunion (their 20th) were the beaming 
and familiar faces of Cathleen Burns Elmer, 
Tubby (the nickname is still an anachronism) 
Chamberlain MacCready, Sue Hildreth Good- 
win, Ellie Johnson DuToit, and Frannie 
McTernen Coan. Everybody was thrilled to 
see Liz Morgan Foster, Claire Oppenheim 
Marum, and Margit Thony also in this 
year's lineup and agreed it had been much 
too long between yaks in all three cases. 
Sue's nice husband, Ed, furnished (all by | 
himself) a necessary masculine equilibrium I 
at Saturday's dinner meeting at Levaggi's. I 
Though a quorum was not present, he is I 
surely entitled, by virtue of sheer charm and I 
fortitude, to an honorary membership in the j 
class of '35. Let's hope he set a precedent I 
that will become an epidemic in 1960! 

My very best to all at Abbot. 

Faithfully, 
Cathleen Burns Elmer j 
Reunion Chairmany 

Betsy Armington Arms writes that her 
husband has left teaching for writing and 
public relations work. 

Evelyn Chappell Swayze writes that she 
has four children. She met Anne Humphreys 
Hammond in New York this spring. Anne 
was sightseeing with her two daughters. 

Ann Cutler Brecheen writes, "I just man- 
aged to have my first baby, a girl, Leigh, 
who is seven weeks old. Mother is playing 
tennis again." 

Jane Dawes McClennan plans to move to 
Lexington, Mass. at the close of the school 
year. Her husband is opening a G.E. office 
there. 



30 



Susan Hildreth Goodwin said: "...have 
had quite a bout with whooping cough! 
Luckily nobody else caught it. Am certainly 
glad spring is here at last." 

Ruth Hollands Ranger has three children, 
Joanne, 12, Holly, 4, and Ricky, 2. 

Helen (Pekin) McDonald wrote "Hope you 
all have a wonderful time, but naturally 
I won't be there. Was East last fall and 
visited Ellie Johnson DuToit, who brought 
me up to date on all the news. Do give my 
best to everyone." 

Katharine Scudder Fraser wrote of our 
20th (which she had to miss), "sounds like 
a lot of fun, but I am about to produce 
No. 4 any day now." 

Shirley Smith King writes, "I hate to miss 
the 20th, but my husband and I are sailing 
April 13th for a trip to the Holy Land, and 
on May 6-8 expect to be in Athens, Greece. 
My greetings to all the class." 

Rosamond Taylor Jensen writes, "Sorry I 
can't make the reunion. I have three boys, 
12, 9, and 5. My husband was stricken with 
polio in 1952 and is at home now with rock- 
ing bed and chest piece, so you can see I 
am busy. Would love to hear from you all." 

Cecile Van Peursem Lane writes, "I have 
three boys, David, 11, Dickie, 8, and Bobby, 
5. All three are baseball fiends — I'm still 
waiting for one to show an interest in music! 
We live in an old 7-room house with an 
acre of ground and love all the room — we 
have a big garden, two rabbits and a cat. 
Best wishes to all." 

1937 

The class extends its sympathy to Jean 
Nevius whose father died suddenly while she 
was in Andover for Alumnae Day. 
Born 

To Ellen Simpson Martin, a fourth child 
and second daughter, Anne Mitchell, 
Sept. 4, 1954. 

To Grace Vibberts Conlin, a second child 
and first son, Edward J., Ill, Sept. 25, 1954. 
Phronsie Ann is 2 3^. 

1938 

The class extends its sympathy to Anne 
Simpson White whose mother died last 
December. 

Born 

To Jane Vogt Cooke, a second daughter, 
Margaret, July 17, 1954. Jane's daughter, 
Katherine, is 10 years old. Jane's husband is 



working in the New York office of the 
General Electric Company. 

1939 

Joan Hubbard Lawson's husband has been 
transferred to world headquarters of Inter- 
national Business Machines. He is assistant 
Vice-president of manufacturing. Joan is 
moving to Scarsdale in July. 
Married 

Mary Curtis to Maestro Ettore Verna, 
August 3, 1954, in Switzerland. Maestro 
Verna was Mary's teacher, and has a studio 
in New York. 

Eleanor Martin Townson to Robert B. W. 
Chatfield of Cincinnati, Ohio, April 30, 
1955. Mr. Chatfield is a graduate of St. 
Mark's School, the University of Michigan 
and Harvard University. 
Born 

To Marjorie MacMullen Brewer, a second 
son, Charles William, Oct. 1, 1954. 

1940 

For all those who missed reunion this 
year, let me say that it was a delightful oc- 
casion. Nine of our class returned and the 
weather couldn't have been better. Abbot 
went all out, as usual, in welcoming back 
her alumnae — with lunch and dinner 
'on the house' ! 

Many thanks to all those who sent in 
pictures of themselves for Miss Hearsey's 
album. It was a complete surprise to her 
and she was obviously very pleased. The 
album is nowhere near complete, so, if you 
can, those of you who missed out on the 
first call, send the snapshots to the Alumnae 
Office and Miss Hearsey will get them. The 
new reunion chairman for our 20th (hor- 
rors!) is Elaine Dairy mple Borowski. Yours 
truly was elected Class Fund Secretary. 

Now for the news which I gleaned from 
your postal cards: 

Marietta Meyer Ekberg writes: "Bill is a 
civilian now working in the TV station here. 
North Dakota agrees with all of us. Judy 
now 6, Nancy B. 2Y 2 , and Marietta Ruth, 
5 months, keep us busy and happy." 

Suzanne Chadwick Bush's address has 
changed to 339 Ruby St., Laguna Beach, 
Calif. 

Sue Place Duncan has a boy 1^ named 
David Alan who keeps life lively for her 
daughters, 4 and 6^ years. 



3 1 



Jeanne Cowles Wilson's new address is 
26 East 81st St., New York, N. Y. She and 
her husband have recently adopted a second 
child, a boy, 1. Their little girl is 3. 

Mary Spaulding Powell writes that she is 
expecting a baby in May. She lives near 
Williamsburg and would love to see anyone 
who comes that way. 

Libby Travis Sollenberger writes that her 
husband is working at the Pentagon and 
will be there for another two years. 

Doris Sawyer Hoar has won an award in 
her first public exhibition in Boston. She 
also has sold several of her paintings. 

Joan Carlson Hutchison regretted not being 
able to come to reunion, but she is waiting 
the arrival of her third child in May so 
had to stay close to home. 

Mollie Chase Foster 
Reunion Chairman 
Born 

To Marietta Meyer Ekberg, a third 
daughter, Marietta Ruth, Dec. 29, 1954. 

1941 

Susan Woodman McSherry writes that 
her husband is taking a position as assistant 
professor of Anaesthesiology at Jefferson 
Medical School in Philadelphia in July. 

Born 
To Nancy Whittier Atkinson, a son, Ralph 
Edward, March 27, 1955. 

1942 

Pam Bolton Henderson's husband will 
teach at the University of North Carolina 
next year. 

Born 

To Elsie Williams Kehaya, a daughter, 
Elizabeth Williams, March 21, 1955. 

1943 

Marilyn Tapper Mountain's husband is an 
intern at Billings Hospital of the University 
of Chicago Clinics. He starts his residency 
there in July under Dr. Lester Dragstead 
who performed the operation on the Siamese 
twins recently. Mallie has a daughter, 
Karen, 4, and a son, Chippy, 20 months. 

Born 

To Jean Hansen Ashbaugh, a second son, 
Hans Edward, Dec. 30, 1954. 

To Margaret Howard Long, a daughter, 
Oct. 14, 1954. 



1944 

Charlotte Leland is now working as a 
medical secretary in Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 
She spent three weeks in the British West 
Indies this spring. 

Betty Reid Buzby's husband has resigned 
from Standard Oil, S.A., and is now working 
for A. G. Spaulding Co. Betty writes, "In 
one-and-a-half years in the tropics we were 
moved five times, and had plenty of oppor- 
tunity to see the Guatemalan revolution and 
the assassination of Remon of Panama. All 
very exciting, but we're glad to be back in< 
the U. S. A."' 

Born 

To Elisabeth Colson Tierney, a second 
child and first daughter, Elisabeth Ann, 
Jan. 12, 1955. 

To Betty Frank Abeles, a fourth child and 
second son, Clifford Frank, March 8, 1955. 

To Louise Honnen Tutt, a son, Russell 
Thayer, Jr., Feb. 27, 1955. 

To Alma Mastrangelo Strabala, a second 
child and first son, Gary Francis, Feb. 12, 
1955. 

To Emily McMurray Mead, a son, Edgar 
Thorn, III, Feb. 1, 1955. 



1945 

Barbara Beecher is working for a Junior 
College teaching credential in California. 
She hopes to combine teaching with writ- 
ing. 

Married 

Andree Luce to Jack Cooney in March, 
1955. 

Born 

To Ann Dorsel Monroe, a third child and 
first son, Dec. 2, 1954. Ann and her family 
are now living in Cincinnati, Ohio, after 
2>}/2 years of living in England. She lives 
across the street from Barbara Graf Robin- 
son '46, and very near Patsy Pettingill Whits 
aker '42. 

To Edith Walker Upham, a third daugh- 
ter, Sherrard Douglas, Feb. 21, 1955. 

1946 

Barbara Biddle ran a ski lodge at Stow, 
Vt., this past winter. 

Nancy Burns Brelis writes that she has 
three daughters, Doran, 4, Jane, l}/£, and 
Cynthia 6 months. Nancy's husband has 
resigned from Life and Time to write a novel 



32 



Engaged 
Patricia Hogan to Jean-Francois Haudu- 
troy of Paris, France. Mr. Hauduroy was 
educated in Paris and Lausanne. 

Born 
To Barbara Graf Robinson, a third 
daughter, Barbara Bye, Nov. 20, 1954. 

1917 

Margot Meyer sailed March 8 for Europe. 
She plans to spend a year traveling in 
[Europe, North Africa, and the Middle East. 

Joyce Huntington Knights and her hus- 
band flew to Europe April 24, and plan to 
spend a month touring. 

Tish Rodgcrs is doing professional singing 
in New York. 

Nancy Scripture Garrison's husband is 
vice-president of the New England Con- 
fectionery Co. 

Christine von Goeben Curtis writes, "Late 

in October I was thrown off Hedda's horse 

land landed in the hospital with a concussion 

and fractured skull — not too bad. Then 

'two weeks later I was off to Seattle and 

'thence Tokyo. Traveling was safe as long as 

I didn't have heavy bags or hit my head. 

So far no bad results and I feel terribly 

lucky. 

"Finally, I sailed on the General M. M. 
j Patrick — an overgrown bath tub — and 
we landed in Yokohama, Dec. 9th. The 
trip was rough — storms, typhoons, and all 
the rest. We saw no land for 14 days!!! As 
[far as I know the ship went backwards half 
the time. John's illness brought him out of 
Korea to Tokyo for two years and for that 
I can be thankful. 

"Tokyo is fascinating. As yet I'm learning 
my way around slowly. We have a Japanese 
place — a small apartment — semi- Western, 
which means hot and cold running water 
and a western bathroom. Very few places 
here have those. Keeping house is a circus. 
The electricity goes off periodically, the 
gas goes up and down, and the earthquakes 
rock the whole place. Our Kobe Juku 
Mitsubishi ice box — acquired from the 
Air Force — sounds like a generator — but 
it freezes things at least. 

"The Japanese are wonderful people and 



as wedon'l live on a base I 've gotten to know 
the various trades people. The gas man 

came to (ix the gas and dirtied the floor on 
coming through the house. He bowed so 
low in pardon I thought his head would 
touch the floor. Then the water man came 
to repair the faucet and in doing so water 
went all over the ceiling and walls. He said 
something in Japanese and I assumed he 
wanted a rag. When finished he washed out 
the rag! and bowed all the way out. If only 
I spoke this language all would be simpler. 
The people are very quiet — polite — and 
friendly when you are friendly to them. 
They never make a lot of noise when on the 
streets — except Christmas eve, when they 
were all out drunk! (They celebrate New 
Year's instead of Christmas — and at 
home.) Poverty is predominant here and no 
one appears to be wealthy. They are ex- 
tremely hard workers — and use everything 
they have — every bit of land. Also they 
are always washing out their houses — due 
to coal dust one must do that. 

"Because of their mode of fertilization 
they grow the most wonderful fruit and 
vegetables here. These are quite safe to eat 
if peeled or soaked in clorax 30 minutes and 
then cooked. Apples are all the size of small 
grapefruits — no carrot or radish is normal 
unless two feet long and heads of cabbage 
are the size of footballs! Also their beef is 
tops — that's because they go out into the 
fields and massage the cattle everyday! 
It helps their (the cattle's) digestion. Of 
course the fish is good. However, often eggs 
and pork taste of fish. That is because the 
chickens and pigs eat fish. What we don't get 
on the market we can get in the commissary 
— but fresh foods from the states are awful. 
I guess the 5000-plus miles don't do anything 
for taste. 

"Tokyo is amazingly modern. I'm not 
sure what I epxected. But there are large, 
modern department stores, specialty shops, 
coffee houses, pastry shops, top notch res- 
taurants and hotels, and of course dirt and 
poverty. The city at night is lit with signs 
more lovely than New York's Broadway. 
The first couple of days I did nothing but 
stare at everything. The subway system 



Christine von Goeben Curtis '47 has sent to the Abbot library books 
on Japanese life. 



33 



here is better than any I've ever seen except 
signs are mostly in Japanese. We live on the 
outskirts of town and it took me one whole 
afternoon to find my way back via subway. 
Finally one of the ticket agents understood 
my meager Japanese. Then he sold me a 
ticket and told me to change at Shinjuku. 
"No," I told him — "Shimbashi." Finally 
he conferred with another man and said I 
was right. Evidently something like that 
messes up the Japanese railroad accounts — 
but I knew as I'd gone down in the morning 
easily. There are so few signs in English one 
must remember how many stops one is 
from the down town area. Also — very few 
streets are marked. Even the Japanese don't 
know addresses. One must go to the nearest 
police box to be directed — all in Japanese. 
Sometimes they don't even know. 

"Driving over here is an experience. They 
drive on the left, and like maniacs. At first 
I was scared, but then I got to like it all. 
You just step on the gas, blow the horn and 
go. In our area there are no sidewalks so 
children and old people are always all over 
the street. We live one block down from a 
very narrow street. The only way to get 
through is to go to the beginning and if no 
one is coming — blow the horn and hope. 
More fun. 

"As you can well see life here is interesting. 
There is plenty to see and do. The art here is 
lovely — and all life centers on simplicity. 
I do like it. We live right next to the largest 
cemetery in Tokyo and thus have learned a 
lot of what happens when people die. This 
is also advantageous for buying flowers — an 
essential in a Japanese home. We went to 
one small temple — and I loved seeing it. 
In the spring we'll go to Kyoto and Nara — ■ 
the old capital — and Osaka, the com- 
mercial city. It will all be very interesting. 

"Must sign off now — I hope 1955 is a 
good year. 

Sincerely, "Sayonara" — 
Chris 

Engaged 

Cynthia Austin to Charles Daniel Dunkin 
of New York. Mr. Dunkin is a graduate of 
Columbia College and is continuing his 
studies at Columbia University. 

Virginia Eason to John Giffen Weinmann 
of New Orleans. Mr. Weinmann is a gradu- 
ate of Metaire Park Country Day School, 
New Orleans, Tulane University, and 
Tulane College of Law. where he was 



34 



elected to the board of editors of the Tulane 
Law Review. 

Born 
To Patricia Carroll Dunsmore, a third 
child and second daughter, Theresa Anne, 
Dec. 20, 1954. 

1948 

Estelle DuBois Hoy writes that she has 
three children, Susan, 23^, David, \y 2 , and 
Georgene, 2 months. 

Tania Russell Potter and her husband 
have adopted a son, Matthew Phillips. 

Debby Voss Howard writes that she has 
two daughters, Karen Ann, 23^, and Susan 
Lynn, 12 months. Her husband is at Har- 
vard Medical School in the Department of 
Pharmacology where he has a research 
grant. 

Engaged 

Eleanor Parker to Lt. (j.g.) Paul S. Cush- 
man, USN, of Glen Falls, N. Y. Lt. Cush- 
man is a graduate of Lowell Technological 
Institute and the Officer Candidate School 
of Newport, R. I. 

Charlotte Stone to George L. Wolf of 
Mansfield, Ohio. Charlotte is teaching first 
grade in Cleveland, and her fiance is now 
in the Army in San Francisco. They plan to 
be married in June. 

Married 

Grace De Long to Richard Carlton Ein- 
sel, April 23, 1955, in Reading, Pa. 

Martha Grimshaw to Lt. (j.g.) Arthur 
Clark Bivens of Tampa, Fla., Nov. 27, 1954. 
Lt. Bivens is a graduate of the U. S. Naval 
Academy. 

Born 

To Anne Bergh Hull-Ryde a second 
daughter, Deborah Kay, Jan. 31, 1955. 

To Alicia Cooper Wright, a third child and 
second son, Frederick Cooper, Mar. 2, 1955. 

To Barbara Dake Johnson, a son, Peter 
Bradford, April 25, 1955. 

To Barbara Sugar Connor, a son, James 
Howard, Jr., April 8, 1955- 

1949 

Mercy Barnes has been in the Navy for 
three years. She is at the training center in 
San Diego. 

Freddy Brown has been in Hartford for 
two years working as an apprentice to the 
Director of Religious Education at the 
Episcopal Cathedral. 



Sally Nesbitt Reese writes that her husband 
is getting out of the Army in June, and they 
' plan to spend the summer in Europe. 

Jane Woolverton is working for the Red 
Cross at the National Headquarters in the 
Junior Red Cross. She is working on the 
International Album, Music and Art Pro- 
grams. She is also attending Art School. 
Engaged 

Sally J. Gibbs to George Sachs, USA, of 
New York and San Paulo, Brazil. Mr. 
Sachs studied at St. Georges School in 
Europe, Perkiomen Preparatory School in 
Pennsylvania, Emery University and Co- 
lumbia College. 

1950 

The class of 1950 didn't make a very 
good showing at its 5th reunion this year. 
Only three of us showed up — Joan Aldrich, 
Mary Bixby Lamb, and Betsy Goodspeed 
Fellner. However, there was good reason 
for the absenteeisms. We are spread all over 
the 48 states, mainly much too far to come 
back to Andover, and a remarkable number 
of us are planning our weddings or are tak- 
ing care of small babies. 

Therefore, our class treasure remains 
buried. Perhaps at our 10th reunion we will 
have more present and can dig it up then. 
Three people, we decided, were not enough 
to justify it this year. 

Several girls sent pictures. If any of you 
forgot and would like to send one, please 
don't hesitate to send it directly to Miss 
Hearsey. She'd be delighted to receive it. 

Betsy Goodspeed Fellner 
Reunion Chairman 

Cindy Atwood Couch's husband is working 
as a sales engineer for the Torrington Com- 
pany. She and her husband will be in South 
Bend next year. 

Pat Barry Burbank is teaching the third 
grade in South Lansing, N. Y. Her husband 
is finishing college in Ithaca. 

Jane Currier is teaching at Rock Point 
School for Girls in Burlington, Vt. 

Anne Dunsford Hockmeyer is in Germany 
with her husband who is in the service. 

Robbie Ann Gibbon Coates writes that she 
has moved to Kansas City. Her second 
daughter was born in March. 

Libby Moss is studying for her master's 
degree at the University of Georgia. She 
plans to spend three months abroad this 
summer. 



Engaged 

Elizabeth Bradley to Charles Joseph Hub- 
bard of New York. Mr. Hubbard, graduate 
of Milton Academy, received B.S. and M.S. 
degrees from Harvard, where lie is studying 
for his doctorate. 

Nancy Gray to Joseph Newton Sherrill, 
Jr. Mr. Sherrill is studying at Harvard Law 
School. 

Coralie Huberth to Samuel Sloan of New 
York. Mr. Sloan is an alumnus of the Sole- 
bury School, New Hope, Pa. He is now a 
senior at Princeton. 

Margaret Lurton to Robert Vinton Kahle 
of Bronxville, N. Y. Mr. Kahle is a member 
of the class of 1955 at the Sibley College of 
Mechanical Engineering at Cornell. He will 
receive a commission in the Air Force in 
June. 

Married 

Nora Johnson to Leonard Siwek of Chi- 
cago, Feb. 19, 1955, in New York. Mr. 
Siwek, who was in the Army in World War 
II, is a graduate of Northwestern University 
and the School of Advanced International 
Studies in Washington, and attended the 
School of Oriental Studies in Cairo, Egypt. 
He is a member of the government relations 
staff of the Arabian American Oil Co. 

Mary Louise Lester to Homer B. Clark, 
Jr., Dec. 22, 1954. Sandra C. Smith was 
maid of honor. Mr. Clark is attending the 
University of California. 
Born 

To Barbara Baldwin Potter, a second son, 
Steven Brandeth, Dec. 31, 1954. 

To Georgette Davis Ferrante, a son, 
Giovanni, Nov. 4, 1954. Gette's husband has 
been in the Army since January. 

To Frances Lyon Leach, a daughter, Eliza- 
beth Whiting, Oct. 7, 1954. 

To Nancy Shulze Lamb, a son, William 
Smith, Apr. 11, 1955. 

1951 

Joan Morrison is a second-year student at 
the New England Baptist Hospital School 
of Nursing. 

Engaged 

Dorothy Colburn to David Rice of Wall- 
ingford, Conn. Mr. Rice, who graduated 
from Phillips Exeter Academy, is a senior at 
Yale. He expects to receive a commission in 
the Marine Corps after his graduation. 

Lydia L. Eccles to Lt. John Mogan Page, 
U.S.A.F. of Landover, Md. Lt. Page was 



35 



graduated from Virginia Episcopal School, 
Lynchburg, Va., and attended Dartmouth 
College. He served with the United Na- 
tions Forces in Korea. 

Abbie E. Emmons to Donald Wells Pen- 
field of Winnetka, 111. Mr. Penfield was 
graduated from Millbrook Academy and is 
a senior at Trinity College. 

Barbara J. Gibson to Roy William Roth of 
Collingswood, N. J. Mr. Roth is a graduate 
of M.I.T. He received his M.S. at the Uni- 
versity of Michigan, and completed his 
Ph.D. at M.I.T. this year. He is now em- 
ployed at the American Cyanamid Co. in 
Stamford, Conn. Barbara is planning to 
attend the Sorbonne this summer and to 
enter the Yale Graduate School in the fall 
where she has just been awarded a Ford 
Foundation fellowship. 

Married 
Sally Dower to Jack Saglio, June, 1954. 
Mr. Saglio is a graduate of Tufts College 
and is now a student at Tufts Medical 
School. 

Born 
To Barbara Wood Emmons, a third child 
and second son, Christopher Wood, Feb. 
28, 1955. 

1952 

Anisia Allen spent her Easter vacation 
traveling through Italy. She writes that she 
has enjoyed her year in Paris tremendously. 
She plans to study at Boston University next 
year. 

Susan Hunter is spending her junior year 
in Italy. Next year she will study at the 
American University of Beirut. Her father 
has a position with the United Nations in 
Beirut, and Susan will live with her family 
there. 



Engaged 

Patricia Kotraschek to Rev. Robert H. 
Pierce of Freeport, Long Island. Mr. Pierce 
graduated from Queens College and the 
Berkeley Divinity School in New Haven. He 
is assistant rector of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church in Freeport, L. I. 

Helen Neisser to Fernando Modenesi 
La Rosa of Paris. Helen plans to be married 
in Evanston, 111., in June, and to finish col- 
lege next year at Northwestern. 
Married 

Barbara Church to Albert L. Sheffer, 
Aug. 21, 1954. Barbara is attending Ameri- 
can University in Washington majoring in 
Political Science, and her husband is in 
Medical School at George Washington 
University. 

1953 

Engaged 
Harriet K. Van Dusen to Horton Sidney 
Spitzer of Southport, Conn. Mr. Spitzer is 
an alumnus of Hotchkiss School and is a 
senior at Yale. 

1954 

Pat Sanborn expects to spend the summer 
working for the American Friends Service 
Committee in a work camp for migrant 
workers in Pennsylvania. 

Patti Skillin is on the Freshman class 
executive committee at Mount Holyoke. 

Molly Young sang the part of Josephine in 
Pinafore produced by the U. S. Coast Guard 
Academy at New London. 

Engaged 
Patricia Stainton to Dale Frederick Roue 
of New York City. Mr. Rowe attended 
Manumit School and was graduated from 
Goddard College in Plainfield, Vt. 



Cum Laude 1955 



Louise Nesbit Bell 
Janet Starr Best 
Ann Cannon Clark 
Nancy Elizabeth Eastham 
Eleanor Marie Easton 
Margaret Henderson Holbrook 



Mary Ann Holden 
Gretchen Abigail Jordan 
Katharine Jane Lloyd 
Mary Sophia Minard 
Natalie Ellen Smissaert 
Mary Ann Yudicky 



36 



WUati, A/ecu? 

2/gki Afame? l/aWi AddieU? 

Please send news items to the Alumnae Oflice, Abbot Academy, Andover, 
Mass., before September 15, 1955. 



Today's date 

Maiden Name Class . 

Married Name 

Address 



Postal Zone 




Sent by the School to all Abbot Girls 



ABBOT ACADEMY BULLETIN 

Series 22 SEPTEMBER, 1955 Issue 4 



Change of Address 
Issue 



Published four times yearly. October, February. May. and September, by Abbot Acad- 
emy, Andover, Massachusetts. 

Entered as second class matter December 12, 1933. at the post office at Andover, Mass- 
achusetts, under the act of August 24, 191 2. 



Changes of Address Since February 

Bulletin 

Suggestion: Attach this to your 1952 Register. 



1879 
Weeks, F. Adelaide 

Vineyard Haven Rest Home, Vineyard Haven, 
Mass. 

1885 
Jones, Mary P. Aff. 

Mrs. Albert Sauveur 

171 Marsh St., Belmont 78, Mass. 

1888 
Dow, Esther A. Aff. 

Mrs. Harry P. Ball 

% C. L. Ball, Apt. 5D, 320 E. 53rd St., New 
York 22, N. Y. 

1891 
Himes, Harriet E. Aff. 
Mrs. John E. Flack 
The Caldwell, Troy, N. Y. 

1895 
Dorr, Grace W. Aff. 

245 Main St., Groveland, Mass. 
Farrington, Louise Aff. 

Mrs. Joseph F. Hoyt 

Colonial Apartment Hotel, La Jolla, Calif. 
Johnson, Flora Aff. 

1673 Columbia Rd., N.W., Washington, D. C. 

1896 
Young, May A. 

Mrs. James E. Duffy 

900 Wells Court, Bay City, Mich. 

1897 
Haley, Dora Aff. 

Mrs. Willis McDuffee 

4465 Randall Rd., Riverside, Calif. 
Locke, Alison 

Box 446, Jacksonville, Fla. 
Spaulding, Marion Aff. 

Mrs. W. Armington Potter 

78 Wakefield St., Rochester, N. H. 

1898 
Walker, Mary Ella Aff. 

Mrs. M. Walker Leach 
50 Commonwealth Ave., Boston 16, Mass. 
Woodward, Marion Aff. 

Mrs. Philip E. Perry 

8 Birtwell Rd., Lexington, Mass. 

1899 
Hershey, Marie 

Mrs. Charles K. Bliss 
123 106th Ave. S.E., Bellevue, Wash. 
Paine, Elizabeth E. 

Mrs. Paine Collins 

513 5th Ave., New York 17, N. Y. 

1900 
Gutterson, Constance R. 

Mrs. Horace Taylor 
2301 State St., Santa Barbara, Calif. 
Manning, Arline Aff. 

Mrs. James J. Brainard 

120 Ruskin Ave., Pittsburgh 13, Penna. 

1901 
Holt, Charlotte A. 

Mrs. Paul R. Burtt 

891 Broadway, East Providence 14, R. I. 

1903 
Reid, Harriet Aff. 

Mrs. William Stewart 

19 Brookside Dr., Spring Glen, Hamden 17, 
Conn. 

1904 
Dcppen, Clara N. Aff. 

Mrs. Edward J. Ayars 

135 Maiden Terr., Elizabeth, N. J. 
Reed, Esther Aff. 

Mrs. George Fuller 

596 North County Rd., Palm Beach, Fla. 



1905 
Pringle, Ruth H. 

3110 S.W. 36th Ave., Portland 1, Ore. 
Roberts, Ruth Aff. 

Mrs. Franklin Warden 

995 So. Orange Ave., Apt. A, Pasadena 2, Calif, 

1906 
Deeble, Elizabeth Aff. 

178 East Main St., Westminster, Md. 

1907 
Arens, Ethel A. 

Mrs. Walworth Tyng 
Rt. 3, Cambridge, Md. 
Peebles, Harriet Aff. 

Mrs. Sumner S. Boal 

1405 Eagle Vista Dr., Los Angeles 41, Calif. 

1908 
Cole, Marion 

Mrs. J. Burleigh Cheney 

118 Arnold Ave., Providence, R. I. 

1909 
Gardner, Edith H. 

Mrs. Ray W. Tobey 
Pine Cone Farm, Fairfield, Maine 
Gilbert, Mary Rell 

Mrs. William C. McBride 
1200 South Lee St., Lodi, Calif. 

1912 
Fitch, Marjorie Aff. 

Mrs. John A. Waite 

96 Main St., Bridgewater, Mass. 

1913 
McLaughlin, Kathryn Aff. 

Mrs. James C. Barry 

241 Alexander St., Rochester 7, N. Y. 

1914 
Rlood, Helen V. Aff. 

Mrs. Helen B. Gurshin 

34 Broad St., Lynn, Mass. 
Gleason, Elsie G. 

Mrs. Elsie G. Sloan 

65 Long Wharf, Boston 10, Mass. 
Gutterson, Hildegarde 

Mrs. Hildegarde Smith 

2301 State St., Santa Barbara, Calif. 
Koons, Rhea Aff. 

Mrs. Wilbur Van Arsdol 

RR 1, Box 125, Muncie, Ind. 
Murray, Gladys Louise Aff. 

Mrs. Dennett D. Rodliff 

5 Park St., Brookline, Mass. 
Sjostrom, Olga L. Aff. 

28 Chestnut St., Andover, Mass. 

1915 
Gilbert, Dorothy Aff. 

Mrs. Lyman H. Bellows 
660 Walden, Winnetka, 111. 

1916 
Collins. Ardiss M. Aff. 

Mrs. William Betts 

49 Garden St., Boston 14, Mass. 

1917 
Brown, Phyllis E. Aff. 

Mrs. Andrew T. Banczvk 

P.O. Box 1464, Idyllwild, Calif. 
Hungerford, Esther W. 

Mrs. Verton L. Staub 

103 So. Evergreen St.. Clearwater, Fla. 
Littlefield, Julia A. Aff. 

P.O. Box 36, Brewer, Maine 



1918 



Davis, Mary F. 

Mrs. George A. Irwin 
Cornish Flat, N. H. 



Eddy, Sally Aff. 

Mrs. Sallv E. Tripp 

1133 Midland Ave., Apt. E-2, Bronxville, N. Y. 
Ken yon, Beatrice 

Mrs. William H. Midgley 

Manters Point, Plymouth, Mass. 
Lindsay, Lois A. 

U S.A. Special Services. The Army Arctic ( enter, 
APO 733, Seattle, Wash. 
[VlcPherson, Marion R. 

47 Carmel Rd., Andover, Mass. 
Perry, June AfT. 

29 Prospect Ave., Greenfield, Mass. 
Swalm, Martlia C. Aff. 

Mrs. Timothy E. Holden 

8 Maryland Ave., Middletown, N. Y. 

1919 
(lark. Margaret 

Mrs. Woodbury K. Howe 

179 Osgood St., North Andover, Mass. 
Flett, Mary U. AfT. 

Mrs. G. Dewey Swan 

Stanwich Rd., Cos Cob, Conn. 
Nbyes, H. Kathreen 

Mrs. Charles H. Pettit 

95 Dudley Rd., Newton Centre, Mass. 

1920 
Abbe. Julia 

Mrs. Merrill M. Ross 

35 Hancock St., Boston 14, Mass. 
Ford, Lucy 

Mrs. William A. McCorkindale 

3030 Douglass St., Sioux City, Iowa 
Lyon. Jean D. 

Mrs. Gurendra Dhawan 

18 Lower Sloane St., London S.W., England 
McClive. Jean A. 

Mrs. John R. Weaver 

R.F.D. 1, Middleport, N. Y. 
Warren, Georgia Aff. 

Mrs. Brownlee B. Gauld 

701 Crest Dr., Tucson, Ariz. 

1921 
Stevens, Elizabeth Aff. 

Mrs. Ogden Cook 

340 Greenwood, Glencoe, 111. 
Talcott, Mary A. 

Mrs. Dwight K. Luster 

R.F.D., Sharon, Conn. 
Thompson, Henrietta 

Mrs. Edgar R. Beal 

54 South State Rd.. Briarcliff Manor, N. Y. 
Voorhees, Eleanor C. 

52 North Stanworth Dr., Princeton, N. J. 

1922 
Hemingway, Virginia Aff. 

Mrs. George Spayde 

108 W. Garfield, Charlevoix, Mich. 
Kirkham, Lois Aff. 

Mrs. Stanley Hart 

51 Chatham Rd., Kensington, Conn. 
Weeks. Kathrine M. 

Mrs. Webster E. Plaisted 

Meredith, N. H. 
Welborn, Susana 

Mrs. Welborn Osborn 

2614 St. Johns Ave., Apt. 3, Jacksonville, Fla. 

1923 
Richards, Annetta 

Mrs. Herbert L. Bryant 
Round Pond, Maine 
Tavlor, Dorothy A. 

Mrs. Waller B. Booth, Jr. 

% Mr. W. B. Booth, 1311 Walnut St., Owens- 
boro, Ky. 
Wright, Raymah T. 

Mrs. James J. Sutherland 

1193 Menlo Dr., Altadena, Calif. 

1924 
Bragg, Elizabeth K. 

Mrs. Douglas B. Macintosh 

7116 First Ave. So., St. Petersburg, Fla. 
Judd, Melinda 

Mrs. Philip Fosburg 

3706 Ethel Ave., Muncie, Ind. 
Korst, Bessie K. Aff. 

Mrs. Robert B. King 

30445 W. 6 Mile, Levonia, Mich. 



1 92. r > 
Bailey, Evelyn B. 

1 1 Appletree Lane, Andover, Ma 
Beeley, Dorothj 

Mrs. Robert H. Marsh 
R.F.D. Rt. 6, Box 130, Tucson, Ariz. 
Boutwell, Madelaine G. 

Mrs. Roland von Webei 
Mont Vernon, N. H. 
Gasser, Josephine Aff. 

Mrs. Elwood E. Hansen 

720 N. Elm St., Beverly Hills, Calif. 
liar I. Ruth Aff. 

Mrs. G. Adolph Stein. Jr. 

% Creole Petroleum Corp., Las Piedras, Estado 
Falcon, Venezuela, S. A. 
Potter, Barbara Aff. 

Mrs. Wharton E. Earned 

1418 Allenford, Los Angeles 49, Calif. 
Pritchard, Nettie I). Aff. 

Mrs. Norris W. Potter, Jr. 

1930 Kakela Dr., Honolulu, Hawaii 

1926 
Bloomer, Helen Aff. 

Mrs. R. B. Hanley 

4571 Narragansett Ave., San Diego 7, Calif. 
Donald, Jean J. 

Mrs. Worth F. Manus 

Pineacres, Holcombe Bridge Rd., Norcross, Ga. 
Farrington, Ruth 

607 North Fillmore St., Arlington 1, Va. 
Perkins, Priscilla 

Mrs. Lawrence R. Leach 

10 Benjamin St., Old Greenwich, Conn. 

1927 
Burns, Betty Lee 

Mrs. Daniel W. Layman, Jr. 

445 Madeline Dr., Pasadena, Calif. 
Cutler, Margaret T. 

Mrs. Clarke Espy 

2340 17th St. West, Billings, Mont. 
Keany, Katharine J. 

1675 Wisconsin Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 
Mead, Katherine K. Aff. 

Mrs. Edward A. Herrick 

East Jaffrey, N. H. 
Murray, Margery Aff. 

49 Palmer Square West, Princeton, N. J. 
Nason, Ruth M. 

Mrs. William B. Downey 

Box 396, Fessenden, N. D. 
Sanborn, Lucy 

Mrs. Eugene A. Urbain 

% OICC Bu Docks, Contracts, APO 285, New 
York, N. Y. 

1928 
Dow, Dorothea M. 

Mrs. Theodore Taylor 

25 South Munn Ave., East Orange, N. J. 
Fitzhugh, Florence Aff. 

Mrs. Edwin J. Phelps 

R.D. 2, Westport, Conn. 
Haas, Charlotte A. Aff. 

Mrs. Linus C. Whitman 

752 Willborough Dr., Burlingame, Calif. 
Quin, Marion B. Aff. 

Mrs. Cyril M. Coggins 

124 Leinback Ave., Ft. Ord, Calif. 
Swihart, Jean R. 

Mrs. Norman E. Sherwood 

992 Durlston Rd., Redwood City, Calif. 

1929 
Francis, Polly 

Mrs. Russell T. Loesch 

38 Stephens St., Montclair, N. J. 
Jones, F. Gwenllian 

Mrs. Donald W. Hamblin 

755 Holladay Rd., Pasadena 5, Calif. 
Stewart, Katherine C. Aff. 

Mrs. Eugene D. Emigh, Jr. 

345 Monroe St., New Britain, Conn. 
Tobey, Louise 

Mrs. Sterling M. P. Dean 

225 W. Whitcomb, Glendale, Calif. 

1930 
Brewer. Elizabeth 

Mrs. Gerard H. Dericks 
2829 E. 34 St., Tulsa 5, Okla. 



Maxwell, Dora Aff. 

Mrs. Francis B. Harrison, Jr. 
2395-35th St., Los Alamos, N. M. 
Perry, Elizabeth 

Mrs. R. Lynox Lewis 

Schiller 512, Colonia Chapultepec Moralea, Mexi- 
co 5, D.F., Mexico 

1931 
Collins, Flora M. 

10651 Ashton, Los Angeles 24, Calif. 
Sawyer, Gretchen Aff. 

Mrs. Gordon D. Williams 

303 Alleghany Ave., Baltimore 4, Md. 

1932 
Frederick, Phyllis C. 

507 W. 59th St., New York 19, N. Y. 
Harvey, Frances P. 

Mrs. Frank F. Bedell 

6 Church St., West Boylston, Mass. 
Macfadden, Beverly Aff. 

Mrs. Roland Hebert 

3953 So. Flower Dr., Los Angeles 37, Calif. 
Mailey, Ruth 

1259 W. 4th, Livermore, Calif. 
Tucker, Barbara Aff. 

St. Francis in the Fields, Harrods Creek, Ky. 

1933 
Anderson, Elizabeth D. Aff. 

Mrs. Ralph P. Knapp 

36 Erie Ave., Midland Park, N. J. 
Burnham, Jane N. 

Mrs. Jerrold W. Curry 

84 Lebanon St., Southbridge, Mass. 
Chase, Margaret 

Mrs. Robert E. Johnson 

Lyons Plains Rd., R.F.D. 6, Westport, Conn. 
Chase, Rozilla 

Mrs. W. Harvey Roberts, Jr. 

25 October Lane, Weston 93, Mass. 
Fitzhugh, Emily E. Aff. 

Mrs. Emily F. Boone 

1609 31st N.W., Apt. 204, Washington 7, D. C. 
Grosvenor, Gloria V. Aff. 

Mrs. Torfinn Oftedal 

% National Geographic Soc, 1146-16th St., 
N.W., Washington, D. C. 
Houghton, Marion 

Mrs. Alfred Ronstadt 

Avenida San Buenaventura, 171, Tlalpan, Fed- 
eral District, Mexico 
Mahoney, Mary C. Aff. 

Mrs. Peyton H. Moss 

Tuxedo Park, N. Y. 

1934 
Caldwell, Alice W. Aff. 

Mrs. William N. Fenney, Jr. 

Cedar Hill Farm, R.F.D., Fishhill, N. Y. 
Coutant, Georgette Aff. 

Mrs. A. Marston Strathie 

Dalington Rd., Yardley, Penna. 
Hall, Delight D. 

Mrs. Tyge E. Rothe 

Rt. 1, Sturgis Highway, Westport, Conn. 
Marsh, Nancy P. 

Mrs. Victor A. Gares 

155 Center St., Danvers, Mass. 

1935 
Cary, Helen E. 

Mrs. Helen C. May 

960 Sherman St., Denver, Colo. 
Chappell, Edna J. Aff. 

Mrs. Lee Bartlett 

150 Dokemus Ave., Ridgewood, N. J. 
Dawes, Jane G. 

Mrs. John H. McClennan 

32 Central St., Winchester, Mass. 
Eaton, Elaine W. 

Mrs. Wesley W. Perine 

147 Avalon Dr., Rochester, N. Y. 
Look, Ernestine Aff. 

Mrs. Sheldon L. Land 

1847 Alpene Dr., San Marino, Calif. 
More, Doris K. 

Mrs. George A. Boelker 

Frog Hollow Farm, R.D. 2, Lansdale, Penna. 
Page, Virginia Aff. 

Mrs. Thomas R. Thorp 

622 Blue Ash Dr., Lexington, Ky. 



Schwartz, Doris B. 

Mrs. Allen S. Lewis 

21 Alton Court, Brookline, Mass. 
Strahl, Eliese 

Mrs. John C. Cutler 

7904 Longbranch Parkway, Takoma Park 12, 
Md. 
Taylor, Rosamond Aff. 

Mrs. Harold H. Jensen, Jr. 

29 Crescent Rd., Longmeadow, Mass. 

1936 
Eastlack. M. Mildred 

Mrs. Howard E. Gray 

1307 Lafayette Blvd., Norfolk 9, Va. 
Rappoport, Rosalie 

Mrs. Sylvan A. Saul 

94 Deerfield Ave., Danbury, Conn. 
Russell, Anne 

Mrs. Malcolm S. Loring 

26 Crest Rd., Sharon, Mass. 
Sargent, Elizabeth 

Mrs. John C. Crandell, Jr. 

40 Nichis Rd., Cohasset, Mass. 
Souther, Barbara Aff. 

Mrs. Frederick J. Cooke 

Hqs. 1st Army, Governors Island, N. Y. 
Taylor, Jane Aff. 

Mrs. Frederick Barnicoat 

612 Westminster Ave., Elizabeth, N. J. 

1937 
Brennan, Alice 

Mrs. William F. Rock 

Woodbridge Rd., North Andover, Mass. 
Burdine, Patricia 

19 Jones St., Apt. 1, New York 14, N. Y. 
Connelly, Frances 

Mrs. James R. Dowd 

15 Chestnut St., Andover, Mass. 
Cutter, Thelma 

Mrs. Harold W. Leuenberger 

714 Camellia Circle, Warner Robins, Ga. 
Forbush, Catherine 

Mrs. George H. Bass, II 

Farmington, R.F.D. 3, Maine 
Gage, Sally 

Mrs. Charles N. Curtis 

Salem Rd., Topsfield, Mass. 
Inman, Elizabeth 

Mrs. Robert F. Kirkpatrick 

107 Walnut Ave., Corte Madera, Calif. 
Knox, Constance Aff. 

142 Garth Rd., Scarsdale, N. Y. 
Peden, Edith 

Mrs. Duane C. Doherty 

Box 1604, Boynton Beach, Fla. 
Pierpont, Barbara 

Mrs. David M. Craig, Jr. 

5746 Aylesboro Ave., Pittsburgh 17, Penna. 
Richards, Priscilla 

Mrs. Richard Phenix 

425 Hartel Ave., Philadelphia 11, Penna. 
Stevenson, Louise B. 

Mrs. Henry T. Andersen 

APO 74, Box K, % Postmaster, San Francisco 
Calif. 
Wilson, Mary P. Aff. 

Mrs. Daniel P. Brown 

1035 Greenwood Ave., Wilmette, 111. 

1938 
Cross, Jean A. 

Mrs. William R. Maier 

Aquetong Rd., New Hope R.D., Bucks County 
Penna. 
King, Gloria Aff. 

Mrs. Milton D. Elkin 

Einstein College of Medicine, 1710 Newport Ave. 
New York, N. Y. 
McBride, Elizabeth 

Mrs. Jack W. Chapman 

1200 South Lee St., Lodi, Calif. 
Sawyer, Jeanne 

Mrs. John B. Faggi 

9 Linden Gardens, Wellesley, Mass. 
Simpson, Anne 

Mrs. John White 

31 Beverly Rd., Madison, N. J. 
Thayer, Virginia 

Mrs. John B. Boothby 

90 Legend Rd., San Anselmo, Calif. 



j Vogt, Jane E. 

Mrs. Arthur R. Cooke 
49 Tulip St., Summit, N. J. 
Wilson, Betty Jean Afl\ 

Mrs. Charles Galloway, Jr. 

6551 Miramar Dr., Country Club Estates, Tuc- 
son, Ariz. 

1939 
Alden, Ellen 

Mrs. By ram E. Reed 

922 Cornell, Wilmette, 111. 
Buchanan, Lucia 

Mrs. Ralph E. Livingston 

Wilson Rd., Concord, Mass. 
I Curtis, Mary Virginia 

Mrs. Maria Curtis-Verna 

Via Startaco 38, Presso Rolandi, Milano, Italy 
Goss, Patricia I. 

Mrs. James S. Rhodes 

5561 Ambleside, Seattle 5, Wash. 
Hubbard, Joan 

Mrs. Charles J. Lawson, Jr. 

20 Lenox PI., Scarsdale, N. Y. 
Martin, Eleanor 

Mrs. Robert B. Chatfield 

4875 Drake Rd., Cincinnati 27, Ohio 
Skinner, Charlotte 

Mrs. Gregory McCanna 

Box 45, Hartland Four Corners, Vt. 

1940 
Bittner, Carolyn 

Mrs. William B. Duane 

121 Lowell Rd., Wellesley Hills, Mass. 
Carlson, Joan P. 

Mrs. Lewis R. Hutchison 

4612 Grove, Skokie, 111. 
Chad-wick, Suzanne 

Mrs. Richard R. Bush 

339 Ruby St., Laguna Beach, Calif. 
Chandler, Frances 

Mrs. William D. Futch 

919 Snell Isle Blvd., St. Petersburg, Fla. 
Chase, Mary P. 

Mrs. F. Leon Foster, Jr. 

4 Lakeview Rd., Winchester, Mass. 
Cowles, Jeanne 

Mrs. Philip D. Wilson, Jr. 

26 East 81st St., New York, N. Y. 
Dalrymple, Elaine 

Mrs. E. Dalrymple Borowski 

Elm St., South Byfield, Mass. 
Littauer, M. Janet 

Mrs. Joseph M. Parriott 

Stoneboat Rd., R.D. 4, Westport, Conn. 
Poore, Buth M. 

Mrs. Elbert M. Spurr 

Rt. 1, Rees Rd., Erie, Penna. 
Spear, Ellen L. 

Mrs. William N. Kinley 

R.F.D. 1, Rumford, Me. 
Wilson, Jane A. 

Mrs. Joseph P. Day, III 

Independence Rd., Concord, Mass. 

1941 
Martin, Mary Aneve 

Mrs. Robert K. Meredith 

33 Elm St., Brookline, Mass. 
Parrot, Jane 

Mrs. Arthur K. Brown, Jr. 

53 Lloyd Rd., Montclair, N. J. 
Selden, Anne 

910 Bradley, Laramie, Wyo. 
Troub, Frances 

Mrs. Bertram H. Roberts 

Ridge View Rd., Orange, Conn. 
Tyer, Martha 

Mrs. Nelson Curtis, Jr. 

135 Gun Hill St., Milton 86, Mass. 
Woodman, Susan B. 

Mrs. Robert T. McSherry 

15 Whitney Ridge Terr., Hamden 18, Conn. 

1942 
Bolton, Ethel Ann 

Mrs. Charles Henderson, Jr. 
113 Park PI., Chapel Hill, N. C. 
Craig, Helen W. 

Mrs. Jerome T. Jarrold 

40 Stiles Dr., Huntington, L. L, N. Y. 



Kslin, llelenly 

Mrs. Richard W. Homans 

Hosmer Rd., Concord, Mass. 
Gilbert, Mary Lou 

Mrs. Burnett G. Bartley, Jr. 

Rt. 1, Box 296, Libertyville, 111. 
Gorsuch, Elizabeth 

Mrs. Daniel D. White 

648 Adair Ave., Zanesville, Ohio 
Hamilton, Diantha 

Mrs. Joseph M. McDowell 

45 Rodgers Rd., USNA, Annapolis, Md. 
Hill, Margaret 

Mrs. Harry Bell, Jr. 

1241 Chantilly Rd., Los Angeles 24, Calif. 
Lacey, Ninon 

Mrs. Bernard Chaet 

94 Prospect St., New Haven 11, Conn. 
Lytic, Elizabeth 

Mrs. John A. Rushlau 

1490 So. Filbert Way, Denver, Colo. 
McFarlin, Margaret, 1st Lt. 

7505 T.H. USAF Hospital, APO 232, N. Y. 
Ninomiya, Edith 

Mrs. A. R. Hopkins 

109 Lovell St., Worcester 3, Mass. 
Todd, Emma Ann 

Mrs. John A. Hamlet 

Sailor's Way, Rumson, N. J. 
Williams, Elsie 

Mrs. Ery W. Kehaya 

R.R. 1, Box 317A, Oenoke Ridge, New Canaan, 
Conn. 

1943 

Cooley, Janet 

Mrs. William J. Sloss 

Garden Flat, 97 Hornsey Lane, London, N. 6, 
England 
Duncan, Virginia AflF. 

220 Jerome Ave., Carle PI., N. Y. 
Lehmann, Marjorie 

Mrs. Benjamin Moats 

6450 Offutt Rd., Chevy Chase, Md. 
Loughridge, Sara Ann 

Mrs. Robert B. Konstam 

641 Braeburn St., Mansfield, Ohio 
Packard, Lucille W. AflF. 

2003 Commonwealth Ave., Brighton 35, Mass. 
Peterson, Elizabeth 

69 West Cedar St., Boston, Mass. 
Pierpont, Patricia E. AflF. 

Mrs. Richard W. Graves, Jr. 

232 North San Marino, San Gabriel, Calif. 
Shaughnessy, Katherine E. 

1976 California St., San Francisco, Calif. 
Swenning, Louise A. 

Mrs. Lancer R. Weinrich 

48 8th Ave., Clarion, Penna. 
Tapper, Marilyn 

Mrs. Clifton F. Mountain 

6019 S. Ingleside Ave., Apt. 604, Chicago, 111. 

1944 
Buland, Nan 

2145 California St., San Francisco, Calif. 
Cahill, Elinor 

302 East 38th St., New York 16, N. Y. 
Calvin, Jacquelin W. 

Mrs. Warren W. Johnson 

320 Creston, Kalamazoo, Mich. 
Corkran, Anne C. Aflf. 

Mrs. Clairborne R. McGee, Jr. 

3013 28th St., Lubbock, Texas 
Emerson, Nancy 

Mrs. Sheldon T. Viele 

43 Clarendon PI., Buffalo 9, N. Y. 
Leland, Charlotte 

Town House Apts., S.E. East 2nd Ave., Ft. 
Lauderdale, Fla. 
Lyons, Buth S. 

57 Gleason Rd., Lexington, Mass. 
Mastrangelo, Theresa 

Mrs. William A. Mahoney, Jr. 

121. Governor St., Providence 6, R. I. 
Mclvor, Nancy L. 

Mrs. Dwight W. Webb 

330 South Compo Rd., Westport, Conn. 
McMurray, Emily P. 

Mrs. Edgar T. Mead, Jr. 

114 East 90th St., New York 28, N. Y. 



5 



Pendleton, Katherine W. 

Mrs. George W. Phelan 

545 East 14th St., Apt. 5 G. New York 9. X. Y. 
Reid, Elizabeth 

Mrs. Jesse M. Buzby, Jr. 

23 Lynn Rd., Port Washington. L. I.. X. Y. 
Rich, Elizabeth 

Mrs. James L. Ferguson 

2993 Springer Ave., Cincinnati 8, Ohio 
Travis, Margaret 

Mrs. William I. Atwood 

31 Belcrest Rd., West Hartford 7, Conn. 
Trow, Charlotte B. 

Mrs. Earl A. Young 

484 Cold Spring Ave., W. Springfield, Mass. 
Woodams, Shirley 

Mrs. Howard Hoesterey 

1131 La Flora Lane, Glendora, Calif. 

1945 
Beecher, Barbara 

155 Beacon St., San Francisco 12, Calif. 
Boynton, Martha 

Mrs. Robert H. Pawle 

1126 S. Gaylord St., Denver, Colo. 
Dodge, Nancy 

Mrs. Frank R. Glazebrooks 

6620 Willston PI., Falls Church, Va. 
Dorsel, Ann C. 

Mrs. James Monroe, Jr. 

3608 Mound Way, Cincinnati 27, Ohio 
Ferns, Nancy Aff. 

Mrs. Harold B. Simpson, Jr. 

22 Thomasina Lane, Noroton, Conn. 
Hardon, Phyllis 

Mrs. James T. Gander 

141 W. Zeunert Blvd., Apt. B, Cedarburg, Wis. 
Holdsworth, Joan 

Mrs. James W. Arrott, Jr. 

3413 36th St., Lubbock, Texas 
Kurth, Mary Jane 

Mrs. Edward E. Longabaugh 

240 Noridge Dr., Rochester, N. Y. 
Leavitt, Sally D. 

Mrs. Edward R. Cheney 

American Embassy, The Hague, Netherlands 
Luce, Andree 

Mrs. Jack Cooney 

160 Columbia Heights, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Marsh, Marion 

Mrs. James G. Birney 

St. Luke's Rectory, Seaford, Del. 
Mitchell, Janet 

Mrs. Burnell Poole, Jr. 

8 Woodcrest Rd., South Portland, Me. 
Redman, Janet 

Mrs. Samuel R. Hill, Jr. 

3337 Briarcliff Rd., Birmingham 9, Ala. 
Spear, Sally 

Mrs. Anthony T. E. Elmendorf 

12 Knox St., Rumford. Me. 
Stegner, Mary Lou 

Mrs. Emil Eugene Ebner, 3rd 

350 Race St., Berea, Ohio 
Twomey, Madge M. 

Mrs. George R. Keepin, Jr. 

2521-B 36th St., Los Alamos, N. M. 
Van Cleve, Beatrice 

Mrs. John K. Lee 

198 Linden Lane, Princeton, N. J. 
Welles, Charlotte 

Mrs. Frederic W. Locke 

43 Howells Rd., Belmont, Mass. 
Whiffen, M. Lois Aff. 

Mrs. Blackwell Dunnam 

1421 Covent Rd., Troy, Ohio 

1946 

Allen, Sarah 

Mrs. Samuel G. Waugh 

494 Redding Rd., Fairfield, Conn. 
Biddle, Barbara 

100 Orchard Ave., Weston 93, Mass. 
Burns, Nancy 

Mrs. C. Dean Brelis 

Cornwall, Conn. 
Brumback. M. Ellen 

1572 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, Mass. 
Clayton. Noma S. 

Mrs. Weston Flint 

2 North Park St., Hanover, N. H. 



Copeland, Jenny B. 

Mrs. Donald J. Dufford 

420 Orchard Ave., Grand Junction, Colo. 
Fisher, Anne Aff. 

Mrs. Andrew L. Riker, 1 1 1 

% H. D. Bowman, Jr.. 3115 NecColl St.. Sai 
Diego, Calif. 
Gorham, Frances B. 

Mrs. Theodore Postma, Jr. 

Sugar Hill Rd.. Hopkinton, X. H. 
Greene, Muriel 

Mrs. Peter H. Balmer 

District Office. Shagamli Xigeria, BAY. A. 
Hellweg, Ann D. (Nancy) 

Mrs. John C. Warren 

Dunbar Hall. Exeter, X. H. 
Howe, Mary Louise 

Mrs. Charles T. Brumback 

2415 Orchard Rd., Toledo 6, Ohio 
Malott, Janet Aff. 

Mrs. Jared Elliot 

1947 Ivy Lane, Palo Alto, Calif. 
Ross, Elizabeth 

Mrs. Sam Griggs 

Thetford, Vt. 
Teeson, Carolyn M. 

Mrs. Ross S. Keller 

3648 Lake Shore Dr., Chicago, 111. 
Troub, Marian Louise 

Mrs. Myron Friedman 

19 Barton St., West Hartford, Conn. 

1947 
Brumback, Nancy 

Mrs. Mark M. Kruvand 

5010 Carew, Bellaire, Texas 
Chandler, M. Anne 

Mrs. Theodore Anthonv 

19 Valley Rd., Drexel Hill, Pa. 
Olivers, Lucy Dee 

Mrs. Ezra L. Bixbv 

Amwell Rd., R.F.D. 1, Hopewell. X. J. 
Cole, Janice H. 

67 Storrs Ave., Braintree, Mass. 
Dignan, Hester 

Ledge Rd., East Gloucester, Mass. 
Dowd, Helen E. 

Mrs. Gilbert B. Richards 

2735 Coleraine Ave., Cincinnati 25, Ohio 
Flather, Edith 

681 S. Marengo Ave., Apt. 5, Pasadena, Calif. 
Flowers, Ann Aff. 

Mrs. Philip G. Howlett 

1505 South Greenwood, Park Ridge. 111. 
French, Barbara J. 

Mrs. Roger Brandt 

333 Simsbury Rd., Bloomfield, Conn. 
Kinneman, Donna C. 

Mrs. Thomas J. Hasley 

1512 Williamsburg PL, Pittsburgh 35, Penna. 
Long, Helen P. Aff. 

427 Spring Ave., Ridgewood, X T . J. 
Mitchell, Elizabeth A. 

110 E. 36th St., New York. X. Y. 
Obering, Priscilla Alden 

Mrs. Paul F. O'Brien, Jr. 

Box 1152, Shreveport. La. 
Bobbins, Susanne 

Mrs. Bradford C. deWolf 

Box 135, Rt. 1, Vienna, Ya. 
Rodgers, Patricia J. Aff. 

340 West 85th St., New York 24. X. Y. 
Turner. Barbara K. 

Mrs. George S. Ives 

3632 Valley Dr., Alexandria, Va. 
Treadway, Geraldine 

Mrs. William E. Dampier 

Old Xorwalk Rd., New Canaan, Conn. 

1948 

Barber, L. Martha 

Mrs. Preston B. Lowrance, Jr. 
R.F.D. 1, Earlysville, Va. 
Barnard. Patricia 

Mrs. Richard W. Lally 

78 Main St.. Andover, Mass. 

Booth, Dorothy Lee 

Mrs. George 6. Witwer 

176 Main St.. Southington. Conn. 



I 



Connablc, INancj M. \ff. 

708 \V. South St., Kalamazoo, Mich. 
Dake, Barbara 

Mrs. C. Clark Johnson 

126 Watchung Ave., Chatham, N. J. 
Dignan, Elizabeth 

Ledge Rd., East Gloucester, Mass. 
Ilignan, Ellen 

Ledge Rd., East Gloucester, Mass, 
Dultois, Estelle 

Mis. Bernard J. Hoy, Jr. 

1024 Mt. Holyoke PL, Swarthmore, Penna. 
Kngla ml. Carolyn June 

Mrs. Charles H. Wansker, Jr. 

44 Winford Way, Winchester, Mass. 
Erdmami, Jtidiili A. 

% Ferguson, Haas Rd., Millington, N. J. 
Karrar, Mary Elizabeth 

2020 G St., N.W.. Washington 6, D. C. 
Frank, A. Fairfield 

Mrs. Arthur L. DuBois 

70 Rockledge Rd., Bronxvillc, N. Y. 
Grimshaw, Martha 

Mrs. Arthur C. Bivens 

107 Thirty-first St., Altoona, Penna. 
Hammond, Patricia 

Mrs. Robert N. Duffy 

1002 O'Brien Ave., Schenectady 3, N. Y. 
Hughes, Sarah J. 

Mrs. Richard S. Carr, Jr. 

Rosebrook Rd., New Canaan, Conn. 
Lackey, Mary 

Mrs. Samuel C. Stowell 

1368 Park Lane, Pelham Manor, N. Y. 
I .mi i . Sarah B. 

Labor-in-Vain Rd., Ipswich, Mass. 
Rich, Mary Annis 

141 East 88 St., Apt. 9-A, New York, N. Y. 
Richmond, Hannah 

220 Madison Ave., New York 16, N. Y. 
Russell, Tatiana 

Mrs. John D. Potter 

11904 Cromwell Ave., Cleveland 20, Ohio 
Sinclaire, Mary Carroll 

Mrs. James R. Morris, IV 

Rt. 2, 5600 S. University Blvd., Littleton, Colo. 
Tasche, Helen D. 

Mrs. C. J. North, Jr. 

98 Chestnut St., Boston, Mass. 
Taylor, Helen 

Mrs. Frank P. Dodd 

17 Benedict St., Middletown, N. J. 
Vosse, Deborah Jane 

Mrs. Frank A. Howard 

I Mt. Ida Terr., Newton 58, Mass. 
Wallis, Eleanor 

144 W. 11th St., New York 11, N. Y. 

1949 
Asirvatham, Premi 

Mrs. John Eills 

II North Russell St., Boston, Mass. 
Banks, Honor L. 

Mrs. Malcolm O. MacLean 

187 Ocean Ave., Massapequa, L. L, N. Y. 
Barnes, Mercy 

Wave Barracks, 1, U.S.N.T.C, San Diego, Calif. 
Bronaugh, Ann L, 

1680 York Ave., New York 28, N. Y. 
Brown, Fredericka 

Mrs. Robert L. Bettinger 

305 West Towne, Glendive, Mont. 
Cowles, Nancy C. Aff. 

Mrs. William H. Black 

2325 S St., Washington, D. C. 
Gibbons, Darlene 

6502 Lake Shore Dr., Dallas 14, Texas 
Gibbs, Sally Jane 

229 W. 78th St., New York, N. Y. 
Hamby, Barbara C. 

Mrs. James P. McLane 

199 West Shore Rd., Great Neck, L. I., N. Y. 
Maddux, Polly AflF. 

Mrs. David Harlow 

9 Newlin Rd., Princeton, N. J. 
Nesbitt, Katherine A. 

Mrs. Fred D. Reese, Jr. 

% F. T. Nesbitt, 2139 Evergreen Rd., Toledo 6, 
Ohio 
Parks, Joanna M. 

311 St. Ronan St., New Haven, Conn. 



Pendleton, Mary Lois 

(> Bennett St., Cambridge, Ma 
(}\i\n(i, ( larole V . 

( >.<1 Madison Ave.. New York, X. Y. 
Rogal, Nancs S. 
Mrs. Albert ( lohen 

29 Cotton St., Newton, Mass. 
Williams. Deborah D. 

Mrs. R. Wallace Troeiiinei, Jr. 

14 Tecumseh Rd., Strathmere, X. J. 

1950 

Aldrich, Joan 

698 A Farmington Ave.. West Hartford, Conn. 
Atwood, Cynthia AIT. 

Mrs. Norman Couch 

803H W. Washington Ave., S. Bend. Ind. 
Barry, Patricia 

Mrs. Harold G. Burbank, Jr. 

South Lansing, N. Y. 
Bradley, Elizabeth 

Mrs. Charles J. Hubbard 

307 B, Holden Green, Cambridge, Mass. 
Burke, Patricia 

Mrs. John M. Wright 

214 Court St., Keene, N. H. 
Corey, Constance 

Mrs. John M. Lashbrook 

Rt. 2, Box 266, Williamsburg, Va. 
Davis, Georgette 

Mrs. Giovanni Ferrante 

% P.M. Davis, Woodside Dr., Greenwich, Conn. 
Dignan, Marion Aff. 

Ledge Rd., East Gloucester, Mass. 
Doane, Margaret 

Mrs. Richard W. Calvert 

326 Park Dr., San Antonio, Texas 
Flather, Beverley F. 

Mrs. Charles G. Edwards 

235 B Ave., NHA 1, Honolulu 18, T. H. 
Gafill, Jane R. 

Mrs. Reginald F. Towner, Jr. 

1412 Highland Blvd., Hayward, Calif. 
Gibbon, Roberta A. 

Mrs. Neligh Coates, Jr. 

1308 North Shore Dr., R.R. 4, Lees Summit, Mo. 
Greenwald, Mary Jane 

Mrs. Peter Jakobson 

11 Waverly PL, New York, N. Y. 
Griffin, Joyce 

Mrs. Richard B. Kurz 

119 Nevada St., Victorville, Calif. 
Huberth, Coralie 

Mrs. Samuel Sloan 

125 West 12th St., New York, N. Y. 
Johnson, Nora 

Mrs. Leonard Siwek 

% Ar. Am. Co., Dhahran, Saudi, Arabia 
Kimberly, Caroline M. 

336 Harvard St., Cambridge, Mass. 
Kitchell, Margaretta 

Mrs. W. Laird Stabler, Jr. 

916 Stuart Rd., Wilmington, Del. 
Lange, Judith M. 

Mrs. Frank R. Fogertey, Jr. 

902 Edna Ave., Kirkwood 22, Mo. 
Lester, Mary Lou 

Mrs. Homer B. Clark, Jr. 

Rt. 1, Box 159, Winters, Calif. 
Lindamood, Ann 

Mrs. Robert H. Twyford 

829 Lamberth Blvd., Jackson, Tenn. 
Moser, Ann K. 

832 Kipling, Apt. 2, Palo Alto, Calif. 
Stevens, Sarah Marian 

Mrs. W. Duncan MacMillan, II 

28 Lansdowne Gardens, Pointe Clair, Quebec 
Thompson, Eleanor Aff. 

Mrs. E. Arthur Tutein, III 

Thrall Rd., R.F.D. 1, Rockville, Conn. 
Westhaver, Sally 

Mrs. Richard B. Kydd 

27 Garden St., Boston, Mass. 
Yoffa, Gloria H. 

Mrs. Nelson Portnov 

429 Clinton St., New Bedford, Mass. 

1951 
Barrington, Gwendolyn L. 

Cornell Medical School, 1300 York Ave., New 
York 21, N. Y. 



Dower, Sally Ann 

Mrs. Jack W. Saglio 

186 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 
Eccles, Lydia 

Mrs. John M. Page 
^ 2722 73rd St., Kent Village, Hyattsville, Md. 
Emmons, Abbie 

Mrs. Donald W. Penfield 

% Emmons, 20 Westbourne Rd., Concord, N. H. 
Fuller, Rebecca Aff. 

Mrs. Theodore D. Sheldon 

10558 Lindbrook Dr., Los Angeles 24, Calif. 
Grieco, Edna Marie 

Mrs. Thomas J. Thomas 

526 D, Croyden Ave., San Antonio, Texas 
Habsburg, Maria Ileana 

215 East 59th St., New York, N. Y. 
Hall, Constance 

Mrs. Benneville N. Strohecker 

Brookline Manor Apts., Reading, Penna. 
Lane, M. Frances 

% Dept. of Biochemistry, Univ. of Calif., Berke- 
ley 4, Calif. 
Marble, June 

Mrs. Anthony L. Vydra 

8311 Garland Ave., Apt. 5, Takoma Pk., Md. 
Mason, Sarah Jane 

Mrs. Howard G. Crowell, Jr. 

Apt. 838-C, Upatoi Terr., Columbus, Ga. 
McConnel, Harriette 

Sedgwick Junior High School, 128 Sedgwick Rd., 
West Hartford 7, Conn. 
Morrison, Joan E. 

220 Fisher Ave., Boston 20, Mass. 
Reifsnyder, Rosamond 

Mrs. James K. Peck, Jr. 

1801 North Lake Ave., Bayside, Va. 
Russell, Frances 

Mrs. George L. Phelps 

Sunset Farm, West Hartford, Conn. 
Smith, Patricia 

Mrs. George D. Langdon, Jr. 

1707 Cherry Ave., Lawton, Okla. 
Teasdale, Merilyn 

Mrs. Charles L. Abbott 

R.F.D. 2, Buzzard's Bay, Mass. 
Wallace, Sylvie Ann 

Barlogan, Priory Dr., Stanmore, Middlesex, 
England 
Webster, Audrey Aff. 

Mrs. George J. Prevo 

360 West 21st St., New York 11, N. Y. 
Wheeler, Mary Macy 

Mrs. Gardner D. Shepard 

24 Arnold Rd., Wellesley Hills, Mass. 



Whittall, Margaret 

Thrushwood, Washington, Conn. 
Wood, Barbara 

Mrs. Deighton K. Emmons 
51 Elm St., Marblehead, Mass. 

1952 

Church, Barbara 

Mrs. Albert L. Sheffer 

3971 Langley Court, N.W., Apt. C 597, Washini 
ton, D. C. 
Edwards, Jane 

Mrs. Eugene E. Holbrook 

621 N.E. 13th St., Homestead, Fla. 
Griffiths, Elizabeth 

Mrs. Frederic McCurdy 

275 Manhattan Ave., Crestwood, N. Y. 
Johnson, Roberta G. Aflf. 

36 Banks St., Waltham 54, Mass. 
Lyons, Ann Leighton 

123 W. 13th St., New York, N. Y. 
Neisser, Helen 

Mrs. Fernando Modenesi 

1730 Isabella, Evanston, 111. 
Willman, Emma F. 

13 Small St., North Quincy, Mass. 

1953 
Gardner, Ruth E. AflF. 

Mrs. John H. Crider, Jr. 

% Mrs. Gardner, Box 666, Nantucket Islan 
Mass. 
Van Dusen, Harriet Aff. 

Mrs. Horton S. Spitzer 

Greenfield Hill, Fairfield, Conn. 
Zuill, Ann Margaret 

17 Culford Mansions, Culford Gardens, Londo 
S.W. 3, England 

1956 
Albert, Leane Aff. 

Candlewood Shores, Brookfield, Conn. 
Hawkins, Mary S. Aff. 

18 Kraft Ave., Bronxville 8, N. Y. 



PAST FACULTY 

Elroy, Gwendolyn 

Mrs. Douglas Walsh 
1769 Hamlet St., San Mateo, Calif. 
Pickering, Roberta 

Mrs. Frank A. Montgomery 

2466 Andros Ave., Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 



8 



lilllililin^jP 




\bbot Academy Bulletin 

October, 1955 



ABBOT ACADEMY BULLETIN 



Series 23 



OCTOBER, 1955 



Issue i 



Abbot Academy Alumnae Association 

Associate Member of the American Alumni Council 



President 
Miss Irene At wood 

180 Commonwealth Ave. 
Boston 16, Mass. 

Vice-Presidents 

Mrs. Edmund W. Nutting 
(Mary Howard) 
2 1 Wave Ave. 
Wakefield, Mass. 

Miss Dorothy Taylor 
118 Elgin Street 
Newton Centre 59, Mass. 

Mrs. A. Lawrence Van Wart 
(Betty Weaver) 
160 Melrose Place 
Ridgewood, N. J. 



OFFI CERS— 1 954- 1 956 

Clerk 
Mrs. Robert C. Holland 
(Barbara Healey) 
211 Chestnut Street 
Andover, Mass. 

Treasurer 
Mrs. Lawrence D. BraggJr. 
(Mary Dooley) 
Alden Road 
Andover, Mass. 

General Secretary 
Miss C. Jane Sullivan 
97 Knox Street 
Lawrence, Mass. 



Alumnae Trustees 
1951-1957 
Mrs. H. Guyford Stever 
(Louise Risley) 
16 Edgehill Dr., BelleHaven 
Alexandria, Va. 

1954-1960 
Mrs. Herbert P. Carter 
(Pauline Humeston) 
163 Glenwood Road 
Englewood, N. J. 



ABBOT CLUB PRESIDENTS 



BOSTON 

Mrs. John L. Simonds 
(Mary Trafton) 
3 Kennedy Road 
Cambridge 38, Mass. 



CHICAGO 

Mrs. Floyd Shumway 
(Margaret Rabling) 
815 East Deerpath 
Lake Forest, Illinois 



DETROIT 
Mrs. Howard H. Fitzgerald 
(Jean Craig) 
19091 Bedford Road 
Birmingham, Mich. 



MAINE, EASTERN 

Mrs. John White 
(Margaret O'Leary) 
3 Wilson Park 
Waterville, Maine 



NEW YORK 

President 
Mrs. Lucien R. Tharaud 
(Cynthia James) 
17 East 96th Street 
New York 28, N. Y. 

OHIO, CENTRAL 
Mrs. John B. Gager 
(Thelma Mazey) 
228 N. Drexel Avenue 
Columbus 9, Ohio 



CONNECTICUT 
Mrs. Donald Hoggson 
(Gertrude Drummond) 
R.F.D. 
Lakeville, Conn. 



MAINE, WESTERN 
Mrs. Frank N. Wells 
(Louise Houghton) 
32 Ship Channel Road 
South Portland, Maine 



OLD COLONY 

Mrs. James T. Cottrell 
(A. Louise Thompson) 
372 Madison Street 
Fall River, Mass. 



THE EDITORIAL BOARD 

Jane B. Carpenter, 1892, honorary 
Constance Parker Chipman, 1906, honorary 
C.Jane Sullivan, 1931, Editor-in-Chief 
Irene Atwood, 1918,6V officio 



Published four times yearly, October, February, May, and September, by Abbot Acad 
emy, Andover, Massachusetts. 

Entered as second class matter December 1 2, 1 933, at the post office at Andover, Mass 
achusetts, under the act of August 24, 191 2. 



Fall Calendar — 1955 



September 20 Arrival and registration of new resident students 
September 21 Arrival and registration of old resident students 
September 22 First Chapel 

Regular classes begin 
September 24 School picnic at Ipswich Beach 

Old girl-new girl party in the evening 
September 25 Vespers — Mrs. Crane 
October 1 Senior picnic 

Puppet Theatre of Stuttgart — The Swabian Puppets 
October 2 Vespers — The Reverend A. Graham Baldwin, D.D., Chap- 
lain, Phillips Academy 
October 8 Illustrated lecture by Mrs. Julian Rogers, Executive Secre- 
tary of "Friends of Albert Schweitzer" 
October g Vespers — The Reverend Alexander St.-Ivanyi, D.D., First 

Church of Christ, Lancaster 
October 75 Mary Seiler — "The Harp, Ancient and Modern" — Lecture- 
Recital 
October 16 The Reverend Herbert A. Jerauld, Reading, Massachusetts 
October 20 "The Trembling Earth" — Illustrated Lecture by Joe Ramsey 
October 23 The Reverend Harold King, The First Church of Christ, 

Farmington, Conn. 
October 30 Vespers — The Reverend Lewis H. Davis, Superintendent of 
the New York East Conference of the Methodist Church, 
Stamford, Conn. 
November 6 Northfield Vespers 
November 13 Vespers — The Reverend George E. Beilby, Jr., Phillips Exeter 

Academy 
November ig Senior-Mid Talent Show 
November 20 Student Recital 
November 23 Thanksgiving Service 
November 26 Recital by Miss Friskin 

November 27 Vespers — The Reverend Hans Sidon, Ph.D. 
December 3 Senior Play 
December 4 A.C.A. Christmas Vespers 
December g Prep Christmas Play — St. George 
December 10 Reading by Miss Hale 
December 11 Christmas Service — Mrs. Crane 
December 14 Christmas Dinner and Carol Singing 
December 75 School closes for Christmas Vacation 



THE GEORGE EZRA ABBOT GYMNASIUM 




. . in August 




. . . in October 



QteetuiXjA* 




Mrs. Crane with her daughters Bethia, Alex- 
andra, Julianna, and Lucy. 



Many people have spoken 
or written to me during the last 
months to tell me what I al- 
ready knew — that Abbot 
Academy is a school of excel- 
lence. Many also added that 
much of its strength lies in the 
devotion and friendship of its 
Alumnae. 

Your tangible contribu- 
tion to the growth of Abbot is 
impressive indeed; over the 
years you have helped create 
the buildings that shelter its 
spirit; the needs you have 
found you have worked to fill. Of equal importance is the reputation you 
have helped to build in the colleges, and professions, and in countless com- 
munities. Your training, I believe, has stood both you and Abbot in good 
stead. I have already been impressed by your loyal concern that other girls 
and their parents should know of Abbot and that Abbot should know of 
them. The fact that almost all of our applications come from parents who 
have "heard such good things of Abbot" makes it clear that our Alumnae 
are our best public relations ! 

Finally, the obvious pleasure that many of you take in coming back to 
visit the school, and the interest shown in you by all the faculty, are heart- 
warming evidences of the quality of the Abbot Alumnae. For all of these 
positive contributions I am deeply grateful. 

You will want to know, I am sure, how the school looks in the autumn 
of 1955. It looks wonderful! Two hundred-and-six students grace the campus 
and the classrooms. The teachers all appear to be glad to be back, and all 
have been incredibly helpful and understanding toward my first efforts as 
Principal. Miss Hearsey is very greatly missed by everyone at Abbot, and 
we are happy for her that she is so pleasantly established at Wellesley with 
new fields opening up for her exploration and delight. 

The look of the school is transformed by the risen walls of the George E. 
Abbot Gymnasium. They are still partly hidden by our trees, but it is a joy 
to approach the building to see how the gentle color of the brick reflects the 
side of Abbot Hall; to see the clean simplicity of the lines of wall and window. 
It is even more exciting to mount the stairs and stand in the huge gym itself. 
The lift of the arching wooden beams is beautiful. 

It fascinates me to see how a construction so "contemporary" can, 
without any sense of archaizing, carry the spirit of earlier architecture when 



the tree was the inspiration and material of sheltering mankind. And the 
gym, too, is in large part a special monument to Alumnae loyalty. 

Sunset Lodge is a faculty house now, and my four daughters and I are 
living very spaciously and happily across Abbot Street opposite the new j 
wing of Draper. Please remember that you are always welcome there, as 
you are anywhere at school. I hope that I shall meet many of you before long. 



Ouvu HmcE-TScj Irian 



s_ 



Faculty Facts 

Changes. We regret to report that several faculty members are not 
returning this year. Miss Eleanor Jennings, teacher of History, was married 
to Mr. James A. Myatt August 20, in Williamsburg, Virginia. Miss Violet 
Edmonds, who taught English, has returned to her school in Wimbledon, 
England. Miss Elizabeth Pratt is teaching History at the Mary Institute in 
St. Louis, Missouri. Mrs. Edmund Osborne is assistant to the principal at the 
Ethical Culture School in New York. Mrs. Lola Monbleau, teacher of Sing- 
ing, has moved to Harwich, Massachusetts, where her husband has a new 
church. Miss Lucette Bowers is organizing the Department of Modern 
Dance at Centenary Junior College. 

We are happy to welcome back a former faculty friend. Miss Anna 
Roth will be with us again to teach History. 

In addition, there are several new faculty members: 

Mrs. Louise Stockly, who received her A.B. degree at Vassar, will be 
one of the teachers of English. Mrs. Stockly has studied at the University of 
Bordeaux and at the Sorbonne, and taught last at the Gill School in Bar- 
nardsville, New Jersey. She has recently done graduate work in English at 
Columbia. 

The second new member of this department is Miss Jane Baker, who 
comes to Abbot from Brewster Academy in Wolfeboro, New Hampshire. 
Miss Baker was educated at Middlebury College, where she received her 
A.B. degree. She did graduate work at Boston University and spent six 
months in Europe before joining the faculty of Brewster Academy. 

History will also be taught by Mrs. Jirina Sztacho, who is Czech by 
birth. Mrs. Sztacho, who received her Ph.D. degree at the University of 
Prague, taught History, French, German and Philosophy before coming to 
this country. She is an expert historical bibliographer, who was in charge of 
the publication of the International Bibliography of Historical Sciences 



which was published with the assistance of Unesco in Paris. She was also 
associated with Radio Free Europe. 

Mr. Donald Outerbridge, who is also teaching at Phillips Academy, 
will teach History of Art and will be Curator of the John Esther Art Gallery. 
Mr. Outerbridge graduated from Phillips Academy, received his A.B. from 
Harvard and is well known for his paintings and mobiles. 

There are two new members of the Physical Education Department, 
Mrs. Jorgen Sinding Jensen and Mrs. Oswald Nagler. Mrs. Jensen, who was 
born in Bombay, India, was educated in England and Denmark. Her 
Danish husband is working on his Ph.D. degree at Harvard. Mrs. Nagler 
will be in charge of Modern Dance. She is a graduate of the Women's 
College of the University of North Carolina in Greensboro and studied with 
Mara in New York. Mrs. Nagler's husband is studying Architecture at the 
Harvard School of Design. 

Miss Gertrude Ehrhart, president of the Boston Chapter of the National 
Association of Teachers of Singing, will join the Music Department as teacher 
of Voice. Among her appearances have been those with the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra and the Handel and Haydn Society. 

Mrs. Dorothea Flint will assist in the Administrative Offices and will 
be in charge of the Information desk. She is the mother of Frances Flint '42. 
Mrs. Flint is well accustomed to being associated with young people, having 
lived for years at St. Paul's school, where her husband was a member of the 
faculty. 

Dr. Charles L. Hollis of Andover has been appointed school physician. 

Summer Activities. Many faculty members journeyed abroad. 
Mile. Arosa motored through France and Switzerland with three students. 
Two of them were Abbot girls, Louise Day '56 and Louise Bell '55. She also 
took courses at the Sorbonne. 

Miss Ayer, Miss Coffin, Miss Coolidge, Miss Ornstein, Miss Roth and 
Miss Sweeney traveled in England, Ireland, Scotland, and on the continent. 

Miss Johnson went to the Virgin Islands, and studied at Bread Loaf, 
Vermont. Miss Cassidy studied at Boston University. 

Miss Judd and Miss Tucker were counsellors at Blazing Trail Camp 
in Denmark, Maine. This camp is owned by Eugenia Parker, Abbot '16. 

Dr. Sidon spent some time in a small village in the jungles of Yucatan 
visiting some of the ancient ruins of the Mayas. He also had a pleasant so- 
journ in Mexico City and the surrounding country. 

Miss Tingley was a co-director of the Workshop for Voice Teachers of 
the National Association of Teachers of Singing held at Salisbury, Mass., in 
August. The Workshop was attended by teachers from all over the United 
States. Miss Ehrhart, a new member of the music faculty, conducted a session 
on comparative languages in tone production. 






New Alumnae Relatives 

Anne Bossi — niece of Gwendolen Bossi Hanson, 1919 

Cecily Dickson — sister of Jill Dickson, 1950 

Joyce Finger — daughter of Martha Wind Finger, 1933; niece of Gertrude Wind Scheft, 

1940 and Rose Wind Stone, 1942 
Susan Fournier — sister of Jolyne Fournier, 1955 
Betsy Gardner — sister of Lyn Gardner, 1955 
Patricia Agnes Grant — niece of Agnes Campbell Grant, 1916 
Prtscilla Grant — sister of Mary P. Grant, 1953; cousin of Delight Hall Rothe, 1934; 

grandniece of Delight Hall Gage, 1901; great-grandniece of Olive Twichell Crawford, 

1876 and Julia E. Twichell, 1879 
Ruth Gray — daughter of Dorothy French Gray, 1927; niece of Olive French Sherman, 1933; 

cousin of Ann Sherman, Aff. 1954 
Carol Greene — cousin of Louise Day, 1956 

Cornelia Jones — great-granddaughter of Rachel Thayer Jones, Aff. 1 847 
Karen Jones — sister of Linda Jones, 1954 
Sally Ann Lawrence — sister of Alice Lawrence, 1955 
Josephine Marvel — relative of Natalie Jova Odell, 1925 
Elizabeth McGuire — daughter of Helen Connolly McGuire, 1927; sister of Susan McGuire, 

1955; niece of Ruth Connolly Burke, 1925 
Susan Sheldon Moore — sister of Margaret Moore, 1954 
Diana Pierce — granddaughter of Antoinette Bancroft Pierce, Aff. 1883 
Barbara Quimby — niece of Jeanette Qiiimby Daley, 1930 
Jane Simpson — daughter of Phyllis Saunders Simpson, 1938; niece of Marian Saunders Chees- 

borough, 1922 
Laurie Lee Smith — sister of Deborah Smith, 1957 
Elsie Taylor — cousin of Eleonore Taylor Ross, 1919, Dorothy Taylor Booth, 1923, 

and Lee Booth Witwer, 1948 
Sandra Wiles — daughter of Helen Rice Wiles, 1933; granddaughter of Helen Ellis Rice, 

1906; niece of Virginia Rice Dunn, Aff. 1938 
Cynthia Worcester — daughter of Elizabeth MacPherran Worcester, 1922; niece of Sarah 

MacPherran Hartley, 1925; cousin of Caroline Wilkinson Halliday, 1920 



NEW ALUMNAE RELATIVES PICTURED ON COVER 

Left to right — Priscilla Grant, Patricia Grant, Joyce Finger, Josephine Marvel, Cynthia 
Worcester, Betsy Gardner, Anne Bossi, Jane Simpson, Susan Fournier, Laurie Smith, Cornelia 
Jones, Barbara Quimby, Elsie Taylor, Diana Pierce, Elizabeth McGuire, Cecily Dickson, 
Karen Jones, Sandra Wiles, Carol Greene, Ruth Gray, Susan Moore. Sally Ann Lawrence 
was absent. 



Miss Hearsey is making her home at Wellesley College with Miss 
Ella Keats Whiting, Dean of Wellesley. She will continue to be active 
in several fields of education, and during the second semester she will 
conduct a senior course in the Education Department at Wellesley on 
the Teaching of English in Secondary Schools. 

Her address is Oakwoods, Wellesley 8i, Mass. 



Report of Graduates of 1955 



FOUR-YEAR COLLEGES 



Allegheny 


Susan Davis 


Radcliffe 


Louise Bell 


Bennington 


Mary Earhart 




Ann Clark 


Bryn Mawr 


Eleanor Easton 




Gretchen Jordan 


Colorado 


Lyn Gardner 




Katherine Lloyd 


Connecticut 


Helen Angevine 




Natalie Smissaert 




Mary Burrowes 


Sarah Lawrence 


Sheryl Wormley 




Pamela Carpenter 


Simmons 


Susan Appleton 




Dorothy Fleming 


Skidmore 


Alice Lawrence 




Diane Sorota 


Smith 


Cynthia Knox 


Cornell 


Mary Ann Holden 




Susan McGuire 




Sara Watrous 




Mary Minard 


Hollins 


Elizabeth Baldwin 




Carroll Smith 




Anne English 




Mary Ann Yudicky 




Sally Graf 


University of Rochester 


Jeanne Skillin 


Jackson 


Jolyne Fournier 


Vassar 


Karen Olson 


Lake Erie 


Susan Blake 


Wellesley 


Starr Best 


Mount Holyoke 


Nancy Eastham 




Martha Clark 


Northwestern 


Elisabeth Oppmann 




Deborah Green 


Oberlin Conservatory 


Mary Monroe 




Margaret Holbrook 


of Music 






Juliana Morelh 


Ohio Wesleyan 


Dolores Duryee 




Louise Stephenson 


Pembroke 


Judith Carpenter 


Wheaton 


Beth Chandler 
Ann Kittredge 




TWO-YEAR 


COLLEGES 




Bradford 


Elizabeth Beal 


Briarcliff 


Gail Baldwin 




Marcia Cooper 




Betsy Elliott 




Lorraine Gibbs 


Colby 


Jean Donovan 




Katherine Stirling 


Pine Manor 


Joan Lamprey 



Berkeley School of 

Stenography 
Katharine Gibbs 



SCHOOLS OF SPECIALIZED TRAINING 

Carol Straton Lesley Ann Cleveland 

Nancy Johnson 
Marlena Comas Wheelock Jane Kent 



The gift of the class of 1955 was $700 for the Gymnasium and 
for Scholarships. 



October, 1955] 

Dear Alumnae: 

Ground was broken for the new Gymnasium on May 7, 1955. Today 
the four walls are up, the roof is on and work is in progress on the interior. 
It is hoped that the building will be completed by Thanksgiving. 

The best estimate of the cost including furnishings which I can make 
at the present time is $2 1 3,500. 

Toward the cost, nearly 1,000 devoted alumnae have contributed and : 
pledged almost $32,000. I express once again on behalf of the trustees our 
truly great thanks. This sum in addition to other gifts totaling $187,000 
brings the total amount contributed and pledged to $219,000, still some 
$81,000 short of our goal of $300,000. 

We need this further sum. The Gymnasium must be heated and lighted. 
It must be kept clean, and in good repair. The trustees are reluctant to place 
the burden of this added annual expense upon the general income of the] 
school. We want and plan to increase faculty salaries and scholarships; buti 
to the extent that our general income is needed for the maintenance of the 
Gymnasium, to that extent we cannot achieve our purpose. 

Knowing that the goal of $300,000 is needed and in the hope that it, 
can be obtained the Committee charged with responsibility of raising the' 
necessary funds, of which Helen Henry is chairman, has recommended to 
the officers of the Alumnae Association that Alumnae contributions for the- 
year ending August 31, 1956 be credited to the Gymnasium Fund. The 
officers, I am told, have enthusiastically adopted the recommendation. 

Apart from this the campaign will end December 31, 1955. Efforts will 
be made this fall to obtain further gifts from parents and friends. What is 
needed most are several large gifts. 

Abbot will soon have a new Gymnasium. I hope that all who can will 

come to Abbot to see it. 

Very sincerely yours, 

Robert I. Hunneman 

President of Board of Trustees 



George Ezra Abbot Memorial 
Gymnasium Fund 



Total — $219,180 



Alumnae 

Parents 

Friends 



$ 31,879 
$ 51,881 
$135,420 



Abbot Second Century Alumnae Fund 

May 17, 1954 — August 30, 1955 

Gymnasium - $31,879 

Scholarships $ 1,480 

1057 Contributors 32% of Total Alumnae 

Average Gift — $32 



Leading Contributions 
by Class 








Highest Number 
of Contributors 


1915 — S1670 
1916 — $1651 
1927 — Si 560 
1922 — Si 197 
1893 — Si 170 








1 955— 63 
1916—34 

1 929— 30 
1 930— 30 
1950—29 






Highest Percentage 
of Contributors 










J 955— IOO % 
1916— 77% 

1891— 75% 

J 9i5— 75% 
1902— 68% 







ABBOT SECOND CENTURY ALUMNAE FUND 

List of Contributors 

May 17, 1954 — August 31, 1955 

"("Regular contributor 
Percentages below class numerals indicate per cent of a class contributing 
to Fund, and the amount represents the total contributions from the class. 



1878 
50%— $5 
"j" Florence Swan 

1880 

$25 
♦Harriet Smith Wilcox 
1884 
25%— $25 
Annah Kimball 

1886 
13%— $35 
*|Mary Gorton Darling 

1887 
50°/ o — $65 
Angie Dunton Purrington 
Jean Louise Jillson 
"("Harriet H. Thwing 

1889 
63%— $202.50 
Lilian Ellis Emerson 
Dora Mason McLaughlin 
| Flora Mason 
f Alice Newton Judd 
"fAnnis Spencer Gilbert 

1890 
33%— $50 
Anna Johnston 

1891 
75%— $54 
■j" Caroline Goodell 
Anna Wells Bigelow 
fKatherine Winegarner Spencer 

1892 
40%— $50 
fjane B. Carpenter 
Alice Fleek Miller 

1893 
33%— $1170 
t Caddie Abbott Smith 
| Elizabeth Nichols Bean 
Belle Pearson Brooks 
Mary Thompson 



1894 
24%— $50 
Aida Dunn Furst 
Fanny Duren Boyd 
fMyra Hayes 
Ellen Lombard 

1895 
44%— $287 
f Bessie Adams Tryon 
Marjory Clark Barker 
Charlotte K. Drury 
Kirty Eddy Shaw 
fHelen Muzzy 
Grace Simonton Young 
Marion Somers Wise 
Laura Wentworth Richards 

1896 
33%— $250 
Mary Bradley Leslie 
Agnes Brown 
f Isabel Chapin Gould 
| Edith Magee 
Jessie Ross Gibby 
In Memory of Frances Saunders 

Morgan 
■j" Eleanor Thomson Castle 

1897 
38%— $210 
Rose Churchill 
Frances Hinkley Quinby 
Lillian Miller Troutman 
Marion Priest Fuller 
•j" Gertrude Ware Bunce 
Marion B. Morse 

1898 
21%— $145 
Lucy Hartwell Peck 
Harriet C. Lord 
jMabelle Norris Oakley 
Florence Pease 
Ethel Perley Tyler 
"j-Amy Stork Kydd 



1899 
55%— $765 
"fRuth Childs Young 
Emma Clark Mock 
Helen Dana Porter 
Ethel Gibbs Marr 
Estelle Greenough Easton 
fLucy Hegeman Hubbell 
Marie Hershey Bliss 
f Lilian Mooers Smith 
Alice Titcomb Burke 
f Leila Virgin 
fMay Young Cox 
Helen Dana Porter 

1900 
61%— $119 
Mary Carleton 
Grace Chapman Spear 
Rose Day Keep 
Carrie Harmon Shaw 
Ethel Hazen Lillard 
Edith Johnston Bliss 
fMary Morgan Norwood 
| Lottie Redford 
Winifred Todd Mills 
Mabel Tubman Taylor 
f Alice Wood Hodgdon 

1901 
50%— $952 
Elizabeth Bacon Greene 
"j" Frieda Billings Cushman 
"j" Ethel Brooks Scott 
Helen Buck 
f Evelyn Carter Giles 
Lillie Dodge Brewster 
Emily Emerson Day 
Katharine French Rockwell 
jHelen Hale 
j Delight Hall Gage 
Edna Kidder Baldwin 
Harriet A. Lee 
"("Josephine Pope 



♦Contributed prior to death 



IO 



1902 
68%— S3 70 
[Miriam F. Carpenter 
Harriett Chase Newell 
Ruth Cobb Bryant 
Catharine Deacon Palmer 
Margaret Eshbaugh Adams 
Florence Fletcher Preston 
Tirzah Hall 
Belle Johnston Rumford 
•[Mildred Mooers Poore 
fHonora Spalding 

1903 
53%— $226 
I Edith Burnham Roberts 
Jessie Corbin Bates 
| *Jean David Blunt 
IfAletta Hegeman 
I Nancy Holland Hubbard 
Helen Packard McBride 
j Katharine Scott 
i Margaret Wilson Gerber 

1904 
57°/ — $865 
Helen Abbott Allen 
! Elizabeth Case Staege 
Helen Childs Baldwin 
In Memory of Marion W. 

Cooper 
i Mary Davis Lee 
I Sarah Field 
iRuth Lane Treadway 
I "[Elizabeth Schneider 
iAbbie Smith Taylor 
) fMary Byers Smith 
Emily Stearns Giese 
Julia Wallace Gage 

1905 
27°/ — $120 
. Amy Blodgett Moore 
f Frances Cutler Knickerbocker 
Fanny Erving Arundale 
Fanny Hazen Ames 
Ruth Pringle 
i. Frances Tyer Crawford 

1906 
41%— $391 
I Ruth Adams Downer 
i Helen Ellis Rice 
I Sarah Hincks 
f Mary Jordan Goodrich 
*Carita Kimball Russell 
I'fEvaline Korn Cookman 



?*Contributed prior to death 



f Constance Parker Chipman 
fRena Porter Hastings 
Maud W. Sprague 

1907 
46%— $425 
tMabel Allen Buxton 
fMarjory Bond Crowley 
■[Laura Howell 
Clara Hukill Leeds 
Jean McEwen Brown 
Leonora Parsons Cooper 
■[Maria Pillsbury Campbell 
tAnna May Richards Folsom 
Louise Richards Rollins 
Alice Webster Brush 
*Oena Whyte Hall 

1908 
31°/ — $633 
■[Helen Buss Towle 
■[Gertrude Gaunt Barnes 
"[Agnes Bertha Ewart 
f Mary A. Howell 
Winifred Ogden Lindley 
f Esther Parker Lovett 
■[Dorothy Taylor 
■[Marion Towle Sturgis 
•[Ruth Van Vliet Fawcett 
Elizabeth Watts 

1909 
63%— $292 
Mary Bourne Boutell 
Dorothy Drake Ulmo 
Mildred Elliott Smith 
Leila Fowler Throckmorton 
Elizabeth S. Fuller 
t Edith Gardner Tobey 
Janet Gorton 
Hannah Haines Webb 
Helen M. Hazlewood 
Alice Holt Jenkins 
Sarah Knox 
Louise Norpell Meek 
Gladys Perry Miller 
Marjori Soule Byers 
Helen Weber Mitchell 
t Frances Wright Kimball 

1910 
65%— $339 
Margaret Gooch Barney 
t Clarissa Hall Hammond 
"[Laura Jackson Austin 
Lillie Johnson Smith 
Grace Kellogg 
Ethel Kelsey Perry 
Lucy Kilby 



Persis Mclntire Downey 
f Ruth Murray Moore 
f Ruth Newcomb 
Ethel Reigeluth Darby 
"[Emily Silsby Morgan 
|Lydia Skolfield Parsons 
Ethel Swain Smith 
f Louise Tuttle Abbott 

1911 

67%— $278 
Marion Bemis Schlesinger 
f Dorothy Bigelow Arms 
Persis Bodwell Millspaugh 
Anna Boynton Hemenway 
"[Marion Brown 
Olivia Flynt 
M. Rhoda Green 
Mary Hall Lewis 
Dora Heys Pym 
Miriam Howard Bushnell 
"[Edith Johnson Donald 
Dorothy McCormick Mosser 
Rebecca Newton Weedon 
Ruth Niles Thompson 
"[Frances M. Pray 
Margaret Strong Hill 
"[Henrietta Wiest Zaner 
"[Jessie Wightman Jones 

1912 
54%— $435 
Anne Blauvelt Sanderson 
Mildred Chutter 
Ruth Draper Hyde 
Alice H. Hazlewood 
"[Barbara Moore Pease 
Dorothy Simpson Faith 
Nora Sweeney 

1913 
52%— $637.50 
Class Gift 
Mary Boyd Higgins 
Mildred Bryant Kussmaul 
"[Helen Danforth Prudden 
Margaret Day Danforth 
Olga Erickson Tucker 
"[Gladys Estabrook Blanchard 
"[Hazel Goodrich Waugh 
Helen Hersey Heffernan 
Marion Martin Teeson 
Jane Newton Sheldon 
f Dorothy Perkins Estabrook 
Doris Elizabeth Sawyer 
Helene Symmes 
Louise Thompson Cottrell 
■[Margaret Wilkins 



II 



1914 

46%— $5 18.50 
Louise Allaman Austin 
Elisabeth Bartlett Jenks 
| Harriett Bowman Meeker 
Rosamond Gens Lehnert 
Helen Gilbert Rich 
•f Elsie Gleason Sloan 
Hildegarde Gutterson Smith 
f Helen Hamblet Dyer 
Helen Hanscom Winslow 
Mary Hildreth 
Jessie Lumsden Sherrard 
Katharine Selden McDuffie 
Ella Stohn Getchell 
f Alice Sweeney 
Marie Winsor Appleby 
Margaret Wylie Ware 

1915 
75°/ — $1670 
Elizabeth Allen Belknap 
Rena Atwood Benson 
Muriel Baker Wood 
Marion Barnard Cole 
Eleanor Bartlett Atwater 
fMarian Bayley Buchanan 
jMarion Brooks 
Phyllis Brooks Stevens 
In Memory of Marion 

Hamblet Greene 
Aurelia Hillman Sanders 
Freda Joslin Sprague 
fMattie Larrabee Whittemore 
Catherine C. Leach 
Elizabeth F. Leach 
Vivien Mitchell Hall 
Charlotte Morris Perot 
t Jessie Nye Blodgett 
Gertrude Shackleton Hacker 
Josephine Tonner Guernsey 
tMarion Winklebleck Hess 
Harriette Woolverton Robinson 

1916 
77°/ — $1651 
Vera Allen 

Eleanor Black Draffan 
Ada Brewster Brooks 
Dorothy Dann 
Myrtle Dean Lewis 
"[Charlotte Eaton 
Eleanor Frary Rogers 
Helene Hardy Bobst 
Dorothy Higgins Rand 
jMildred Jenkins Dalrymple 



Marian Kent Mitchell 
Esther Kilton 
Louise Kimball Jenkins 
Louise King Childs 
Ruth Laton Creesy 
Agnes J. Leslie 
Ruth Lindsay Kuhnle 
Inga Little Bouve 
Marion Mellor Dean 
Grace Merrill Emery 
Frances Moses Schubert 
t Dorothy Niles 
Katharine Odell Randall 
Ruth Ottman Steiger 
Bernice Overend Merrill 
| Eugenia Parker 
"j" Dorothy Pillsbury Bartlett 
Alice Prescott Plumb 
f Helene Sands Brown 
Marion Selden Nash 
Emma Stohn Larrabee 
Esther Van Dervoort Howe 
Josephine Walker Woodman 
Elizabeth Wood Gage 

1917 
25%— $200 
Miriam Bacon Chellis 
Harriet Balfe Nalle 
Carita Bigelow Moore 
f Frances M. Cartland 
Frances K. Gere 
Lucy Lane Church 
Harriet Murdock Andersson 
Cornelia Newcomb Lattin 
f Cornelia Sargent Battershill 

1918 
35%— $398 
Ruth Allen Healy 
| Irene Atwood 
| Louise Bacon Fuller 
Gwendolen Brooks Reynolds 
Kathryn Cooper Richards 
Dorothy Cutler Burr 
Helen Cutting 
f Marion Hubbard Craig 
Doris Kishlar Crouch 
fEmmavail Luce Severinghaus 
Marion McPherson 
Martha Miller Reese 
Katherine Pinckney Whistler 
Julie Sherman Tibbetts 
Helen Snow Vigue 
Margaret B. Speer 
Dorothy Stalker 
jMargaret Van Voorhis 



1919 

48%— $483 
Elizabeth Armstrong 
Kathryn Beck Dow 
Marea Blackford Fowler 
Gretchen Brown Knights 
Katharine Coe Taylor 
Mary Cole Day 
Anna Davidson Wright 
Cora Erickson Ayers 
Grace Francis Jenkins 
Mildred Frost Eaton 
Josephine Hamilton Leach 
Harriette Harrison 
Elizabeth Hartel Coogan 
fjane Holt Atkinson 
Muriel Johnson Lovejoy 
"f Grace Kepner Noble 
Grace Leyser Boynton 
Elizabeth Luce Moore 
Virginia McCauley Otis 
Mary Martin 
Geraldine Murray Stanton 
Marian Nichols Fiore 
Kathreen Noyes Pettit 
Nadine Scovill Young 
fMargaret Taylor Stainton 
Edith Wright Parr 

1920 

32%— $539 
Margaret Ackroyd Hunt 
Hope Allen Brown 
Helen Donald Coupe 
Vivien Gowdy Larabee 
f Lillian Grumman 
Katherine G. Hamblet 
t Elizabeth Hawkes Miller 
Hilda Heath 
f Paulina Miller Patrick 
+Muriel Moxley Hubbard 
Helen Polk Barker 
t Louise Robinson 
f Elizabeth Stewart Pieters 
Helen Thiel Gravengaard 
Dorothy M. Tyler 
t Charlotte Vose Clark 
Georgia Warren Gauld 
| Margaret Worman Thompson 

1921 
33%— $188.50 
Ethel Dixon McGee 
Lois Fleming 
t Frances Gasser Stover 
Florence Hinckley Bishop 



12 



Frances Keany Rickard 

.Dorothy Martin Buracker 

Elizabeth McClellan Stefani 

Edith Page Bennett 

Marian Parker Paulson 

Mildred Peabody 

Mary Peirce Carty 

Helen Roser 

Jessamine Rugg Patton 

Catherine Swift Weller 

Elizabeth Thompson Winslow 
I Frances Thompson Heely 
I Henrietta Thompson Beal 
! t Eleanor Voorhees 

1922 
37%— $1197 
i fjane B. Baldwin 
I Phyllis Bankart Paulsen 
i f Gwendolyn Bloomfield Tillson 
Elizabeth Brewster Thompson 
Isabel Brown Crawford 
Geneva Burr Sanders 
Katherine Damon Kletzien 
Ruth Dewey York 
Dorothea Flagg Smith 
Beatrice Goff 
Barbara Goss 
fLois Kirkham Hart 
Helen Knight Wilkinson 
Mary Mallory Pattison 
Elizabeth MacPherran Worcester 
Marian Saunders Cheesborough 
Alice VanSchmus Smith 
Janet Warren Winslow 
fSusana Welborn Osborn 
Anne C. Whinery 
Dorothy Williams Davidson 

1923 
31%— $588 
[Nathalie Bartlett Farnsworth 
fMartha Buttrick Rogers 
Sarah Finch Hartwell 
Elizabeth Flagg Dow 
Francelia Holmes 
Ruth Holmes Durant 
Catherine Miller McCurdey 
fDolores Osborne Hall 
Elizabeth Peck Watrous 
Mary E. Rudd 
fMary Swartwood Sinclaire 
Miriam Sweeney McArdle 
Dorothy Taylor Booth 
Miriam Thompson Kimball 
Eleanor Warren 
f Esther Wood Peirce 



1924 

35%— $382.50 
In Memory of Elisabeth Barss 

Eastman 
Ruth Beach Newsom 
Sybil Bottomley Talman 
Elizabeth Bragg Mcintosh 
Margaret Bush Ham 
Helen Epler Baketel 
Rebekah W. George 
Caroline Hall Wason 
Betty Harrington Wilson 
Katherine Hart Mitchell 
Eleanore Ireland Saunders 
Helen Keating Ott 
Margaret McDonald Vester 
Margaret McKee DeYoe 
Ruth Pritchard deRivera 
Genevra C. Rumford 
Marion Shryeck Wagner 
Constance Twichell 
Elizabeth Willson Naetzker 

1925 
29%— $107 
f Dorothy Beeley Marsh 
Elizabeth Burtnett Horle 
Ruth Connolly Burke 
Eve Cross Glendenning 
Charlotte Hanna Beveridge 
t Eunice E. Huntsman 
Evelyn McDougall Hay 
Barbara Nelson Twombly 
Nettie Pritchard Potter 
Elizabeth Righter Farrar 
Doris von Culin Breyer 
Phyllis Yates Shields 

1926 
36%— $614 
Adelaide V. Black 
•[Barbara Bloomfield Wood 
Edith Bullen Creden 
f Katharine Clay Sawyer 
Ruth Deadman McLennan 
f Frances Flagg Sanborn 
Evelyn M. Glidden 
Gracie Griffin Westman 
Jane R. Hovey 
Edith Ireland Wood 
Suzanne Loizeaux 
Florence MacDougall Ranney 
Virginia Merritt Helfferich 
Alice Perry 
Edda Renouf Gould 
Olive Rogers Smith 
Sylvea Shapleigh Smith 



jCarlotta Sloper 
Ruth Stafford Lamprey 

1927 
32%— $1560.50 
Helen M. Amesse 
Mary Ayers Hower 
Helen Connolly McGuire 
Julie Cross Musk 
Ellen C. Faust 
Dorothy French Gray 
Persis Goodnow Brown 
June Hinman Marques 
Miriam Houdlette Walsh 
Emily House Maidment 
•f" Pauline Humeston Carter 
Marion Ireland Conant 
Nancy Kimball Fowle 
•("Margaret Nay Gramkow 
■j-Ruth M. Perry 
Virginia Smith Fuller 
Martha T utile Haigis 
Sydna V. White 

1928 

24%— $261 
Christine Bliss Billings 
Katherine Bornemann Zumbusch 
Ruth Cushman Hill 
Winifred Dudley Burnham 
f Virginia Gay d'Elseaux 
f Beatrice Lane Mercer 
Susan Ripley Ward 
Emily Sloper Shailer 
Anne Sutton Weld 
Theodora Talcott Slater 
Barbara Vail Cristy 

1929 
48%— $869 
Class Gift 

■[Louise Anthony Castor 
Katherine Blunt Polsby 
t Catherine Bowden Barnes 
Gertrude Campion Soutar 
Mary Eaton Graf 
Marjorie Ellis Foster 
Olive Elsey Weigle 
Barbara Folk Howe 
f Polly Francis Loesch 
Harriet Gilmore Yoh 
Lois Hardy Daloz 
fjeanette M. Hubbard 
Elizabeth Hulse Freeman 
Joyce Jarman McNamara 
Mary Elizabeth Jones 
Roberta Kendall Kennedy 



i3- 



Katherine Kennedy Beardsley 
Estelle Levering Chestnut 
Mary E. Macdonald 
Catherine A. McDonnell 
Elizabeth McKinney Smiley 
Dorothy Newcomb Rogers 
Elisabeth Osborne Bacon 
Despina Plakias Messinesi 
Ruth Shulze Hammond 
Millicent Smith Uppvall 
Grace E. Stephens 
Jean E. Stewart 
Elizabeth Taylor Amazeen 
Rosamond Wheeler Putnam 

1930 

55%— $937 
Louise Atkinson Dunsford 
fRuth Baker Johnson 
Donna Brace Kroeck 
Elizabeth Brown Guild 
Alice Canoune Coates 
t Rosamond Castle Olivetti 
Hortense G. Dunbar 
Kathryn Dutton Leidy 
Alice Eckman Mason 
"fKathie Fellows Ingraham 
f Katharine Foster Rainbolt 
Florence Gardner Balius 
Cornelia Gould Scott 
Grace Hadley MacMillan 
Barbara Healey Holland 
Christine Hollands Struck 
Barbara Lamson Cummings 
Barbara Lord Mathias 
Dora Maxwell Harrison 
Mary Jane Owsley Warwick 
Elizabeth Perry Lewis 
Helen Ripley 
Mary Shepard Wiley 
Marianna Smith Hile 
Elizabeth Southworth Sutton 
Vivian Southworth Gerstell 
Elizabeth Stout Volz 
Frances Sullivan Sullivan 
Elizabeth Tarr Morse 
Marjorie Turner Fisher 

1931 

42°/ — $193 
Class Gift 
Doris Allen Carroll 
Katherine Allen Babson 
Metta Bettels Smith 
Emily Bullock 
■f Nancy Can Holmes 



Abby L. Castle 
Faith Chipman Parker 
Mary Elizabeth Dix Goddard 
Frances Flory Jones 
Barbara Graham Holland 
Carol Grosvenor Myers 
Dorothy Hunt Bassett 
Sylvia Larsson Briggs 
Lisette Micoleau Tillinghast 
Margaret O'Leary White 
Marcia Rudd Keil 
Frances Scudder Glisson 
Mary Smead Homlar 
C. Jane Sullivan 
Gertrud Van Peursem Bell 
Nanine Wheeler Allender 
Marie Whitehill 

1932 

31%— $402 
| Helen Allen Henry 
Isabel K. Arms 
Elizabeth Bigler deMasi 
Elizabeth M. Boyce 
Katharine Brigham 
| Virginia Brown Woods 
Helen Cutler Appleton 
Florence Dunbar Robertson 
Constance Hoag Porter 
Virginia Lawton Wolfe 
f Eunice Randall 
Dorothy Richardson 
Georgia K. Thomson 
Mary Thompson Sherman 
Ruth Tyler Smith 
Atossa F. Welles 
Harriet Wright Miller 

1933 

36°/ — $397 
Mary Burnham Gazlay 
"("Margaret Chase Johnson 
Rozilla Chase Roberts 
Ann Cole Gannett 
Marcia Gaylord Norman 
Carolyn Guptill Hansen 
Alice Hill Turner 
Ursula Ingalls Rockwell 
t Frances McGarry Ogg 
Jane Ritchie Shaw 
Ethel Rogers Foster 
Clara Smith Clark 
Elizabeth Snyder Cady 
Mariatta Tower 
Betty Weaver Van Wart 
Martha Wind Finger 



1934 
41%— $557 
In Memory of Ann Byron 

Richtmyre 
Katharine Damon Reed 
Marguerite Galloway 
Eleanor Harryman McQuarie 
f Cassandra Kinsman Dexter 
Nancy Marsh Gares 
Margaret Morrill Wilkins 
I Carolyn Muzzy 
Sarah O'Reilly Loria 
Anne Place Henderson 
Mary Rockwell Stewart 
Mabel Savage Van Stone 
f Ruth Stott Peters 
Jane Tracy MacGruer 

1935 
45%— $301 
Cathleen Burns Elmer 
Evelyn Chappell Swayze 
Laura Chedel Miller 
Claire Cregg Derby 
Ann Cutler Brecheen 
Georgeanna Gabeler Selden 
Jane Dawes McClennan 
f Susan Hildreth Goodwin 
Martha S. Howe 
Anne Hurlburt Bradley 
Eleanor Johnson Du Toit 
Geraldine Johnson 
Elizabeth Kennedy Woodward 
Frances McTernan Coan 
Cynthia Madden Beebe 
f Elizabeth Morgan Foster 
Elizabeth Murphy Garrison 
Claire Oppenheim Marum 
Shirley Powers Haseltine 
Lucia Nunez Mason 
Ellen Rivinius Hill 
Katharine Scudder Fraser 
f Shirley Smith King 
Eliese Strahl Cutler 
Barbara Symonds Day 

1936 
35%— $322.50 
Sally Burns Bowen 
Charlotte Dane von Breton 
fMary Dooley Bragg 
Grace Nichols Knight 
f Barbara Reinhart Livingston 
Elinor Robinson Goodwin 
Caroline Rockwell Stevens 
Anne Russell Loring 
Elizabeth Sargent Crandell 



14 



Sally Scales Phelan 
• f Pauline Spear Chapin 
Mary L. Swan 
•[Mary Trqfton Simonds 

1937 
46%— $482 
Corinne Brooks Cornish 
Nancy Burns McArdle 
f Thelma Cutter Leuenberger 
Cynthia Holbrooh Sumner 
Lucy Hulburd Richardson 
Elizabeth Inman Kirkpatrick 
Elisabeth Joost Todd 
Nancy Kincaid Vars 
Elizabeth McArdle McDermott 
Jeanette K. Nevius 
fjeannette Partridge Harrison 
Geraldine Peck Rockwell 
Barbara Pierpoint Craig 
•[Martha Ransom Tucker 
Priscilla Richards Phenix 
Louise Risley Stever 
Ruth Rose Stothoff 
Ellen Simpson Martin 
Jane Stevenson Wunsch 
Martha Sweeney Read 
Elizabeth Swint McFarland 
Joan Todd Wilkinson 
Priscilla Wonson Hahn 

1938 
36%— $598 
Beverly Bridge Moore 
Marjorie Coll Fields 
Ann Dooley 
Mary Elliot Brown 
fRosa Fletcher Crocker 
Norma Forsyth Williams 
Diana Greene Helfrich 
Marjorie Holt Campbell 
Janice Hunter Aitken 
Barbara Lee Mill 
Elizabeth McBride Chapman 
Sara G. Peck 
Phyllis Saunders Simpson 
Anne Simpson White 
Constance Thurber Prudden 
Jean Tilton Melby 
Mary Toohey Kruse 
Barbara Tudbury Allen 
Jane Vogt Cooke 
Carok Whittemore Fellows 

1939 
25%— $194 
Lucia Buchanan Livingston 
Olive I. Butler 



Mary Koch Danos 
Barbara Leland Pearson 
Marjorie MacMullen Freytag 
Florence Mooney Doty 
Polly Pancoast Tunkey 
Lloyd Pierce Smith 
Charlotte Skinner Mills 
Jeanne Waugh Harney 

1940 
34%— $610 
Marie Bertram Vander Gheynst 
Gisela Bolten Hogan 
Lee Burnett Peterson 
Frances Chandler Futch 
f Mollie Chase Foster 
Phyllis Crocker England 
f Elaine Dalrymple Borowski 
Barbara Fowler Borden 
Dorothy Garry Warlick 
Nancy Harrison 
•[Mary Howard Nutting 
f Marietta Meyer Ekberg 
Mary Naff Pugh 
Anne Rivinius Wild 
fMary Spaulding Powell 
Elizabeth Travis Sollenberger 
Rachel Whitney Davis 
Nancy Wilson Ainslie 
Gertrude Wind Scheft 

1941 
46%— $322.50 
"[Joan Belden McDonough 
Jeannette Biart Warren 
Joyce Curran Nunez 
Dorothy Dean Johnson 
Nancy Eccles Roome 
Mary Elizabeth Erkert Altorfer 
Dorothy Fiske Winnette 
Nancy Gerrish MacFadyen 
Alda Grieco Cesarini 
Josephine Hartwell Boddington 
Christine Hill Winship 
Doris Jones Hannegan 
Nancy Kelley Park 
Joan List 

•f Suzanne Long Reed 
Margery Martin Martin 
Verniece Moody Bishop 
"[Julie Nelson Williams 
Eloise Perkins Beck 
Jane Philbin Dreyfuss 
Emily Ruth Poynter 
Helen Stott 

| Frances Troub Roberts 
Joan Waugh Campbell 



Dorothy White Wicker 
Nancy Whittier Atkinson 

1942 
35%— $559 
Irene Abbott MacPherson 
Suzanne Bates Heath 
Mary Bertucio 
Ethel Bolton Henderson 
Marjorie Dean Marsden 
Miriam Douglas Sanner 
Betty Jean England Olsen 
Dorothy Erkert Simon 
Elizabeth Fowler Warrick 
Margaret Goodman Decker 
| Beatrice Hardy Verdery 
f Barbara Hill Kennedy 
Janice Lenane Scott 
Louise Leslie Oxenham 
Theodora Manning Alexander 
Margaret McFarlin 
"[Marilyn Menschik Westaway 
Ruth Rathbone Hildreth 
"[Gretchen Roemer Gay ton 
f Jane Rutherford 
"[Ruth Snider Bernstein 
Elsie Williams Keyaha 
Rose Wind Stone 

1943 
31%— $258 
"[Mary Alice Beckman Huide- 

koper 
Elizabeth Bennett Ewing 
Nancy Corwin Wintter 
Jean Craig Fitzgerald 
Amelia Daves Kopald 
Jean Hansen Ashbaugh 
Margaret Howard Long 
Margaret Janssen Gray 
Barbara Lindsay Boynton 
Ann Loughbridge Konstam 
Anne Pearson 
Sylvia Peters Agler 
Patricia Pettengill Whitaker 
jBettye Rutherford McCouch 
Themis Sarris Ellis 
Cynthia Teel Vail 
"[Joyce Toffa Rudolph 

1944 
41%— $379 
Elizabeth Bertucio Martuscello 
Nan Buland 

Jacqueline Calvin Johnson 
Elisabeth Colson Tierney 
Patricia Damon Niswander 



l 5 



Elizabeth Frank Abeles 
Aagot Hinrichsen Cain 
M. Louise Honnen Tutt 
| Ruth Kir stein Turkanis 
Frances MacDonald Thompson 
Emily McMurray Mead 
Theresa Mastrangelo Mahoney 
Nancy Nicholas Wengert 
Carol Paradise 
Shirley Rhodes Lowe 
fMarion Stevens Harris 
Nancy Stone Heymann 
Margaret Travis Atwood 
Martha Watkins Curry 
Shirley Woodams Hoesterey 

1945 

31°/ — $221 

Barbara Ball Bacon 
Barbara Beecher 
Martha Boynton Pawle 
f Esther Buffer d Watstein 
Phyllis Hardon Gander 
Joan Holdsworth Arrott 
Sally Leavitt Cheney 
Suzanne Leland Le Feber 
Marion Marsh Birney 
Marjorie Milne Winston 
Katharine Mulford 
Hilary Paterson Cleveland 
f Cynthia Smith McFalls 
Shirley Sommer Holzwarth 
Joan Sweeney 
f Mary Taylor 
Beatrice Van Cleve Lee 
Edith Walker Upham 

1946 

36%— $184 

Patricia Bowne Rickenbacher 
M. Ellen Brumback 
Mary Burton Blakney 
Jenny Copeland Dufford 
Ann Hellweg Warren 
Mary Howe Brumback 
Patricia Keefer 
Janet Kingsbury Littlefield 
Frances Little 
Cynthia Noone 
Sally North Jones 
Phyllis Rairdon Wilce 
Luetta Robertson Kolflat 
Marjorie Sommer Tucker 
Gail Sullivan 
Mavis Twomey Cox 



Deborah Wiggin Cameron 
Elizabeth Woodruff Caperton 

1947 



38%—: 

Nancy Brumback Kruvand 

Janice Cole 

Helen Dowd Richards 

■j" Virginia Eason Weinmann 

Edith Flather 

Dorthea Hall Kernan 

Corallie Hanly 

Sally Humason 

Patricia Jaffer Abernethy 

Joy Kolins Peisch 

Jane Lewis Gleason 

Sylvia Lyford Morgan 

Mary Lou Miller Hart 

fMartha Morse Abbot 

Jean Ritchey Bora 

Susanne Robbins deWolf 

Carolyn Sackett Coleburn 

Maud Savage 

Nancy Scripture Garrison 

Darlene Sharp Fiske 

Geraldine Treadway Dampier 

Christine von Goeben Curtis 

Marion White Singleton 

1948 
38°/ — $375 
Martha Ball Geiken 
Martha Barber Lowrance 
Katharine Bigelow Fitzgerald 
Nadine Cookman Price 
Alicia Cooper Wright 
Barbara Dake Johnson 
Sue Davis Snyder 
Nancy Elliot Stewart 
Judith Erdmann 
Mary Farrar 
Fairfield Frank DuBois 
Jacqueline Kay 
Mary Lackey Stowell 
Sarah Lunt 

Marguerite Moss Heery 
Nancy Nalle 
Elizabeth Ogden Tod 
Eleanor Parker Cushman 
Ann Robinson Joyce 
Ann Sarolea Bartholomew 
Julie Schauffler Fisher 
Charlotte Stone Wolf 
Barbara Sugar Connor 
Helen Tasche North 



Helen Taylor Dodd 
Eleanor Wallis 

1949 

24°/ — $120.50 
Mercy Barnes 
Margaret Black Dintruff 
Patricia Bleecker 
Fredericka Brown Bettinger 
Tita Gonzalez Mann 
Barbara Hamby McLane 
Nancy Jeffers Whittemore 
Faith Johnson Beard 
Anne Miskell Forand 
Madelon Olney Paglee 
Esther Peirce 
J. Wendy Scott Scott 
Deborah Williams Troemner 

1950 



48%- 
Joan Aldrich 
Cynthia Atwood Couch 
Elizabeth Bradley Hubbard 
Patricia Burke Wright 
Elspeth Caldwell 
M. Jane Currier 
Georgette Davis Ferrante 
Anne Dunsford Hockmeyer 
"j" Cynthia Faigle Quinn 
Beverley Flather Edwards 
Jane Gqfill Towner 
Roberta Gibbon Coates 
Elizabeth Goodspeed Fellner 
Julia Holt 

Coralie Huberth Sloan 
Margaretta Kitchell Stabler 
Judith Lange Fogertey 
Mary Lee 
Mary Lester Clark 
Ann Lindamood Twyford 
Ann Merriwether Disharoon 
Ann Moser 
Elizabeth Moss 
Deborah Redfield 
Alice Russell 
Nancy Shulze Lamb 
Sarah Stevens MacMillan 
Sally Stilson Athan 
Gloria Toffa Portnoy 

1951 

31°/ — $222 
Agnes Bergh Beverley 
Ann Budd Lovell 
Clemency Chase 



16 



Dorothy Colburn Rice 
.Barbara Daugherty 
Patricia Driscoll 
Katharine Farrar 
Sylvia Finger 
Carolin Furst 
Barbara Gibson Roth 
Paula Holden 
Susan Kimball 
Sally Mason Crowell 
Dorothy Massie 
Harriette McConnel 
Joan Nielsen 
Polly Paradise 
Rosamond Reifsnyder Peck 
Frances Russell Phelps 
Georgia Stanley 
Sylvie Wallace 

1952 
38%— $206.50 
Betsy Aldrich 
Martha Artz 
Joan Baird 
Lorna Ball 
Sally Binenkorb 
Harriett Brown 
Molly Edson 
Jane Edwards Holbrook 
Cynthia Emerson 
Persis Goodnow 
Mary Hawes 
Leila Hutchins 
Ethel Kenah 
Janet Leach 
Ann Lyons 
Simone Mathey 
Julia Merriwether 
Clara Reynolds Palmer 
Anne Sanborn 
Sandra V. Smith 
Deborah Snover 
Anna Stefani 

1953 
25°/ — $652.79 
Class Gift 



Eleanor Edwards 
Julie Gaines 
Dorothy Giles 
Mary Goodnow 
Mary Grant 
Martha Gross 
Carol Hardin 
Martha Horsefield 
Cornelia Nyce 
Martha Schneider 
Ellen Smith 
Natalie Starr 
Audrey Taylor 
Judith Wilcox 

1954 
34°/ — $933.98 
Martha Belknap 
Valjeanne Brodeur 
Louise Marie deCholnoky 
Nancy Donnelly 
Beverly Gramkow 
Betsy Harmon 
Elizabeth Hilgenberg 
Margaret Johnson 
Winifred Johnson 
Gretchen Kase 
Suzanne Larter 
Frances Nolde 
Maris Oamer 
Patricia Sanborn 
Vicky Schwab 
Patricia Skillin 
Nancy-Jean Smith 
Patricia Stainton 
Audrey Synnott 
Sylvia Thayer 
Lynn Towner 
Joan Wheeler 
Mary Woolverton 

1955 
100°/ o — $740 

Past Principal 
Marguerite C. Hearsey 



Past Faculty 

J. Hope Baynes 

Helen Bean Juthe 

Adele Bockstedt 

Mrs. A. D. Calhoun 

Mary Carpenter Dake 

Helen Chickering 

Esther Comegys 

Rachel Dowd 

In Memory of Bertha Grimes 

Sargent 
Barbara Humes Euston 
Maud C. Morgan 
Dorothy Patten Minard 
Virginia Peddle 
Gertrud Rath 
Elizabeth C. Rohrbach 
Justina Ruiz-de-Conde 
Pamela Tinker 
Dorothea Wilkinson 
Agnete Wulff 

Trustees 

J. Radford Abbot 
Philip K. Allen 
Jane B. Baldwin '22 
Pauline Humeston Carter '27 
Burton S. Flagg 
Helen Allen Henry '32 
Robert I. Hunneman 
Mrs. Wilbur K. Jordan 
Rev. Sidney Lovett 
George F. Sawyer 
Donald B. Smith 
Stoddard M. Stevens, Jr. 
Louise Risley Stever '37 
Gardner Sutton 

Clubs 
Boston 

Eastern Maine 
New York 
Old Colony 

Abbot Academy Alumnae 
Association 



17 



P bailed, RiHfinf . . . cMek&L ta fyou, 

Martha Belknap '54— Secretary of Christian Association Cabinet— Middle- 
bury College 

Clemency Chase '51 — Honors in Art — Wellesley College 

Jane Church '54— Freshman Honors— Vassar College 

Nancy Faraci '52 — Dean's List — Boston University 

Sylvia Finger '51— Samuel Bowles and Sidney S. Cohen Economics Prizes 
in Economics — Smith College 

Martha Horsefield '53— Dean's List— Colby Junior College 

Polly Jackson '53— Treasurer of Student Council— Smith College 

Margaret Johnson '54— Freshman Honors— Vassar College 

Winifred Johnson '54— Freshman Honors— Vassar College 

M. Frances Lane '51— A.B. Degree Cum Laude and Class Treasurer— Rad- 
cliffe College 

Nancy Mercer '51— B.S. Degree with High Honors— Tufts College 

Rosamond Reijsnyder Peck '54— A.B. Degree Cum Laude— Smith College 

Helen A. B. Robertson '18— Outstanding Rating for her work in the Federal 
Extension Service 

Frances Russell Phelps '51— B.S. Degree with High Honors— Tufts College 



Club News 

Boston 

The Boston Abbot Club will hold its first meeting of the year November 
3, at the home of Beverly Brooks Floe '41 (Mrs. Carl F.), 40 Howells St., 
Belmont, Mass. Mrs. Durboro, Remedial Reading Specialist at the Chil- 
dren's Hospital in Boston, will be the speaker. 

Eastern Maine 

The Eastern Maine Abbot Club held a luncheon meeting at the Chee- 
chaho in Damariscotta, July 12. Miss Sullivan brought news of the school. 
A contribution was sent to the Gymnasium Fund. 

18 



3n iHnttnrtam 



1878 

Mary Elvira Wilder died August 14, 1955, 
at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center, 
Washington, D. C. She was ninety-nine 
years old at the time of her death. 

1886 

Evelyn R. Page (Mrs. Horace F. Webb) 
died recently in Bucksport, Maine. 



1905 

Elizabeth Williams (Mrs. Seymour Bal- 
lard) died in September, 1954, in Pasadena, 
California. 

Dr. William G. Thompson, school physi- 
cian since 1937, died suddenly August 13, 
1955. Our sincere sympathy is extended to 
his wife, the former Rowena Rhodes of the 
Abbot faculty. 



Class News 



1889 

Dear Class of 1889, 

I am happy to tell you that I saw both 
Alice Joy Arms and Lil Ellis Emerson during 
the past summer. Alice and her brother, 
James R. Joy, have been at Groton Inn for 
two months and I have seen her several 
times. Her brother is over 90, quite deaf, had 
an operation in the spring on one eye and 
only sees a little, so Alice has been a great 
help to him and will be with him at his home, 
29 Perry St., New York City. 

Alice looks as sweet and lovely as ever. 
She lost her older daughter, Betty, just a 
year ago and the younger one, Mary, has 
just passed away on August 9th, after a long 
illness. Her great trust in God's care is an 
example for all of us. 

On August 28th I had a chance to ride to 
York Village, Maine, with friends who were 
going beyond and would pick me up the 
next day. I spent the 28th and 29th with Lil 
Emerson and how we did talk about Abbot, 
our teachers and classmates and the years 
since. Lil has a nice old home and perfectly 
beautiful grounds with many fine old trees. 
Her son, John L. Emerson, Jr., came in soon 
after my arrival and at once said, "Well, Mrs. 
Gilbert, the last time I saw you was at An- 
dover in June, 1944, when your grand- 
daughter, Betty Rich, and my daughter, 
Nancy, graduated from Abbot." I met his 
wife at that time and again now. 

Lil is tall and straight as she always was, 
still gay and full of fun. You would know 
her anywhere. I had a perfect visit. 



No news of late from Edith Jackson Lewis 
or Dora McLaughlin. 

Nan Spencer Gilbert 

Our sincere sympathy is extended to Alice 
Joy Arms, whose younger daughter, Mary, 
died August 9, 1955, in Buffalo, N. Y. 

1895 

Louise Farrington Hoyt writes, "It just 
doesn't seem possible that I was at Abbot 
sixty years ago (in fact I feel about that age, 
and I am grateful for that) . Perhaps out here 
we keep younger for we have so much sun- 
shine and are out-of-doors so much that one 
forgets to feel old. Two years ago I had a 
beautiful trip to Honolulu, staying a month. 
Last June I had another lovely trip to the 
Canadian Rockies. 

"Mr. Hoyt passed away six years ago, and 
for four years I kept house alone, but found 
it lonely, so rented it furnished, and am at a 
comfortable hotel. I have a pretty apartment 
overlooking the 'Blue Pacific', and enjoy the 
freedom from the care of a house. Having 
lived in La Jolla since 1935, I have many 
friends — so there is club life, dinners, 
luncheons, concerts, theatre, and church. 

"La Jolla is very beautiful, only fifteen 
miles from San Diego, and it is called the 
'Riviera' of California. I have an umbrella 
and a pair of rubbers, but they are never 
used as we have about three rainy days a 
year. 

"I have many happy memories, and cer- 
tainly Abbot is one of them." 



19 



1909 

Beulah McCarty Canterbury has been on a 
freighter trip. She writes, "Rode a camel to 
the Pyramids, climbed the Acropolis, and 
walked down 'The Street Called Straight' at 
Damascus! I had four days at the Istanbul- 
Hilton which is as fabulous as all the col- 
umnists say it is. I swam and sailed in the 
Mediterranean at lovely Mondello near 
Palermo, Sicily." 

1911 

Greetings to all Members of 1911, 

This is the time to begin thinking of our 
class reunion in May 1956. Did you ever 
think you would be a D.O.G.? Personally I 
don't feel like one — but what must those 
dear young gals who sing to us think? Oh 
me!!! 

Before I get too nostalgic, please let me 
thank you for your wonderful letters and 
generous responses to our funds. It is heart- 
warming to hear from you so often — and 
I'm hoping to see you all at Abbot in '56. 
Jessie and Dora are helping me with our 
class reunion plans. 

The new gym is a reality. Dora, Marion 
and I attended the impressive and beautiful 
services, when ground was broken for this 
Memorial building. 

Mary Hall Lewis had a bad time with a 
broken wrist, which is better now. I had an 
interesting letter from her. She attended the 
tea at Mrs. Birney's in Washington, when 
Miss Hearsey was a guest. She got caught up 
with all the Abbot news at that get-together. 
Mary has her first grandson. Her husband, 
Ned, Sr., is now in business for himself — 
Public Relations. Ned, Jr., has a good posi- 
tion in the bank — Army service behind him. 

Persis Bodwell Millspaugh keeps busy with 
Red Cross work which she has carried on for 
15 years. She is also a busy grandmother. 
John, her son, has built a beautiful new 
home just around the corner from them. 
He and his wife have three lovely daughters. 

Henrietta Wiest Zaner is still interested in 
her music — and does two-piano work with 
a friend. She thinks the new gym will be 
wonderful. Just had another letter from 
Henrietta. Her husband has just recovered 
from a serious operation. Clarissa Hall Ham- 
mond, Abbot 1910, visited Henrietta this 
summer. She and her family were returning 
from the Great Smokies. 

We are all looking forward to hearing 



about Dorothy Bigelow Arms's European 
trip. Bring some pictures, please, Dot. 

Frances Pray has a pet parakeet to keep 
her company. She still keeps up her music, 
also leads a very busy life at the Laconia 
Hospital. Her letters would make a very 
interesting book. 

Jack and I had tea with Dora Heys Pym 
and her daughter, Constance. We had a 
delightful afternoon. Dora has some adorable 
grandchildren. 

We miss Margaret Copeland. She is having 
a bad time with arthritis. Will some one 
write to me about her, please. 

8 Carisbrooke Street will always be open 
to you all any time you come to Andover. 
I've given you a few glimpses — come and 
hear the rest in person. 

Loyally, 

Edith Johnson Donald 

1912 

The class extends its sympathy to Beatrice 
Temple Marjerison whose husband died 
unexpectedly, September 6, 1955, at their 
summer home in Chatham, Mass. 

1915 

The class extends its sympathy to Marion 
Bayley Buchanan whose husband died July 
11, in Pittsburgh. 

Betty Leach is in Honolulu as an exchange 
teacher this year. She writes that she swims 
daily at Waikiki Beach. 

1919 

Kitty Coe Taylor and her husband spent 
six weeks touring Holland, Denmark, 
Sweden, Norway, and England last summer. 

1920 

Lucy Ford McCorkindale writes that she 
and her husband have moved to a smaller 
home. Her younger son expects to be dis- 
charged from the Army in October, and will 
study for his master's degree at Iowa State 
College. Lucy has a granddaughter. Lucy's 
address is 3030 Douglas St., Sioux City, 
Iowa. 

1921 

Married 

Lydia Kunkel Eldredge to John Tasker 

Howard, February, 1955. Lydia writes that 

her son, Gregg Eldredge, graduated from 

Rochester University Medical School in 



20 




Camilla and John Erickson, children of 
Dorothy Pease Erickson '26 



June. He will intern at Strong Memorial 
Hospital in Rochester. Her daughter, Mary, 
graduated from Columbia Presbyterian 
Hospital and received her B.S. from Colum- 
bia as well as her R.N. 

1923 

The class will be sorry to learn that 
Martha Buttrick Rogers' mother died August 
17. 

1925 

The class extends its sympathy to Eleanor 
Bodwell Pepion whose mother died June 4, 
1955, in Bradford, Mass. 

1928 

Virginia Gay d'Elseaux writes, "I really am 
disgusted with the lack of news from '28! 
Maybe this will start someone else. Diana, 
our eldest, graduated from Winchester High 
School in June. She was elected a member 
of the National Honor Society, and was one 
of the six speakers at graduation — so we are 
pretty proud of her. On June 29, she flew 
to Mexico for two months with the Experi- 
ment in International Living group. In 
September she entered Hood College on the 
five-year nursing program, and will come 
back to the Massachusetts General for her 
training." 

Beatrice Lane Mercer's daughter, Mary 
Alice, was married in June to Ronald F. 
Jeffries of Arlington, Va. The marriage 
ceremony was performed by Helen Leavitt 



Fisher, Beatrice's Abbot roommate. Her 
daughter, Nancy, will be married in Decem- 
ber. She graduated from Bouve in June, and 
is now working as a Physio-Therapist at the 
Warm Springs Foundation in Gonzales, 
Texas. 

1929 

Elizabeth Bowser Smith writes that her 
husband has been appointed Director of the 
Albright Art Gallery in Buffalo, N. Y. Mr. 
Smith has been Director of the Currier Art 
Gallery in Manchester for the past nine 
years, and Elizabeth has served as Editor of 
the Currier Gallery Bulletin. 

Polly Francis Loesch and her family spent 
the summer in England, Scotland, and 
Wales. 

1931 

Nancy Can Holmes spent the summer in 
Bridgewater, Mass., while her two children 
attended camp on Cape Cod. 

Born 
To Janet Simon Smith, a fifth child and 
third son, Bradford Scott, April 11, 1955. 
She writes, "Our daughter, Holiday, is a 
freshman at Wellesley. Bobby is now thirteen, 
and Kimberly is six!" 

1932 

The following poem by Betty Holihan 
Giblin appeared recently in the Boston 
Herald: 

I opened a box the other day 

And stared at it in grim dismay. 

My brood stood waiting, their muscles 
flexed 

To pounce on plane, or badge, or specs. 

We probed and prodded and pried, 

But found nothing but contents inside. 
Born 

To Helen Cutler Appleton, a son, Thomas 
Cutler, April 29, 1955. 

1933 

The class extends its sympathy to Helen 
Buttrick Livesey whose mother died in Au- 
gust. 

Married 

Lois Chapman Greene to Walter Tarby 
July 16, 1955, in Princeton, Mass. 

1934 

Sally O'Reilly Loria spent four months in 
Italy this summer with her children. 



21 




Cecile Van Peursem Lane '35, her husband 
and children, David, Richard and Robert 

1937 

Constance Knox works for Bakelite Com- 
pany, which is a subsidiary of Union Carbide 
and Carbon Corp. She has an apartment in 
Scarsdale, N. Y. 

We have just learned that Edith Peden is 
now Mrs. Duane C. Doherty. 

Louise Stevenson Anderson writes, "After 
three years in Cuba we left there last Octo- 
ber, spent a few months in Connecticut, then 
sailed at the end of January for Karachi, 
Pakistan, where my husband is commercial 
attache at the American Embassy. We had a 
wonderful trip, stopping at Mediterranean 
ports in France, Italy, Spain, Egypt, and 
Lebanon. We are finding life here very 
different after ten years spent in Latin 
American countries, but it is very interest- 
ing." 

1938 

Married 
Janice Hunter to Hugh G. J. Aitken of 
Brentwood, Essex, England, July 1955, in 
Arlington, Mass. Mr. Aitken served in the 
Royal Air Force during World War II, and 
is a graduate of St. Andrew's University in 
Scotland, the University of Toronto, and 
Harvard University where he received a 
Ph.D. in Economics. He is on the faculty of 
the University of California. 

1939 

Ellen Alden Reed's husband is with Rand 
McNally. 



1942 

Born 

To Jane Bishop Fahey, a daughter, Mar- 
guerite Anne, May 23, 1955. 

To Barbara Hill Kennedy, a third child 
and first son, June 23, 1955. 

1943 

Born 
To Marjorie Lehmann Moats, a third son, 
Kevin, Nov. 1, 1954. Marjorie has moved to 
Chevy Chase, Md., and would love to see 
any Abbot girls who are in the vicinity. 

1945 

Joan Mitchell Neville is president of the 
Board of Directors of the New Canaan Com- 
munity Nursery School and she is at present 
involved in getting a new building for their 
school constructed. Her two oldest children, 
Eddie and Whitney Anne, are attending 
New Canaan Country School this year. 

Born 
To Mary Jane Kurth Longabaugh, a 
third child and first daughter, Heidi Ann, 
August 9, 1955. 

1946 

Nancy Hellweg Warren's husband is teach- 
ing Mathematics at Exeter. Last year Nancy 
taught an adult education class in Ceramics. 
Nancy would love to see any Abbot girls in 
the vicinity of Exeter. 

Engaged 

Gail Sullivan to William Troxell Fleming 
of West Orange, N. J. Mr. Fleming was 
graduated from the Hill School, Pottstown, 
Penna., and from Brown University. He 
received his master's degree in Mechanical 
Engineering from Columbia in 1949. 




Janet and Kip Hutchison, children of Joan 
Carlson Hutchison '40 



22 




Judith, Robert, and Roger Hannegan, 
children of Doris Jones Hannegan '41 



Married 

Patricia Hogan to Monsieur Jean-Francois 
Hauduroy, July 2, 1955, in Lausanne, 
Switzerland. 

Born 

To Sally Allen Waugh, a third child and 
second daughter, Sarah Goodhue, July 19, 
1955. Sally writes that she and her husband 
have just bought a house in Fairfield, Conn., 
and love it. They have nearly three acres of 
land. Her husband is New York representa- 
tive for Pendleton Mills of Portland, Ore. 

To Louise Doyle Collins, a second son and 
fourth child, June 27, 1955. 

To Marian Troub Friedman, a third child 
and second son, Joseph Matthew, April 17, 
1955. 

1947 

Edith Flather has accepted a position as 
Research Assistant at the Mount Wilson and 
Palomar Observatories of the California 
Institute of Technology in Pasadena, Calif. 

Married 

Cynthia Austin to Charles Daniel Dunkin, 
Jr., June 4, 1955, in Binghamton, N. Y. 

Virginia Eason to John Weinmann of New 
Orleans, June 11, 1955, in Oklahoma City. 
Mr. Weinmann is a graduate of Metaire 
Perk Country Day School, New Orleans, 
Tulane University and Tulane College of 
Law. 

Carol McLean to Robert E. Bly, June 24, 
1955, in Duluth, Minn. Elizabeth Ann 
Mitchell was one of the bridal attendants. 
Mr. Bly graduated from Harvard in 1950, 
and is now teaching English at the State 
University of Iowa. 

Susanne Robbins to Bradford Colt deWolf 



of Washington, D. C, May 28, 1955, in 
Peterboro, N. H. Katharine Johnson Robbins 
'46, was matron of honor. 
Born 

To Beverly DeCesare Nassar, a second 
child and first daughter, Nicandra Louise, 
August 26, 1955. 

To Barbara French Brandt, a second child 
and first daughter, Elizabeth, June 20, 1955. 

1948 

Lee Booth Witwer is now living in South- 
ington, Conn., where her husband is working 
as a reporter for the New Haven Register. 
Lee has two daughters, Grace, two and one- 
half, and Sally, one. 

Judy Erdmann spent the summer traveling 
in Europe. She is teaching at the Community 
School this year. 

Mary Rich writes, "I have recently re- 
turned from a wonderful vacation in the 
Caribbean, thanks to the Alcoa Steamship 
Co., Inc., for which I've been a secretary for 
two and one-half years! On May 17 I flew 
with another Alcoa secretary to San Juan, 
Puerto Rico, where we stayed for four days 
prior to boarding an Alcoa chartered Danish 
freighter. We were aboard the Mette Skou for 
one week, calling at eight British Windward 
and Leeward Islands en route to Trinidad 
and then spent another week in Trinidad 




Meredith Keller, daughter of Carolyn 
Teeson Keller '46 



23 



and nearby Tobago, sightseeing, sunning, 
swimming, etc., all along the way. On June 6 
we went aboard the Alcoa Cavalier, a passen- 
ger-cargo ship carrying 50 to 60 cruise 
passengers, for the northbound voyage back 
to the States. June 13 found us arriving in 
Mobile, Alabama, early in the morning and 
flying to New York City late that night, 
having been gone exactly four weeks." 

Hannah Richmond returned in May from 
a seven months tour of Europe. She is now 
working in New York as an editorial assistant 
with Hall Brothers Publications. 
Married 

Fairfield Frank to Arthur Lambert Du- 
Bois of New Canaan, Conn., June 18, 1955, 
in Bronxville, N. Y. Mr. DuBois graduated 
from Deerfield Academy and Colgate. 

Louise Hellier to Anthony Peter Louvis, 
September 10, 1955, in Marion, Mass. 

Eleanor Parker to Paul Swan Cushman of 
Glen Falls, N. Y., September 24, 1955, in 
Andover. Mr. Cushman is a graduate of 
Lowell Technological Institute. 

Ann Sarolea to Alick Nairne Bartholomew 
of Inveresk, Scotland, June 18, 1955, in New 
Canaan, Conn. Mr. Bartholomew is a gradu- 
ate of St. John's College, Cambridge, Eng- 
land and served in the Gordon Highlanders. 
He is with Meiklejohn and Son, Ltd., of 
London. 

Charlotte Stone to George Leopold Wolf, 
June 18, 1955, in Cleveland, Ohio. 

Helen D. Tasche to Cecil Jackson North, 
Jr., of Hewlett, L. L, June 18, 1955, in 
Sheboygan, Wis. Elizabeth Howe Howard 
'48 was one of the attendants. Mr. Jackson 
is an alumnus of Milton Academy and 
Princeton. He is a student at the Harvard 
Graduate School of Business Administration. 

Born 

To Sue Davis Snyder, a daughter, Sue 
Wilds, April 30, 1955. 

To Martha Grimshaw Bivens, a daughter, 
Christina Bivens, August 26, 1955. 

To Patricia Hammond Duffy, a second son, 
Mark Graham, April 17, 1955. Ann's hus- 
band is with the General Electric Company, 
and they are living in Schenectady. She 
would love to hear from any Abbot alumnae 
in the area. 

1949 

Married 
Fredericka M. Brown to Rev. Robert 
Louis Bettinger of Manchester, Conn., July 2, 



1955. Rev. Bettinger, who served with the 
Army in Japan, is an alumnus of Hobart, j 
and graduated from Berkeley Divinity 
School in New Haven, in June. 

Shirley O. Smith to Robert Edward 
Anderson of Hempstead, N. Y., Mav 28, 
1955. 

Born 

To Margaret Black Dintruff, a third child 
and first son, Robert Andrew, August 27, 
1955. 

To Lynn Olney Paglee, a daughter, Susan 
Carol, July 1, 1955, in Rome, Italy. 

To Jane JVoss Bidwell, a son, Christopher 
Frederick, August 15, 1955. 

1950 

Ann Higgins graduated from the Radcliffe 
School of Management Training in June. 

Ann Moser graduated from Ohio State 
University in June. She is teaching the 
fourth grade in Redwood City, Calif., this 
year. 

Married 

Elizabeth Bradley to Charles Joseph 
Hubbard of Stamford, Conn., June 25, 1955. 
Mr. Hubbard received B.S. and M.S. de- 
grees from Harvard. 

Cynthia Faigle to Paul Joseph Quinn, 
October 15, 1955, in Westfield, N. J. 

Nancy Gray to Joseph Newton Sherrill, 
Jr., June 19, 1955, in Urbana, 111. Mr. 
Sherrill is now on active duty with the 
Army, and is stationed at Ft. Devens in 
Ayer, Mass. 

Coralie Huberth to Samuel Sloan, June 
12, 1955, in Chappaqua, N. Y. Mr. Sloan, a 
graduate of Solebury School, New Hope, 
Penna., is a senior at Princeton 

Margaret M. Lurton to Robert Vinton 
Kahle, June 25, 1955, in Elmsford, N. Y. 

Sally Ann Westhaver to Richard Barron 
Kydd of Andover, August 27, 1955, in 
Andover. Mr. Kydd is a graduate of Hun- 
tington Preparatory School and Boston 
University. He is now a third-year student at 
Boston University Law School. 
Born 

To Mary Bixby Lamb, a daughter, Cheryl 
Noyes, December 14, 1954. Mary is living 
in an old Colonial home dated 1790. She 
writes, "We are kept busy fixing it up, and 
taking care of our six and one-half acres of 
land." 

To Jane Gafill Towner, a son, Bruce Mc- 



24 



Martin, April 3, 1955. Jane's husband is 
stationed at Parks Air Force Base as assistant 
Public Relations Officer directly responsible 
to the Base Commander. 

1951 

Joan Barnard graduated from Goucher 
College in June. She majored in Child 
Development and Education. Joan is teach- 
ing the third grade in Sayville, L. I. 

Gwen Barrington graduated from Mount 
Holyoke in June, and is now attending 
Cornell Medical School in New York. She 
spent the summer touring Europe with a 
student group from Mount Holyoke. 

Barbara Daugherty graduated from Wells 
College with a B.A. degree in June. Her 
major was Sociology. She is studying to be a 
medical secretary at the Katharine Gibbs 
Secretarial School in Boston this year. 

Jill Dickson received a B.A. degree from 
Wellesley where she majored in English. 
She is attending secretarial school this year. 

Alice Emmert received an Sc.B. degree 
from Pembroke in June. She is working in 
the laboratory of the Dow Chemical Com- 
pany in Midland, Mich. 

Sylvia Finger is working for the Telephone 
Company in New York. She received her 
B.A. degree from Smith in June, and ma- 
jored in Economics. 

Susan Kimball received a B.A. degree 
from Vassar in June. Her major field of 
interest was Music. She spent the summer 
traveling in Europe with Cora- Alice St. John. 

Frances Lane majored in Bio-chemical 
Sciences at Radcliffe, and received an A.B. 
degree in June. She has an assistantship in 
Bio-chemistry at the University of California 
this year, and is studying part time. 

Lois Ann Lovejoy received an A.B. degree 
from Vassar in June. The degree was con- 
ferred in the Department of Music. She is 
attending the Katharine Gibbs School in 
New York this year. 

Dorothy Massie received an A.B. degree 
in Mathematics from Smith in June. She 
traveled in Europe during the summer. 

Harriette McConnel graduated from 
Connecticut in June. She is teaching Ninth 
Grade English at Sedgwick Junior High 
School in West Hartford, Conn. 

Mimi Nesbit graduated from Northwestern 
in June with a Bachelor of Music degree. 
She majored in Applied Voice. 

Cora-Alice St. John graduated from Mt. 



Holyoke in June with an A.B. in Religion. 
She traveled in Europe this summer with 
Susan Kimball. 

Marjorie Silver received her B.A. degree 
from Wells in May. She majored in English. 
She hopes to work in England this year with 
the English Nickel Company. 

Sylvie Wallace received a B.A. in History 
from Wellesley in June. She spent the sum- 
mer in Europe. 

Penny Whittall received an A.B. degree 
from Wellesley in History in June. She is 
working in Washington, Conn., in the Center 
for Information on America, sending out 
publications to school and college discussion 
groups on pertinent problems in the United 
States. 

Engaged 

Clemency Chase to Cecil Hammond Cog- 
gins of Corona, Calif. Clemency majored in 
Art at Wellesley and received her B.A. de- 
gree in June. She attended Radcliffe Secre- 
tarial School during the summer. Coggins, a 
graduate of Yale, is studying at Harvard 
Medical School. 

Joan Godfrey to James F. Emmert of 
Newton Centre, Mass. Mr. Emmert is a 
graduate of General Motors Institute of 
Technology, Flint, Mich. 

Nancy Mercer to Richard F. Welch, Jr. 
Mr. Welch is a cadet in the Navy Air Force. 
Nancy received a B.S. degree in Education 
from Tufts. She majored in Physical Therapy 
and worked at the Warm Springs Founda- 
tion for Crippled Children in Gonzales, 
Texas, until October 15th. 

Martha Warner to Ensign Daniel C. 
Olson, Jr., U.S.C.G., of Annapolis, Md. 

Married 

Anne Bissell to Theodore Allan Gates, Jr., 
September 8, 1955, in Bethesda, Md. 

Dorothy E. Colburn to David Rice, Sep- 
tember 10, 1955 in Arden, N. C. Dino 
graduated from Vassar in June, and majored 
in Music. Mr. Rice graduated from Exeter 
and Yale. He is now a Second Lieutenant in 
the Marine Corps. 

Lydia Eccles to John Mogan Page of 
Landover, Md., July 30, 1955. Mr. Page is 
a lieutenant in the Air Force. He graduated 
from Virginia Episcopal School, and at- 
tended Dartmouth College. Lydia graduated 
from George Washington University in 
June with a B.A. degree. She majored in 
French Literature. 



25 



Abbie E. Emmons to Donald Wells Pen- 
field of Winnetka, 111., June 19, 1955, in 
Rye Beach, N. H., Sarah Emmons '52 was 
bridesmaid. Mr. Emmons graduated from 
Milbrook Academy and Trinity College. 

Rebecca Fuller to Theodore Dwight 
Sheldon of Los Angeles, August 27, 1955, in 
Beverly Hills, Calif. Mr. Sheldon attended 
Deerfield Academy, and was graduated 
from Laguna Blanca School in Santa Bar- 
bara. He graduated from the California 
Institute of Technology. 

Barbara J. Gibson to Roy William Roth of 
Stamford, Conn., September 3, 1955, in 
Andover. Polly Paradise was the maid of 
honor, and Harriette McConnell was one 
of the bridesmaids. Mr. Roth received his 
B.S. degree from M.I.T., his M.S. degree 
from the University of Michigan, and his 
Ph.D. from M.I.T. 

June Marble to Anthony Ladislav Vydra, 
June 25, 1955. June graduated from the 
University of Vermont with a B.A. degree in 
Psychology. 

Frances Russell to George Lewis Phelps, 
of West Hartford, Conn., July 16, 1955. 
Ellen Chaplin was maid of honor. Frannie 
received her B.S. degree from Tufts and a 
degree in Physical Therapy from Bouve. She 
is now working at the Hartford Hospital. 

Rosamond Reifsnyder to James Knicker- 
bocker Peck, Jr., June 9, 1955. Rozzie 
graduated from Smith in June, cum laude. 
Mr. Peck is an ensign in the Naval Reserve. 
He is a graduate of Tabor Academy and 
Wesleyan University. He is on leave from 
Cornell University Law School. 

Audrey Webster to George John Prevo, 
January 15, 1955. Mr. Prevo graduated from 
Yale School of Fine Arts in 1951 after serving 
for two years in the Army in Korea. He is an 
artist associated with Bray Studios, Inc., 
New York, producers of educational, train- 
ing, and industrial films. 

Ellen Chaplin to Mahmoud Sabet of 
Alexandria, Egypt, September 3, 1955, in 
Cambridge, Mass. Mr. Sabet is studying at 
the Harvard Graduate School. 

Born 

To Connie Hall Strohecker, a son, Benne- 
ville Noyes, Jr., July 16, 1955. 

1952 

Elizabeth Hammons is working as a 
laboratory technician at the Children's 
Hospital in Boston. 



Engaged 

Marilyn Sullivan to James E. Baillie of 
Andover. Mr. Baillie is a graduate of Bow- 
doin College. He is with Dun and Brad- 
street. 

Married 

Helen Neisser to Fernando Modenesi of 
Peru, April 30, 1955, in Evanston, 111. Mr. 
Modenesi is working in Evanston, and Helen 
is continuing her studies at Northwestern. 

Nancy Penwell to William Orvin Hood, 
June 18, 1955, in Andover. Ann Merchant 
'53 was maid of honor, and Constance 
Markert '52 and Anna Stefani '52 were 
bridesmaids. Mr. Hood prepared at the New 
Hampton School, and will graduate in 
December from Babson Institute of Business 
Administration . 

1953 

Bunty Benedict is spending the year study- 
ing at the University of Paris. 

Patty Earhart and Ann Kennedy are 
studying in Grenoble, France, this year. 

Drusilla Flather graduated from Pine 
Manor Junior College in June. 

Muffy Grant, Carol Hardin, and Anne 
Oliver are studying in Switzerland this year. 

Muffie Gross spent the summer in Switzer- 
land, and is studying in Edinburgh for her 
Junior year. 

Martha Horsefield graduated from Colby 
Junior College in June where she majored in 
English. She is attending Katharine Gibbs 
in Boston this year. 

Jane Wilson has transferred to the Univer- 
sity of Michigan. 

Mary Scandura was one of the attendants 
to the May Queen at Simmons College last 
May. 

Engaged 

Doris Schoonmaker to 2nd Lt. Philip 
Augustin Lee Miller of Plandome, N. Y. 
Lt. Miller was graduated from the Collegiate 
School in New York and the University of 
Virginia. 

Married 

Harriet Van Dusen to Ensign Horton 
Sidney Spitzer of Southport, Conn., June 16, 
1955, in Fairfield, Conn. Mr. Spitzer at- 
tended Hotchkiss, and graduated from Yale 
injune. 

1954 

Pat Emery has transferred to Florida 
Southern College. 



26 



Suzanne Fraser has transferred to Boston 
University. 

Elizabeth Hilgenberg spent the summer in 
Kennebunkport, Maine, where she was a 
member of the Arundel Opera Co. She sang 
leading roles in several operas — notably 
Phyllis in Iolanthe, and Olympia in Tales of 
Hoffman. Miss Tingley, who drove over 
several times from her home in Ogunquit, 
reports that she was very proud of her ex- 
pupil. 

Peggy Moore has transferred to the Uni- 
versity of Michigan. 

Pat Sanborn received honorable mention 
in a French government prize competition 



for high achievement in French at Mount 
Holyoke College. 

Mary Woolverton spent the summer in 
Europe under the Experiment in Interna- 
tional Living. 

Married 

Jane S. Munro to Charles William Barrett, 
Jr., of Sarasota, Fla., September 9, 1955, in 
Newton Centre, Mass. Lee Carroll, Linda 
Jones, Mary Weir, and Ann Hunt were 
bridesmaids. Mr. Barrett graduated from 
Hebron Academy, and is a senior at Dart- 
mouth. 



% 



qa 



u fcnaw. 



the whereabouts of any of the alumnae listed below? We are 
unable to locate them, and would appreciate your sending to the 
Alumnae Office any information you may have of their present ad- 
dresses. 

Elsie T. Ashley Aff. 1907 

Grace W. Bowen (Mrs. Arthur L. Collins) Aff. 1940 

Janet E. Hitchcock 1944 

Elizabeth K. Hosford (Mrs. Carroll Wiggin) Aff. 1941 

Ruth Jackson (Mrs. Gerald D. French) 191 7 

Hannah C. Lyman (Mrs. Roland Blenner-Hassett) Aff. 1927 

Ruth Martin (Mrs. Lee J. Guilbeau) Aff. 1941 

Mary Elizabeth Olson (Mrs. Calvin C. Crum) Aff. 1931 

Rosa M. Prado Aff. 1920 

Amelia N. Shields (Mrs. Eduardo Guirola) 1941 

Helen M. Thornburg (Mrs. William W. Bailey) Aff. 1928 



27 



Please Tear Out and Return 

The Executive Board of the Alumnae Association is anxious to know 
when the alumnae prefer to return to Abbot for reunions. The May reunion 
would take place the first weekend in May at the time of Abbot's Birthday. 
The June reunion would take place the last weekend in May or the first 
weekend in June, depending on the date of Abbot's graduation. 

Please indicate your preference on the ballot below, and send to the 
Alumnae Office. 

□ I prefer a May reunion 

□ I prefer a June reunion 



Maiden Name Class 

Married Name 

Address 



28 



Aeiui? 

A/ew4? 

Afewd? 

Please send news items to the Alumnae Office, Abbot Academy, Ando- 
ver, Mass., before January 15, 1956. 



Today's date 

Maiden Name Class 

Married Name 

Address 











Sent by the School to all Abbot Girls 




jAbbot Academy Bulletin 

February, 1956 

Sent by the School to all Abbot Girls 



ABBOT ACADEMY BULLETIN 

Series 23 FEBRUARY, 1956 Issue 2 



1 



Abbot Academy Alumnae Association 

Associate Member of the American Alumni Council 



President 
Miss Irene Atwood 

180 Commonwealth Ave. 
Boston 16, Mass. 

Vice-Presidents 
Mrs. Edmund W. Nutting 
(Mary Howard) 
2 1 Wave Ave. 
Wakefield, Mass. 

Miss Dorothy Taylor 
118 Elgin Street 
Newton Centre 59, Mass. 

Mrs. A. Lawrence Van Wart 
(Betty Weaver) 
160 Melrose Place 
Ridgewood, N. J. 



OFFICERS— 1 954- 1 956 

Clerk 
Mrs. Robert C. Holland 
(Barbara Healey) 
211 Chestnut Street 
Andover, Mass. 

Treasurer 

Mrs. Lawrence D. Bragg, Jr. 
(Mary Dooley) 
Alden Road 
Andover, Mass. 

General Secretary 
Miss C. Jane Sullivan 
97 Knox Street 
Lawrence, Mass. 



Alumnae Trustees 
1951-1957 
Mrs. H. Guyforo Stever 
(Louise Risley) 
16 Edgehill Dr., Belle Haven 
Alexandria, Va. 

1954-1960 
Mrs. Herbert P. Carter 
(Pauline Humeston) 
163 Glenwood Road 
Englewood, N. J. 



BOSTON 

Mrs. John L. Simonds 
(Mary Trafton) 
3 Kennedy Road 
Cambridge 38, Mass. 

CHICAGO 
Mrs. Floyd Shumway 
(Margaret Rabling) 
815 East Deer path 
Lake Forest, Illinois 

CONNECTICUT 

Mrs. Donald Hoggson 
(Gertrude Drummond) 
R.F.D. 
Lakeville, Conn. 



ABBOT CLUB PRESIDENTS 



DETROIT 
Mrs. Howard H. Fitzgerald 
(Jean Craig) 
19091 Bedford Road 
Birmingham, Mich. 

MAINE, EASTERN 
Mrs. John White 
(Margaret O'Leary) 
3 Wilson Park 
Waterville, Maine 



MAINE, WESTERN 
Mrs. Frank N. Wells 
(Louise Houghton) 
32 Ship Channel Road 
South Portland, Maine 



NEW YORK 

President 
Mrs. Lucien R. Tharaud 
(Cynthia James) 
17 East 96th Street 
New York 28, N. Y. 

OHIO, CENTRAL 
Mrs John B. Gager 
(Thelma Mazey) 
228 N. Drexel Avenue 
Columbus 9, Ohio 

OLD COLONY 

Mrs. James T. Cottreli. 
(A. Louise Thompson) 
372 Madison Street 
Fall River, Mass. 



THE EDITORIAL BOARD 

Jane B. Carpenter, 1892, honorary 
Constance Parker Chipman, 1906, honorary 
C.Jane Sullivan, 1931, Editor-in-Chief 
Irene Atwood, 191 8, ex officio 



Published four times yearly, October, February, May, and September, by Abbot Acad- 
emy, Andover, Massachusetts. 

Entered as second class matter December 12, 1933, at the post office at Andover, Mass- 
achusetts, under the act of August 24, 191 2. 



Winter Calendar — 1956 



January 
January 
January 

January 

January 

January 
January 



January 
January 
January 
February 
February 
February 



March 
March 
March 



March 

March 
March 
March 



5 

7 
8 

*5 

20 

21 ■ 
oo - 



27 
29 



February n ■ 

February 12 

February 18 

February 19 ■ 



February 25 

March 2 

March 3 

March 4 



10 

11 

17 



24 
26 

27 



- School re-opened after Christmas Vacation 

- Rosalinde Fuller — Dramatic Interpretations 

- Vespers — The Rev. Raymond Calkins, D.D., Pastor 

Emeritus, First Church in Cambridge 

■ Vespers — The Rev. Dr. Roy L. Minich, First Church in 

Maiden 

- Andover Celebrity Series — The Boston Symphony Wood- 

winds Ensemble 
Morris Barr — Lecture: "Australia Cannot Be Ignored" 
Boston Symphony Concert 
Vespers — The Rev. Robert Metters, D.D., Emmanuel 

Church, Boston 
• Midyear Examinations begin 

■ Vespers — Hymn Singing 
Seniors go to Intervale 

- Seniors return from Intervale 

- Abbot-Exeter Concert and Dance 

- Vespers — The Rev. Kenneth de P. Hughes, S.T.M., St. 

Bartholomew's Episcopal Church, Cambridge 
Open House at George Ezra Abbot Gymnasium 
The Rev. Victor F. Scalise, D.D., Calvary Baptist Church 
Dorothy Minty, Violinist — Recital 
Boston Symphony Concert 
Vespers — The Rev. Frederick M. Meek, D.D., Old South 

Church, Boston 
Louis Untermeyer — Lecture 

- "Candida" — Play with Brooks School 
Senior Prom 

Prom Chapel — The Rev. Vivian T. Pomeroy, D.D., 
Minister Emeritus, The First Parish Church, Milton 

Vespers — Hymn Singing 

Joint Concert and Dance with Brooks School 

Student Recital 

College Entrance Examination Boards 

Reunion for College Students 

Eagle Plume — Lecture: "Indian Lore, Life and Culture" 

Vespers — The Rev. John L. Wallace, The First Congrega- 
tional Church, Wellesley Hills 

Play by the Junior Class 

Gym Exhibit 

School closes for Spring Vacation 



Cover — Dolls for Hindman 




A Dedication and Open House was held February ir, 1956, in the 
George Ezra Abbot Gymnasium. 



These scenes show activities in the Gymnasium, which the students 
have been using since November. 









Abbot Admissions 

I am beginning just now in January to taste the misfortune of meeting 
or hearing of delightful girls who, I am sure, would have made eminently 
successful Abbot girls — and distinguished alumnae. Because their applica- 
tions have come in too late, we cannot consider them, and we are unhappy. 

This decade is a time when the fates are kind to such schools as ours. 
The overcrowding of the public schools (despite the noble and herculean 
efforts that are being made to provide more rooms and more teachers), the 
national prosperity, the generally easy traveling over considerable distances 
— these and other happy circumstances combine to make more people than 
ever more willing and anxious to send their daughters to boarding schools. 
Undoubtedly there will come new or recurrent difficulties. Even now, for 
instance, some people still believe that it is "snobbish" to patronize inde- 
pendent schools. This attitude is being combatted by simple and direct 
public relations. 

In any case we find ourselves with many more applications than va- 
cancies. The first lot of decisions about the girls who are to enter in Septem- 
ber of 1956, was taken in December of 1955. About one-half of the certain 
vacancies were filled then. The rest were acted upon in early January. This 
is earlier than usual, but is more compatible with the practice of other 
schools. Many families with daughters or sons of an age to begin boarding 
school are behaving exactly as do those of college-age children, and are 
applying to several schools at once, to be sure of a place somewhere. Most 
of the colleges notify their candidates simultaneously — on a single fateful 
day of May — and the boarding schools have come as close to that arrange- 
ment as possible by notifying their candidates at the same time — in late 
November or December. 

There are, of course, cases of withdrawals or unsatisfactory end-of-the- 
year reports which leave us with vacancies from time to time during the 
spring or summer. These we fill from the Waiting List or from last-minute 
candidates who by chance turn up at the right time. This accounts for those 
complaints by a parent who indignantly recalls the admission of one of these 
last-minute applicants to a school which had rejected her own daughter a 
month or so before, on the ground that there was no room. 

Regarding the regular process of admissions at Abbot, all applications 
should be received by the end of November of the year preceding the one in 
which the student hopes to enter. While we are delighted to receive them as 
far in advance as parents wish to make them, we do maintain that early 
application is, of course, no guarantee of acceptance. In actual practice it is 
quite true that given two unknown quantities with practically identical 
characters and achievements according to their records, the choice will 



usually fall on the child of the foresighted family, simply because it is a most 
readily measured criterion. 

Another natural point of reference, which will be of particular interest 
to my readers, is the matter of "Abbot connections". I am sure that it will 
be easily seen that no school can be completely self-perpetuating any more 
than can a dynasty. Our application blanks have a large space under the 
question, "Have you any relatives who have attended Abbot Academy? If 
so, please give their names and, if possible, the dates of attendance." Fre- 
quently that space is very well filled indeed. We are delighted to see it so, 
but the matter is treated just as the date of application. Other things being 
equal, the daughter or relative of a former student will probably be accepted 
ahead of an unconnected candidate, but Abbot connections cannot in any 
way make up for a piece of evidence of inadequate ability. 

Fundamentally, in this happy age of a surfeit of candidates, the chief 
consideration is the mind of the applicant. We look primarily at her school 
record, especially her most recent marks, her ability as measured by various 
tests which are administered by most schools in the seventh and eighth grades 
such as the Kuhlman-Anderson Test and the California Mental Maturity 
Test. Beyond these figures or letters the only way of judging whether the girl 
is going to use her mental ability while she is at Abbot is by learning what 
her school principal or counsellor has to say about her habits and character. 

Letters of reference are helpful and useful if they contain some specific 
description of the girl and her behavior. We ask for three, at least, from men 
or women who have known the girl well and have had a good opportunity of 
seeing her in one particular situation or another — with her family, in 
scouting, visiting a friend, baby-sitting. A glowing paean of praise does not 
advance our understanding of the girl very much, and sometimes it is hard 
to recognize in a disturbed, unhappy, or mischievous new girl, the paragon 
that we had been picturing. 

There is no fool-proof recipe for admissions that can be followed by 
hopeful parents nor, I am sure, is there one to be followed by the school 
administration. If every kind of gambling is illegal, we are lawbreakers. Not 
a class passes through the school without its quota of surprises, both dis- 
appointments and successes beyond expectation. To reduce the number of 
the former and multiply the latter, is the aim of all those who are concerned 
with admissions. 



Ouvu HmccTScj Ln.an 



«L_ 



Retrospect in Color 

Sheila Prial, "56, President of Athletic Association 

Every school year at Abbot forms a painting; each event adds a new- 
color or line until, at the end of the year, the canvas is finished. The artists 
are many, the colors, rich in experiences shared, the result, a work of knowl- 
edge gained and warm friendships acquired. 

As a new painting is added to the Abbot gallery each year, there are 
those in school who see their art work with a different perspective. As each 
event is experienced, these artists realize that they will be participating for 
the last time. The Senior Class, an honored institution in any school, can 
only look at each event with mixed emotions. Be it an exciting hockey game 
on field day, or the simple beauty of the Thanksgiving service, or the rich 
tradition of our Christmas dinner, we, as seniors, realize that this is our "last." 
Color scheme in any portrait is important, and thus we shall begin our 
painting by dabbing on a good portion of orange and green. It's field day! 
Loud though these colors may be, they were no match for our voices and 
spirit throughout all the events. Our portrait this year will prove to be unique 
as the games ended in a tie! Gargoyles and Griffins will both agree that it 
was quite a day. 

To temper the colors and add a note of solemnity and beauty we shall 
use white — our Thanksgiving service. Each year the tradition grows in 
meaning; the hymns become more beautiful; the verses express heretofore 
unspoken thoughts. They are no longer "words," but lessons, rich in pur- 
pose, applicable to our own lives. 

Reds, yellows, blues — all the bright colors added as the year pro- 
gresses. The Senior play lends regality to our work, for the play was about 
Queen Victoria. Scenes depicting her life were enacted quite professionally, 
and the costumes and scenery were extremely well executed. Being a Senior 
project, nothing less than the best was expected. We were not disappointed! 
The Senior-Mids added their color with a variety show and showed the 
school that theirs is a talented class! We had entertainment galore, and it 
was truly an evening well spent. 

Almost before we realized it, our Christmas activities had begun. 
Mysteriously shaped packages began to disappear into closets and drawers, 
and overnight many girls developed into expert dressmakers. The reason 
for all this activity was, of course, our dolls. 

Plaids and prints will have to be added to our picture, these as a re- 
minder of the colorful clothes on our Christmas dolls. 

And if it is possible, a brushful of candlelight — this as a remembrance 
of Christmas vespers. The hushed and reverent atmosphere of the chapel, the 
simple truths as expressed in the carols and stories of Christmas — is it 
possible to express all this in a painting? 

As Christmas vacation neared, the days were caught up in a bevy of 
excitement and many rehearsals. The students were not alone in their prepa- 



rations, however, and this was made apparent as Miss Hale beautifully read 
two Christmas stories. The music department most energetically prepared us 
for the approaching celebration, and the teachers of the language department 
tutored us in various songs. 

And finally, the last verse was learned, the last rehearsal held. Our 
brushes are once again dipped into paint — shall we choose red and green 
for the season? I would prefer using blue and white — Abbot colors for the 
tradition of the Christmas service. 

There isn't much that can be written about that service. Rather, it 
will be remembered without any reminder. It was the culmination of weeks 
of preparation, and truly showed us the spirit of the season — "Peace on 
earth, good will towards men!" 

The Prep class very ably showed us that good things come in small 
packages. They presented the traditional St. George and the Dragon, and 
audience reaction couldn't have been better. Bravo, Preps! 

On the last night before vacation we again donned white dresses — 
Christmas dinner and carol-sing. As to the dinner, I'm sure we all had some 
difficulty with our dresses, and not a few girls were seen loosening their belts! 

And then the carol-sing. It is an unusual experience to learn hymns 
other than the standard and popular ones. Our program was varied — yet 
were the songs modern or traditional, the beauty and meaning remained the 
same. And so, with the last notes of the Christmas carols echoing in our ears, 
our good-byes were said. Vacation had finally come, but with it, we found 
that we would be leaving a part of ourselves at Abbot, to be regained when 
we returned. 

Every year at school is unique in some respect for each class. For the 
Preps, it is the newness of everything. The Juniors feel that at last they are 
not the youngest, but still do not have all the responsibilities of the oldest. 
The Senior-Mids are practicing to take the job, as it were, of being Seniors. 
And the Seniors — for them, everything is unique ! The routine becomes 
something different as we realize that this is our "last." Commonplace 
activities, daily work — all this takes on an aura of the exceptional. 

To finish our painting for this first half of the year, we shall have to add 
the one unique thing that all classes have in common. A great splash of 
color is necessary. The colors themselves do not matter — if they are bright, 
they will fuse together and form a warm glow so typical of our feeling of 
pride when we look at and play in our new gymnasium. Even the least 
skeptical had to look on in amazement this fall as the architect's plan so 
quickly became a reality. Move into it in November? Well, a great many 
didn't think it possible, but we did just that. Even now the gym has become 
almost the center of Abbot's extracurricular life. The activities are many, 
the enjoyment, extreme. The gym — wonderful ! 

H | We look now to the second half of our year at school. As it follows its 
course, colors and lines will be added to our painting, some old and familiar, 
some new and unusual. For the class of '56, whatever occurs will be special, 
because this is our year. 

Yes, these are the things we will remember. . . 



Board of Trustees Notes 

One new member was elected to the Board of Trustees in December, 
1955. We present him here with a brief biographical sketch: 




E. Benjamin Redfield, Jr. 
88 Bradlee Avenue 
Swampscott, Mass. 

Special agent of Northwestern Mutual Life In- 
surance Company; past president of Boston Life 
Insurance Trust Council; past vice-president of 
National Agents' Association; president of Lynn 
Hospital; trustee of Lynn Institution for Savings; 
director of Boston Life Insurance Trust Council, 
Boston Life Underwriters, Heart Fund, Inc., 
Lynn Y.M.C.A., Boys' Club of Lynn; chairman 
of Parents' Committee Abbot Gymnasium Fund. 



Abbot Second Century Alumnae Fund 

September 1, 1955— January 31, 1956 

344 alumnae have contributed $4900 
since Sept. 1, 1955 



Our goal is $10,000! 



Mi. fylajf 6xnfi: 



Campus Notes. Fifty years ago few casual visitors were seen on the 
campuses of American schools. Modern-built roads and the automobile have 
provided the comfort and convenience whereby parents and friends "trip to 
Abbot" in a day from quite distant parts. The lovely, historic, natural 
countryside gives satisfaction to many, many members of the Abbot family 
at all seasons of the year. 



A few excerpts from letters recently received from alumnae are inter- 
esting and constructive. 

"Most of our alumnae, I suppose, do not see much of the inside workings 
of Abbot upon an occasional visit. I was amazed with the number of needed 
furniture items which have been given by alumnae and friends for equipment. 
As a girl, I remembered the 'White Room' in Smith Hall was furnished by the 
alumnae in Miss McKeen's day. Now you have the Alumnae Room in Abbey 
House and the 'Nettie Room' in Draper Hall. I was thrilled with the many 
items from clocks, antique chairs, tables, dining equipment, davenports, 
couches, and the beautiful sleigh bed for the Principal's room. And to think 
that the school is soon to receive several pieces of Miss McKeen's furniture 
saved by her heirs for Abbot." 

"I hope that my long and continued interest in Abbot will help her 
accomplishments and be an inspiration to others. I enclose my check for 
% , and only wish it could be for a larger amount." 

"I wish I could endow Abbot with a fund large enough — the income 
from which would pay the salary of one or more members of her faculty — in 
the major departments, particularly English, Mathematics, History, or the 
Sciences." 

"I have an article in my will as a bequest to Abbot. Everyone should 
make a will ! Why not encourage the members of our alumnae family to give 
Abbot a sum which would provide an income equal to the amount they give 
to the school each year." 

"I like to invest my money in the Teacher. No call, as I see it, is so 
clear, and the rewards are nearly always certain. She is the breath and heart 
of a great school. Abbot has had many such. I can testify as an alumna with 
daughter and now granddaughter to gain the rewards of association with 
fine teachers and strong effective teaching." 



Two unrestricted gifts amounting to more than $3,000 were 
received recently from an alumna and former parents. 



8 



The Free Europe Committee 

By Mrs. Jirina Sztacho, Abbot Faculty 

(Mrs. Sztacho formerly worked with the Mid-European Studies Center of 
the Free Europe Committee and published a book called Mid-Europe: A 
Selected Bibliography. This is used as a text-book in American univer- 
sities.) 

During the last few years you have heard about Radio Free Europe, 
or the Crusade for Freedom. I am sure that many of you were interested in 
that, but did not know the exact purpose and significance of these organiza- 
tions. Therefore, I would like to provide you with some information about 
these important institutions. 

Both these organizations are related to the Free Europe Committee, 
Inc., in New York (FEC). Radio Free Europe is one of its branches and the 
Crusade for Freedom is a body organized to make known the purposes of 
the Free Europe Committee to the people of the United States. It solicits 
support with the aid of the American Heritage Foundation. 

FEC is an association of American citizens who, after having realized 
the purpose of all the subversive activities of communists in Europe after the 
end of World War II, believe that the peoples now living behind the 
Iron Curtain are being held captive against their will by the agents of Soviet 
Russia. These nations now living behind the Iron Curtain and called Satel- 
lites are: Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, 
Poland, and Romania. 

The mission of FEC is therefore to work toward helping to free these 
peoples, and to enable them to erect democratic governments and to join 
with the other peoples of Europe in establishing a peaceful, fraternal, and 
cooperative European community. This mission corresponds to the United 
States policy. 

To attain its aim FEC works in different fields. 

The Division of Exile Relations, in close cooperation with associations 
of exiles, helps their work for the restoration of liberty to their homelands. 
According to the best estimates, there are about 15,000,000 exiles, refugees, 
and expellees in Western Europe today. Included in this mass of refugees 
concentrated there in camps and settlements are several hundred thousand 
previous citizens of the captive European states. 

The Free Europe Citizens' Service provides orientation and guidance 
to escapees from communism and gives direct aid to voluntary refugee wel- 
fare organizations. 



Through the Free Europe University in Exile, which was opened in 
Strasbourg in 1951, FEC assists the captive nation refugee students to attend 
professional courses of their choice at the University of Strasbourg. They can 
also live and work together and participate in special seminars on their own 
national histories and cultures. 

The Mid-European Studies Center helps to maintain the intellectual 
traditions and cultural heritage of the peoples of central and eastern Europe, 
and to assist exiles of scholarly competence to continue their work as a part 
of the struggle against communist tyranny. It increased also the fund of 
information available here on this area by vitalizing the learnings and skills 
of exile scholars, and brought an important addition to American knowledge 
of central and eastern Europe and a valuable aid in the struggle to free the 
captive peoples from communism. 

Radio Free Europe and the Free Europe Press are the weapons in the 
battle for men's minds. They both seek to pierce the Iron Curtain with 
messages of moral and practical value taking the fight to the enemy's camp. 
The 29 transmitters of RFE in West Germany and Portugal shatter the iso- 
lation which the Kremlin seeks to impose on the people of Poland, Czecho- 
slovakia, Hungary, Romania and Bulgaria. Its programs compete with 
regime stations for listeners of all segments of the population. Stress is laid on 
the national culture and the immediate day-to-day problems of the captive 
peoples. The most effective weapon in this struggle is the simple truth and 
hard facts, constantly used to expose conditions within the Soviet orbit that 
the communists prefer to hide from the people. The truth is also used to 
spread dissent among the communists themselves, thus disrupting Com- 
munist Party machinery and reducing its power over the people. By 1953 it 
was clear that changes were occurring behind the Iron Curtain. The massive 
Czechoslovakian strike in May and the June riots in East Germany signaled 
the growing power of the people and the waning strength of the communist 
regimes. The people had declared against the "People's Democracies." It 
was at that time that a novel experiment was made in combining with RFE's 
spoken word, the printed work of Free Europe Press. The operation joined 
both these forces in a coordinated psychological warfare weapon. High- 
altitude balloons carrying millions of newspapers and leaflets which cascaded 
down into the target countries of Czechoslovakia, Hungary and Poland were 
launched on the prevailing westerly winds over the Iron Curtain and brought 
the news everywhere, even to peasant villages where no broadcast reception 
is possible. The Free Europe Press publications are coordinated closely with 
Radio Free Europe broadcasts so that both written and spoken word rein- 
force each other. Since May 1, 1954, over 212 million pieces of printed 
matter have been delivered across the Iron Curtain in some 353,000 balloons. 
In the Czech, Slovak, Polish, and Hungarian languages small leaflet news- 
papers have been sent in editions of 2 million every two weeks, with articles 
varying from "London Times comments on conditions in Satellites" to a 
word-for-word transcript of President Eisenhower's press conference on 

10 



Geneva. They regularly bring the news denied to the population by the 
communist regimes. The satellites have consistently tried to shoot down the 
balloons. Squads of police, army, and even school children are employed 
regularly to collect leaflets. 

A letter from Czechoslovakia made a characteristic remark: ". . .The 
balloon action is excellent. Everybody reads the messages. In some workshops 
and factories there is always someone who posts them on the door. They are 
everywhere and no amount of gathering them up helps. ..." 

The mass of people in the satellites being opposed to the communist 
system but unable to communicate with one another need a free press to 
create the solidarity and slogans which will eliminate the isolation of the anti- 
communist individual and give him the encouragement he needs from the 
west in his small but determined effort to resist communism. What they need 
are the facts which the communist cannot afford to give them and the proof 
of western concern for their situation; evidence of the partnership of the 
satellite peoples and the west in the struggle for peace, liberty, and justice. 
This is what the leaflets of the Free Europe Press carry behind the Iron 
Curtain. 

Two official communist protests to the U. S. Government, and more 
than 340 angry Soviet and Satellite press and radio attacks during the first 
year of balloon leaflet operations provide direct evidence of the communist 
vulnerability to this campaign. 

Mr. Whitney H. Shepardson, president of FEC, in his President's report 
for 1954 wrote: "The Free Europe Committee is a political warfare operation 
engaged in a struggle against Soviet Russian colonialism behind the Iron 
Curtain and communist influence this side of the curtain .... It would be 
a mistake to imagine that these efforts are of interest only to the people we 
address. It is true that our activities sustain the morale of those peoples . . . and 
their belief that the Free World is a world worth fighting to rejoin. This is all 
directly in the American interest. It is in our interest that no single power — 
yesterday the Nazis, today the Soviet communists — shall dominate the 
European continent. It is in our interest that the captive peoples shall con- 
tribute as little as possible in manpower and resources to Soviet military 
potential. It is in our interest that the Iron Curtain countries shall feel about 
the presence of Soviet troops and agents among them as . . . (they) felt about 
the Nazi occupation. Finally, it is in our interest culturally and spiritually 
that the captive peoples shall not be perverted by 'Soviet Man' and lost to 
the civilization of which we are jointly the heirs. To contribute to these ends 
by the means here . . . described, is the mission of the Free Europe Committee." 



1 1 




Gymnasium Scenes 




12 



5u fKemoriam 



1883 

Rachel Larrabee died October 30, 1955, 
in Groton, Conn. She was 92 years old. 

1885 

Mary Prince (Mrs. Albert Sauveur) died 
October 9, 1955, in Cambridge, Mass. 

1890 

Jennie Yale (Mrs. Francis W. Robinson) 
died some years ago. 

1894 

Fanny Duren (Mrs. James C. Boyd) died 
September 4, 1955, in Eldora, Iowa. 

1896 

Nellie Louise Campbell died December 
14, 1955, in Danvers, Mass., at the age of 81. 

1897 

Marion B. Morse died January 5, 1956, in 
Newton Highlands. 



1901 

Minnie Foster (Mrs. George C. Campbell) 
died October 22, 1955, in Westboro, Mass. 

1917 

Ruth Jackson (Mrs. Gerald D. French) 
died July 31, 1955, in California, after a 
short illness. 

1920 

Eliza Clark Bailey (Mrs. Frederick F. 
Wright) died October 20, 1955. 

1921 

Ruth Alden Crossman (Mrs. Orville A. 
Houg) died July 30, 1955, in Riverside, 
Calif., after an illness of four months. 

1929 

Louise Tobey (Mrs. Sterling Dean) died 
December 10, 1955, in Tujunga, California. 
Louise had been ill for some time with 
multiple sclerosis. Our sincere sympathy is 
extended to her husband and to her sister. 



Class News 



1887 



'87 reporting for the last months of 1955. 

Angie Dunton Purrington spent a happy 
summer at her girlhood home in Bath, 
Maine, with her brother, Judge Dunton and 
family. In September she returned to Shelby- 
ville, Ky., to be with Doris when school 
opened. Their plan for Christmas was a 
flight to Dallas, Texas, to visit the family. 

Jeanie Jillson continues her activities at 
Pilgrim Place in Claremont, Calif. Some- 
times she is impatient that the advance of the 
years slows her pace. It has not changed her 
interest. She is fortunate that a niece and 
family live in California and visit her. 

And Harriet Thwing — what has she ac- 
complished? She is a little ahead of the other 
two and has had a birthday in 1956. She is 
now beginning year 91. She does not need 
her cane to do the stairs in the homes of a 
grandniece and cousins where she visits. 
Last spring six great-grandnephews paid her 
a tribute that pleased her. Their ages were 
8 to 14. Three of them were visiting in the 
home of the other three where she was a 
visitor. The first night the youngest came 
down the stairs, pajama-clad, shook hands 



and said "Good night, Aunt Harriet!" This 
was not unusual, but, down came the five, 
one by one, with the same salute and went 
upstairs to bed. Perhaps the two mothers 
suggested it, but the boys were smiling and 
happy and so was "Aunt Harriet!" 

Harriet H. Thwing 
Pres., Sec'y., Treas., A.A. '8y 
1901 " 
Our sincere sympathy is extended to 
Evelyn Carter Giles whose husband died 
November 3, 1955, in Woodstock, Vt. 
1909 
While she was on a freighter trip last fall, 
Beulah McCarty Canterbury spent two days 
with Helen Weber Mitchell and her son at 
their villa in Florence. Beulah's grandson is 
at the Kent School. 

1910 
Edith Seccomb Young's name should have 
been included in the list of contributors to 
the Gym Fund in the October Bulletin. 
A9AA 
(A=i) 
An Invitation to Abbot Academy 
Come one, come all, 
And we'll have a "ball," 



13 



Whether we're short or tall. 

As we get older 

And a little bolder, 

We think of our class 

As if it had dash. 

But we were rather tame 

Putting our lessons, first in the game. 

Tempus fugit, 

Bit by bit, 

Let's make a hit 

On the fifth of May '56 

We'll miss those who have gone 

To the Great Beyond, 

But shall think of them above 

With prayers and love. 

Thanks to one who has been our Herald 

Our faithful "Edith" Donald 

We'll not care about the weather 

As long as we are together. 

Come, Come, Come on. 

So we'll say — "C'est si Bon." 

Dora Heys Pym 

1913 

Charlotte Amsden Flint has moved to 
Walpole, N. H. 

Marion Gould Smith writes, "This is my 
ninth year as hostess at the Faculty House at 
Mount Hermon School. In the summer I am 
manager of Malletts Bay Club Inn, a pri- 
vately-owned club on Lake Champlain. My 
son and his family are in Oakland, Calif., 
where he is with the St. Paul Mercury In- 
demnity Co." 

Margaret Wilkins writes, "I am Regent 
of the Pasadena Chapter of the DAR. I saw 
Catherine Vail Atwater in San Francisco 
last February." Margaret saw the Rose 
Bowl Parade with Catherine's daughter. 

1915 

Elizabeth Allen Belknap reports the birth 
of her fifth grandchild and first granddaugh- 
ter, August 30, 1955. 

Mattie Larrabee Whittemore now has 
twelve grandchildren. The twelfth, William 
A. Whittemore, 2nd, was born November 27, 
1955, the third child of her son, Ted, Jr. 

1917 

Miriam Bacon Chellis became a grand- 
mother December 7, when her daughter, 
Caroline, had a son. 

The class extends its sympathy to Irene 
Baush Greene whose mother died recently. 



1919 

We have just learned that Ruth Alley was 
married in August, 1955, to William A. 
Rohrbach. 

Jane Holt Atkinson's son, Robert, was mar- 
ried in July. He is in his final year at Harvard 
Business School. Her son, Theodore, is the 
minister of the King Street Christian Church 
in Danbury, Conn. 

The class will be sorry to learn that Ger- 
aldine Murray Stanton's husband, Col. 
Hubert G. Stanton, died September 15, 
1955, after a brief illness. Her son is a Lieu- 
tenant in the Air Force. 

1920 

Married 

Betty Babb Foxwell to Norwood P. Bev- 
eridge, July 29, 1955. Mr. Beveridge gradu- 
ated from Harvard. 

Jay Pear sail Baker writes, "I have been 
confined to my bed for the past six years with 
multiple sclerosis. My elder daughter, Jane, is 
thirty-two and is married to Louis Derteen, 
Jr. They live in Fort Lauderdale and have a 
two-year-old daughter, Patricia Ann. My 
younger daughter, Mary Louise, is thirty-one 
and is married to Edward Davis. They live 
in Whittier, Calif., and they have two 
children: a son, Edward Robert, eleven 
years, and a daughter, Cheryl Ann, nine 
years. My husband passed away in May, 
1954. In spite of my illness, I am still in good 
spirits and remember the good times I have 
had. God bless you all." 

1921 

Frances Gasser Stover writes, "I am busy 
working at Lord and Taylor's, and doing 
decorating. With both children married I 
had to keep busy. Our son, Kitson, is out of 
the Navy, and living nearby with his wife 
and two-year-old daughter. Our daughter, 
Joan, has a little girl four months old." 

1922 

The class extends its sympathy to Florence 
Phillips Cook whose son, a senior at Dart- 
mouth, died in October from a kidney ail- 
ment. 

1924 

Elizabeth Bragg Mcintosh writes, "We 
moved to Florida a year ago, from Bronx- 
ville, N. Y. My husband is associated with 
Sunrise magazine as manager of the South- 
eastern area. As we travel quite a bit through 
North and South Carolina, Georgia, Ala- 



14 



bama and Florida, I should love hearing 
from any friends who may live in this section. 
Our older son, Duncan, is a second-year 
medical student at the University of Ro- 
chester and is to be married in June. Our 
younger son, Alan, is a freshman at Admiral 
Farragut Academy in St. Petersburg." 

1925 

Dorothy Beeley Marsh is now playing 
violin in the Tucson Symphony Orchestra. 

1926 

Catherine Blunt Pierson's son was married 
last June to Nancy Haas of Fullerton, Penna. 
Her daughter, Nancy, was married in De- 
cember to Walter C. Schneider of Pearl 
River, N. Y. "C.B." writes, "Two in one 
year is enough. One daughter, Adele, 18, 
remains at home. She is attending Ridge- 
wood Secretarial School." 

The class extends its sympathy to Dorothy 
Pease Erickson whose son, John, was killed 
when his bicycle collided with a truck. 

1927 

Our sympathy is extended to Gertrude 
Drummond Hoggson whose husband died 
suddenly last Spring from acute bacterial 
endocarditis. Gertrude was in a serious 
automobile accident last February. She 
writes, "I was run over by a car which went 
directly over my chest. I should have been 
dead according to all the expert medical 
opinion in the country, but I survived with 
33 fractures in my ribs, a punctured lung, 
partially punctured heart, a ruptured kid- 
ney, a fractured skull and left knee, and 
massive internal hemorrhages. I have just 
returned from the hospital where they re- 
moved two of the ribs which refused to heal. 
If I now don't have to have a fusion on my 
knee, which has already been operated on 
twice, I am supposedly repaired." 

Katherine Farlow Hutchinson reports the 
birth of a granddaughter last July. She also 
has a grandson who is two and one-half. 

1929 

Jane Linn Gale's name should have been 
included in the list of contributors published 
in the October Bulletin. 

1930 

The class extends its sympathy to Florence 
Gardner Balius whose mother died December 

25> !955- 

Margery Hart Cory writes, "Our family 



consists of two boys, 12 and 5, and a daugh- 
ter, Suzanne, 9. She saw the cover of the 
Bulletin and wants to go to Abbot and 
stand on the steps, too." Margery's husband 
is a lawyer working with the Army Engi- 
neers on Flood Disaster in the Cambridge, 
Mass., office. 

Elizabeth Perry Lewis writes, "It took me 
25 years to do it, but in December, 1955, I 
finished the requirements for a B.A. degree 
from Mexico City College." 

1931 

Emily Bullock is in Houston, Texas, where 
she is doing secretarial work on an engineer- 
ing project. She had luncheon recently with 
Dorothy Stevenson Russell. Dot's husband is a 
doctor, and she has two daughters. 

The class extends its sympathy to Jane 
Sullivan whose mother died in December. 

Marie Whitehill is working as a Labora- 
tory Technician in the Research Lab at 
IBM in Newburgh, N. Y. 

1933 

Marion Houghton Ronstadt writes that she 
and her family have been living in Mexico 
for 12 years. Her husband is a corporation 
lawyer. Her daughter, Barbara, 1 7, and her 
daughter, Karen, 16, attend the American 
High School in Tlalpan. Her son, Alfredito, 
7, was born in Mexico and says that he is 
"Mexicano hasta las cachas"! Marion 
writes, "We recently moved into our new 
home on the border of what Ben Hogan 
calls one of the four most beautiful golf 
courses in the world. The course is built in 
and around a cedar forest planted by Fran- 
ciscan friars 400 years ago. The snow-capped 
peaks of Ixtaccihuatl and Popocatepetl 
stand out in the background exactly like the 
postal cards every tourist sends home — a 
confectioner's dream. I would love to renew 
acquaintances with traveling classmates 
when they come to Mexico." 

Mariatta Tower is Academic Counsellor 
in the high school in Caldwell, N. J. 

Margo Walker Whittier writes, "My 
husband and I are still trying to get our 
mental feet back on 'terra firma' again, 
after our simple, carefree life cruising the 
Bahamas in our little schooner last winter 
and spring. Actually we were afloat for a 
year and anchored at our home port last 
July. I'm contemplating a book, a sea-going 
companion to Anne Morrow Lindbergh's 



J 5 



Gift from the Sea. The simple life is best — 
people think too much about things. We have 
just moved to the Grapevine Cottage in 
Concord, a charming place which was old 
when the British marched by in 1775. 
Ephraim Bull developed the Concord grape 
here. Part of the old grapevine is still in the 
yard, and my husband wants to get it to 
producing again, only converted to seedless 
Concords." 

Born 
To Betty Weaver Van Wart, a third child 
and second son, Dirk Weaver, October 28, 
1955. Betty's son Peter, is 13, and her daugh- 
ter, Gretchen, is 9. 

1935 

Born 

To Shirley Smith King, a fourth child and 
second daughter, Lydia Rice, November 6, 
1955. Shirley's other children are Toddy, 13, 
Avis, 10, and Jonathan, 7. 

1936 

Lenore Buckley Hurley has two children, 
Priscilla 8, and Vincent 7. She is active in 
community activities, and is president of the 
Fort Worth Pre-School Association. 

Mildred Eastlack Gray is working for the 
city of Norfolk as secretary to the judges of 
the Corporation Court. Her son, Ricky, 
83/3, is in the third grade. 

The class extends its sympathy to Sally 
Scates Phelan whose husband died suddenly 
November 17, 1955. 

1937 

Louise Risley Stever's husband has been 
appointed dean of the School of Engineering 
at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He 
will assume the position in June. He is now 
Chief Scientist of the United States Air Force. 

Born 
To Jane Stevenson Wunsch, a fifth child and 
third daughter, Martha, October 16, 1955. 
Jane's other children are Dick, 15, a student 
at Tabor Academy; Anne, 12, Jim, 9, and 
John, 3. Her husband is practicing Internal 
Medicine in Detroit. 

1938 

Janice Hunter Aitken writes that she is 
enjoying Southern California very much. 
She would love to hear from any Abbot 



girls in the area. Address: 3909 Fifth St., 
Riverside, Calif. 

Born 
To Anne Simpson White, a sixth daughter, 
Judy, December 19, 1955. Pudge writes, 
"We've lived in Madison since April, and 
like it very much, though the harried com- 
muter's life can't touch the peace and quiet 
we were so accustomed to in Syracuse. How- 
ever, there's still no rest for the weary, and 
with six girls to keep track of, there's little 
peace now." 

1939 

Pat Fletcher Horan and her husband have 
booked passage on the S.S. United States for 
next July. They plan to make London their 
headquarters for five weeks and make trips 
to Ireland and the continent. Their children 
will visit Rosa Fletcher Crocker, '38. Pat's 
husband is now co-owner of Johnny Ever's 
Sporting Goods in Albany. Pat would enjoy 
having any Abbot girls stop any time they 
are in Albany. 

Marjorie MacMullen Brewer should have 
been listed as a regular contributor to the 
Fund in the October Bulletin. 

1940 

Born 

To Barbara Brown McKallagat a sixth 
son, January 12, 1956. 

To Joan Carlson Hutchinson, a third 
child and second son, Stuart Alan, May 13, 

*955- 

To Phyllis Crocker England, a third child 
and first son, George Glover, May 26, 1955. 




Stephen and Philip, sons of Mary Howard 
Nutting '40. 



16 




Sue Bates Heath '42, her husband, and 
children, Steven, Susan, and Darwin. 

1941 

Jane Towne Johnston celebrated her tenth 
wedding anniversary with a two-week trip 
to California. 

Born 

To Beverly Brooks Floe, a son, Charles 
Pennell, May 10, 1955. She entertained the 
Boston Abbot Club at her home in October. 

1942 

Ann Taylor Debevoise writes, "We have 
returned to New York for the winter — quite 
a change from a wonderful summer on the 
farm in New Jersey. Two very active young 
lads keep me out in the Park. Other times I 
am very busy with the Children's Aid 
Society." 

Born 

To Irene Abbott MacPherson, a third child 
and second son, George, January 5, 1956. 

To Miriam Douglas Sanner, a third daugh- 
ter, Carol Douglas, June 12, 1955. Ellen, 
Miriam's eldest daughter, is now in kinder- 
garten. 

1943 
Married 

Katherine E. Shaughnessy to Dr. David 
Lambert Bruns, August 27, 1955, in Carmel, 
Calif. 

Born 

To Mary Alice Beckman Huidekoper, a 
fourth child and second son. Henry Shippen, 
April 16, 1955. 

To Bettye Rutherford McCouch, a third 
daughter, Bonnie Jane, September 9, 1955. 

To Jean Schubert Acford, a daughter, Jo- 
anne, December 10, 1955. 

To Isabel Wiggin McDuffie, a second 
daughter, Joan Selden, December 3, 1955. 



1944 

Carol Paradise is teaching Latin and 
Spanish at the Hathaway Brown School in 
Cleveland. 

We have just learned that Paula Savage 
was married in August, 1953. Her married 
name is Williams. She is doing Occupational 
Therapy work in a mental hospital in Ep- 
som, Surrey. She has a fiat in London (9c 
Hogarth Road) and will welcome members 
of the faculty and members of the class of 
1944 who find themselves on her side of the 
Atlantic. 

Born 

To Shirley Rhodes Lowe, a third child and 
second daughter, Deborah Scott, October 
19, J 955- 

1945 

The class extends its sincere sympathy to 
Elizabeth Dickerman Burgher whose husband 
died November 17, 1955, after a long illness. 

Mary Jane Hodges gave a series of travel 
talks in October at the Andover Library. 
The talks were based on pictures taken dur- 
ing her three trips to Europe and a recent 
tour around the world. Mary Jane has been 
associated with book and magazine publish- 
ing in New York for the past four years. She 
is now traveling in Austria and the Nether- 
lands. 

Kitty Mulford is now in San Francisco, 
and has a wonderful job in a book shop 
dealing in old and rare books. 

Hilary Paterson Cleveland is teaching his- 
tory and government at Colby Junior Col- 
lege. 




Clay and Whitney, sons of Ann Taylor 
Debevoise '42. 



17 



Born 

To Josephine Bernardin deVries, a daugh- 
ter, Mary Bernardin, July 21, 1955. 

To Martha Boynton Pawle, a fourth child 
and second girl, Emily MacPherson, July 7, 
1955. Martha's husband is taking a residency 
in general practice at the University of 
Colorado Medical Center until June, 1956. 
He was discharged from the Air Force last 
June. 

To Madge Twomey Keepin, a fifth child 
and third daughter, July 5, 1955. 

1946 

Married 
Nancy Howe to Hans Peter Lieb of Boston, 
December, 1955. Mr. Lieb is formerly of 
Zurich, Switzerland, and is a student at the 
Boston Architectural Center. 

Born 

To Sally North Jones, a third child and 
first daughter, Jennifer, November 4, 1955. 

To Carolyn Teeson Keller, a second daugh- 
ter, Susan, November 23, 1955. 

To Jane Weldon Boland, a son, John J., 
Jr., September 27, 1955. 

1947 

Barbara Goddard Theg's husband is assist- 
ant manager of station WMTV in Madison, 
Wis. 

Married 

Mary Lee Peck Brown to Basil Frederick 
Latrobe-Bateman. After a wedding trip in 
Europe, she will live in Washington. 

Margot Meyer to Harry E. Richter of 
Philadelphia, December 7, 1955, in Pough- 
keepsie, N. Y. Mr. Richter was graduated 
from the William Penn Charter School and 
Haverford College. 





Bruce, Lee, and Gary, children of Barbara 
Haserick Johnson '45. 



Nancy Hamilton Eglee '47, her husband 
and children, Katharine and Charles. 

Born 

To Joanna Campbell Crocker, a third child 
and first son, Richard Weyman, September 
20, 1955. 

To Diane Gould Berkeley, a third child and 
first son, Norborne, III, November 15, 1955. 

To Geraldine Treadway Dampier, twins, a 
son, William Heaton, and a daughter, Kather- 
ine Jeanne, October 4, 1955. Gerry writes, "I 
almost hit a new record — Willy weighed 
6% lbs., Kitty was 8 lbs., but a lady in 
Chicago had two, both over 8 lbs. the week 
before mine arrived!" 

To Christine von Goeben Curtis, a son, Carl 
Gavin, September 29, 1955. Chris writes, 
"Carl was born in the back of an Air Force 
field ambulance at Shirvi Air Base. We were 
completely surprised by the whole thing as 
he was two weeks early. I'll bet I'm the first 
Abbot girl to have her baby in an Air Force 
field ambulance — a very unglamorous spot, 
but adequate." 

1948 

Charlotte Stone Wolf and her husband are 
living in Zurich. They plan to spend three 
years there while George finishes studying 
Veterinary Medicine at the University. 

Engaged 

Beth Dignan to John Bernard McGinty of 
Jamaica Plain, Mass. Mr. McGinty gradu- 
ated from Harvard, and is now a senior at 
Tufts Medical School. 

Genevieve Young will be married Februr 
ary 25, 1956, to Cedric Sun of White Plains, 



18 



\. Y. Shirley Young '51 will he the maid of 
honor, and Frances Young '57 will be a 
bridesmaid. Mr. Sun graduated from Coo- 
perstown Academy and Lafayette College. 
He is working as a Mechanical Engineer at 
Glen Cove, N. Y. 

Born 

To Martha Ball Geiken, a second son, 
Stacy Haines, December 24, 1955. 

To Carolyn England Wansker, a second 
child and first son, Charles Henry, III, 
September 16, 1955. 

1949 

Freddy Brown Bettinger is in Glendive, 
Montana, with her husband who was re- 
cently ordained an Episcopal deacon. She 
writes, "We have been called to serve four 
missions here in towns that spread along the 
eastern part of Montana covering an area 
almost the size of Connecticut." Freddy is 
somewhat wary of the 40 degrees below 
Montana winters. 

Sally Nesbitt Reese's name should have 
been included in the list of subscribers to the 
Fund in the October issue. 
Engaged 

Patricia Bleecker to Edward Sprague 
Jones of Oyster Bay, L. L, N. Y. Mr. Jones 
was graduated from Phillips Andover and 
Princeton. He attended the Art Students 
League in New York. He is an illustrator. 

Born 

To Anne Stevens Bailey, a son, Stephen 
Denham, June 13, 1955. 



1950 

Noelle Blackmer is working at the English 
Speaking Union in Boston. 

Peggy Kitchell Stabler is living in Wilming- 
ton, Del. She has two children, Laird, III, 3, 
and Ramsay, 1. 

Sue Morgan is enrolled in the training 
program at Bloomingdale's in New York. 

Debby Redfield is teaching at the Brooks 
School in Concord, Mass. 

Engaged 

Alice Russell to Robert Lang Happ of 
South Bend, Ind. Mr. Happ is an alumnus of 
Bowdoin College. He did graduate work at 
Harvard and is a member of the Culver 
Military Academy faculty. 



Born 

To Constance Corey Lashbrook, a daugh- 
ter, Coralie, Decembers, 1955. 

To Ann Merriwether Disharoon, a daugh- 
ter, Lee Ann, November 27, 1955. Ann 
writes that her husband will finish his re- 
quirements for his M.B.A. at the Columbia 
Graduate School of Business in June. 

1951 

Barbara Gibson Roth is attending Yale 
taking a Master's degree in Teaching. She is 
practice-teaching French in the fourth grade 
in New Canaan. 

Minola Habsburg took part in a tableau at 
the Bal Blanc held in New York January 12, 
for the benefit of the Russian Charitable 
Organizations of the United States. 

Paula Holden graduated from Smith in 
June, and is now working at Harvard. 

Lyn Hummel is working at the UN in New- 
York as secretary for the Christian Science 
Monitor UN correspondent. 

Marianne Slysz is attending the Cornell 
Nursing School. 

Shelia Swenson is doing graduate work at 
Columbia. 

Ann Taylor is doing graduate work in 
Latin at the Horace H. Rackham School of 
Graduate Studies, University of Michigan. 
Ann received her A.B. degree from Vassar 
last June. She spent last summer in Hawaii. 
Engaged 

Susan B. Kimball to Keith Ward Whee- 
lock of Haverford, Pa. Mr. Wheelock gradu- 
ated from Exeter and Yale. He is teaching 
at the Haverford School and is working 
toward a Master's degree in International 
Relations at the University of Pennsylvania. 
Susie is teaching at the Beard School in 
Orange, N.J. 

Sandra C. Smith to Leonard V. Short, 
Jr., of Lexington. Mr. Short was graduated 
from New Preparatory School and attended 
Kenyon College. He served with the Army 
in the Far East for three years, and is now 
attending Boston University. 

Shirley Young to George Hsieh of New 
York. He is a graduate of Worcester Acad- 
emy and the University of Illinois, and is 
now serving in the Army. 

Married 
Martha D. Warner to Daniel C. Olson, 
Jr., September 17, 1955, in Bridgeport, 
Conn. Sally Mason Crowell was maid of 



19 



honor. Mr. Olson is a graduate of Connecti- 
cut College and is serving with the Coast 
Guard. 

Born 
To Sally Dower Saglio, a son, Stephen 
Dower, May 30, 1955. Sally writes that her 
husband is in his third year at Tufts Medical 
School. 

1952 

The class extends its sympathy to Joan 
Baird whose mother died November 26, 

*955- 

Betsy Garvey has transferred to the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina. 

Karen Larson spent ten weeks last sum- 
mer studying at Mexico City College. She is 
now vice-president of the University of 
Colorado Hiking Club. 

Engaged 
Nancy Faraci to Charles Allan Shionis of 
Boston. Mr. Shionis attended Boston Uni- 
versity School of Business Administration, 
and is employed in the sales department of 
Jordan Marsh Co. 

Married 
Marilyn E. Sullivan to James E. Baillie of 
Andover, October 8, 1955, in Andover. Mr. 
Baillie graduated from Bowdoin, and is a 
lieutenant in the U. S. Army. 

1953 

Carol Burton is studying at the Cornell 
School of Nursing in New York. 

Catalina Gomez is teaching kindergarten 
in Bogota. 

Judith Pinkham is studying at the Kath- 
arine Gibbs School in New York. 

Ruth Sidon is studying at the Katharine 
Gibbs School in Boston. 



Engaged 
Nancy Smedley to Sgt. Donald Berkley 
Bonjonia of Colonial Heights, Va. Mr. Bon- 
jonia is stationed at Altus Air Force Base, 
Altus, Okla. Nancy is a junior at the Uni- 
versity of Colorado where she is majoring in 
Elementary Education. 

Married 
Margit Andersson to Pvt. Timothy Robert 
Clifford of Seattle, Wash., October 22, 1955, 
in Marquand Chapel, Yale University, New 
Haven. Mr. Clifford graduated from Yale 
last June and is now stationed with the Army 
at Fort Knox. 

1954 

Betsy Beeson is studying at Allegheny 
College to be a technician in electro-en- 
cephalography. She spent two weeks in 
Bermuda last summer with Di Cookman. 

Nancy Donnelly has transferred from 
Skidmore to Northwestern. 

Mary Woolverton spent last summer in 
Switzerland. She writes, "I had quite a time 
speaking French, since my Swiss family did 
not speak English." 

Married 
Patricia Stainton to Dale Frederick Rowe 
of New York, N. Y., June 10, 1955, in 
Brattleboro, Vt. Mr. Rowe graduated from 
Goddard College in Plainfield, Vt., and 
received his Master's degree from the Putney 
Graduate School. He is teaching Science in 
Darien, and Pat is going to college in 
Bridgeport, Conn. 

1955 

Eleanor Easton is a member of the Bryn 
Mawr choir. 

Caroline Howes is studying at Simmons. 



Club News 

Boston 

The Boston Abbot Club held its winter meeting January 21, at the 
College Club in Boston. Mrs. Jirina Sztacho of the Abbot faculty discussed 
the work of the Free Europe Committee. 

The annual luncheon will be held March 17, and Mrs. Crane will be 
the guest speaker. 



20 



Ate you SlifLftituj,? 



Don't let your slip show on our records. 
Send us news. 

Please send news items to the Alumnae Office, Abbot Academy, An- 
dover, Mass., before April 15, 1956. 



Today's date 

Maiden Name Class. . . . 

Married Name 

Address . 

Postal Zone 



ALUMNAE DAY 

MAY 5, 1956 



Results of the balloting indicate that a large majority 
of alumnae prefer the May reunion date. 



Save this date for your Abbot Reunion. 







Abbot Academy Bulletin 

I May, 1956 



ABBOT ACADEMY BULLETIN 



Series 23 



MAY, 1956 



Issue I 



Abbot Academy Alumnae Association 

Member of the American Alumni Council 



President 

Mrs. Edmund W. Nutting 
(Mary Howard) 
21 Wave Ave. 
Wakefield, Mass. 

Vice-Presidents 
Miss Nancy Harrison 
333 Longwood Ave. 
Boston, Mass. 

Miss Dorothy Taylor 
118 Elgin Street 
Newton Centre 59, Mass. 

Mrs. James F. Mathias 
(Barbara Lord) 
Glendale Road 
Harrison, N. Y. 



OFFI GERS— 1 956- 1 958 

Clerk 
Mrs. Robert C. Holland 
(Barbara Healey) 
211 Chestnut Street 
Andover, Mass. 

Treasurer 
Mrs. Lawrence D. Bragg, Jr. 
(Mary Dooley) 
Alden Road 
Andover, Mass. 

General Secretary 

Miss C. Jane Sullivan 
97 Knox Street 
Lawrence, Mass. 



ABBOT CLUB PRESIDENTS 



Alumnae Trustees 
1951-1957 
Mrs. H. Guyford Stever 
(Louise Risley) 
16 Edgehill Dr., Belle Haven 
Alexandria, Va. 



1954-1960 

Mrs. Herbert P. Carter 
(Pauline Humeston) 
163 Glenwood Road 
Englewood, N. J. 



BOSTON 

Mrs. John L. Simonds 
(Mary Trafton) 
3 Kennedy Road 
Cambridge 38, Mass. 



DETROIT 
Mrs. Howard H. Fitzgerald 
(Jean Craig) 
19091 Bedford Road 
Birmingham, Mich. 



NEW YORK 
Mrs. Michael Dreyfuss 
(Jane Philbin) 
253 East 77th Street 
New York 21, N. Y. 



CHICAGO 

Mrs. Floyd Shumway 
(Margaret Rabling) 
815 East Deerpath 
Lake Forest, Illinois 



MAINE, EASTERN 

Mrs. John White 

(Margaret O'Leary) 
3 Wilson Park 
Waterville, Maine 



OHIO, CENTRAL 
Mrs. John B. Gager 
(Thelma Mazey) 
228 N. Drexel Avenue 
Columbus 9, Ohio 



CONNECTICUT 
Mrs. Donald Hoggson 
(Gertrude Druminond) 
R.F.D. 
Lakeville, Conn. 



MAINE, WESTERN 

Mrs. Frank N. Wells 
(Louise Houghton) 
32 Ship Channel Road 
South Portland, Maine 



OLD COLONY 
Mrs. James T. Cottrell 
(A. Louise Thompson) 
372 Madison Street 
Fall River, Mass. 



THE EDITORIAL BOARD 

Jane B. Carpenter, 1892, honorary 
Constance Parker Chipman, 1906, honorary 
C. Jane Sullivan, 1931, Editor-in-Chief 
Mary Howard Nutting, 1940, ex officio 



Published four times yearly, October, February, May, and September, by Abbot Acad- ; 
emy, Andover, Massachusetts. 

Entered as second class matter December 12, 1933, at the post office at Andover. Mass- 
achusetts, under the act of August 24, 191 2. 



Spring Calendar — 1956 



April 
April 

April 
April 



April 



10 
13 

14 
J 5 



April 2 1 



22 



April 
May 


29 
4 


May 
May 


5 
6 


May 
May 


13 
19 


May 
May 
May 


20 
26 

27 



■3 1 



School re-opened after Spring vacation 

Celebrity Series at Phillips Academy — Andres Segovia, 
Guitarist 

Gwendolyn Belle, Contralto — Recital 

Vespers — The Reverend Rollin Fairbanks, D.D., Episcopal 
Theological School, Cambridge 

Parents' Week End 

Dinner speaker — The Reverend A. Graham Baldwin, D.D., 
Phillips Academy 

Abbot-Phillips joint performance of "Trial by Jury" 

Morning chapel for parents and their daughters — The Rev- 
erend Herbert Gezork, D.D., President, Andover-Newton 
Theological School 

Boston Symphony Concert 

Performance of the Metropolitan Opera Company in Boston — 
"La Boheme" 

Vespers — Music by the Choir 

Alumnae Week End 

Student Recital 

Bazaar 

The Reverend Edward W. Meury, B.D., First Congregation- 
al Church, Keene 

Abbot Christian Association Vespers 

CEEB for Senior Mids 

Joint Concert and Dance with Brooks School at Abbot 

Vespers 

Field Day 

Vespers — The Reverend Sidney Lovett, D.D., Chaplain, 
Yale University 

Final Examinations 

Student Government Chapel at 8:45 a.m. 

Rally Night 

Last Chapel at 9:30 a.m. 

Garden Party 4:00-6:00 

Commencement Play 

Baccalaureate at 10:45 a - m - Baccalaureate Sermon — The 
Reverend Wallace Woodsome Robbins, S.T.D., Presi- 
dent, the Meadville Theological School 

Supper at 6:00 p.m. 

Concert at 7:30 

Commencement at 10:00 a.m. Commencement address — The 
Reverend Robert Russell Wicks, D.D., Dean of the Uni- 
versity Chapel, Emeritus, Princeton 





Miss Alice C. Jenkins, 
1886, who celebrated the 
seventieth anniversary of 
her graduation from 
Abbot May 5, 1956. The 
president of the class of 
1956 presented Miss Jen- 
kins witn a nosegay at 
the Annual Meeting. 



Where They Go and Why 

Alice C. Sweeney, 191 4 
Director of Studies 

Hardly a girl enters Abbot now who is not interested in the possibility of 
becoming prepared to enter a major college. Fifty years ago, this was not so; 
in the class of 1 905, less than half of the seniors graduated were in the college 
preparatory department; twenty-five years ago, twenty-eight out of a class of 
forty-eight were listed as entering four-year colleges; in the class which 
graduated last year, all but ten of the total fifty-eight went to major colleges, 
and of those ten, eight entered junior colleges, several in the college transfer 
group, thus signifying their intention to continue their studies for four years. 
The trend is a natural one, reflecting the greatly increased belief on the part 
of the general public that a college education is likely to be of as much ad- 
vantage for a woman as it is for a man. 

It is natural, too, that girls who have had their training in a New Eng- 
land school, should, for the most part, seek to continue their education in 
New England colleges, because many of those colleges are the largest and the 
oldest and are therefore the most well-known. But the day is past when for the 
average candidate it is simply a matter of deciding whether she will go to 
Smith or to Mount Holyoke, to Vassar or to Wellesley, as the day is past 
when registering at all four will secure her future. The rapidly mounting tide 
of well-trained candidates who are being graduated yearly from high schools 
as well as from preparatory schools is greatly in excess of the number which 
the colleges can admit, and if a candidate is to be successful in winning ad- 
mission to colleges such as those mentioned above she must not only have a 
satisfactory record but she should also be able to speak with some conviction 
when questioned about the reasons for her choice. 

It has been our policy here at Abbot to encourage a student to apply at 
whatever college seems really to represent that girl's ideal goal, but we usually 
advise her to make application at several colleges and to vary her selection in 
such a way that if the original plan begins to seem unrealistic in the light of 
the student's achievements in her studies by the time she reaches her senior 
year, she may feel that some other provision for her future education has been 
made which may in the end turn out to be more suitable for her. Further- 
more, we urge a girl to register at not more than three colleges and to give 
careful thought to her reasons for each plan. 

Occasionally we have a student who knows, when she enters Abbot, 
what college she wants to go to, who abides by her choice up to her senior 
year, who registers at only that college and goes to it upon graduation, but 
such instances are comparatively rare. Usually a girl swings back and forth 
between half a dozen different plans as she comes up through school. It is not 
much help for a girl to have her parents take too much initiative in the mat- 
ter. If a student has been registered at one or more colleges early, before she 






has even entered secondary school, she usually begins to feel that such choices 
are her parents', not hers, and she evolves some fresh plan of her own. The 
system which seems to work best is for parents and girls alike to give thought 
to the matter of choosing a college, when a girl is entering her senior middle 
year, and to work out together a plan based on the reading of catalogues or 
the visiting of colleges, during the vacations of that year. In most instances, 
as it should be, the thinking and the final choice of the girls is very much 
colored by the advice or encouragement of their parents. I recall two sisters 
who once explained to me that their parents were leaving wholly to them the 
decision about where they should get their college education, "But," they 
said, comfortably, "really, they've been influencing us all our lives!" 

As a girl comes close to her senior year and realizes that she must commit 
herself to some plan, she goes through a period of doubt and discussion which 
frequently is very difficult. There is rarely any doubt about wanting to go to 
college, that large conception is fixed, but which one ! The slightest implica- 
tion that there might be something lacking in a college may make the anxious 
candidate feel uncertain about the wisdom of her plans. The reasons expressed 
against going to certain colleges are many and various but they can operate, 
and over and again I have been told such things as that "Wheaton is too 
small"; "Smith is too large"; "Vassar has no college spirit"; "Wellesley is a 
marriage mart"; "Mount Holyoke is too inaccessible," etc. On the other 
hand, the reasons which can appeal to a girl and make her feel certain of her 
choice are frequently as remote. A girl who has made her plans very carefully, 
read catalogues, visited campuses, may return from Christmas vacation 
wholly convinced that she has entirely overlooked the one college to which 
she should go, because her partners at the Christmas dances have assured her 
that such is the fact. As another instance of the results of chance encounter I 
recall the experience of a girl who once planned to use her week end visiting 
in turn the two colleges in which she felt very much interested. Quite by 
chance she shared a seat on the train with a student who was enrolled in still 
a third college, and that student talked so enthusiastically of the kind of 
courses which she was offered and of the stimulation of the work which she 
was doing that the senior in question returned from her week end convinced 
that she should go to the stranger's college, and she did. But the majority of 
girls make their college plans for reasons which are more familiar: they have 
visited colleges or they have talked with recent graduates and friends, and 
thus they have been able to supplement the information given in catalogues 
with the kind of personal impression which inspires in them interest or con- 
fidence. 

The majority of our seniors are successful in winning admission to the 
colleges of their first choice. The majority of our graduates seem satisfied by 
their choices after they had reached college, and they do good work while 
they are there. A tabulation of the distribution of our graduates in the past 
four years shows that the largest groups, ranging in number from twenty-two 
to eight, are in the following colleges, in the order named: Wellesley, Smith, 
Connecticut, Mount Holyoke, Vassar, Wheaton, Northwestern, Radcliffe. 



Students have gone regularly also, though in smaller numbers, in the. past 
four years to Hollins, Skidmore, Bryn Mawr, Cornell, Simmons, Middlcbury. 
Beyond these there are many other colleges in which Abbot is represented, 
though possibly by only a single graduate. 

Much as we feel satisfied by our representation in the larger and more 
well-known colleges, we are also very much interested in increasing the distri- 
bution of our graduates among the colleges which are further afield. We 
draw our student body from many different schools and many different parts 
of the country; for that reason it seems both appropriate and desirable to 
foster an increasingly varied and wide distribution of our graduates. 



Abbot's Urgent Need — Scholarships 

Abbot now has 44 trust funds in various principal amounts restricted, to 
scholarships. These are producing a net annual income of close to $48.50 per 
$1000 of principal. 

Abbot's present capacity to provide sufficient scholarships is very inade- 
quate: 

(a) There are alumnae who are anxious to register their daughters and 
cannot do so. 

(b) There are parents who are suffering reverses due to sudden shrink- 
age of a father's earning power. Their children should be processed 
forward in the educational program. 

(c) Sacrifices are often experienced by thrifty mothers and fathers due 
to an unexpected reduction in their "living income." Their children 
need a "helpful lift." 

(d) The gradual rise in living costs for those parents who have more 
than two children or have a modest professional income find their 
efforts to "give the best" to their children almost stymied. 

One can make gifts by cash or gifts in securities or gifts by will — which- 
ever method may be most feasible to use under the individual circumstances. 

The government pays a large portion of your gift to Abbot. When you 
make a gift your federal income tax is reduced by a substantial amount. If 
you contribute securities in which you have a present market value profit over 
the original cost, the government contributes even more than you. So, a gift 
to Abbot in marketable securities often avoids a capital gains tax. 

Many people are today building up substantial memorial scholarships 
by adding a sum to the principal each year. Just write the Treasurer's office 
at Abbot and it will at once advise you the simple steps to take to make any 
of these options or plans effective. 

Burton S. Flagg, Treasurer 



I 




*»■!■! .m*mM*m*m*i imm 



A Moving Occasion 



UNVEILING OF THE BAS-RELIEF PORTRAIT OF GEORGE EZRA ABBOT 

FEBRUARY 11, 1956 

Six hundred and forty-one alumnae, friends, trustees, and guests in 
addition to Abbot's immediate campus membership entered the new gym for 
a "first glimpse." Many came from distant states. Our oldest alumna present 
was Miss Annah J. Kimball of Concord, N. H., a member of the class of 
1884 — 72 years out. The faculty, forty strong, ranged themselves on the 
main staircase leading from the entrance lobby to the main gymnasium on 
the second floor while Mrs. Alexander Crane, our principal, with Miss 
Hearsey at her left stood beneath the plaque soon to be unveiled. Many 
planned to spend the week end in Andover. Officials of Town, Phillips Acad- 
emy, Public Schools, and Churches were noted in attendance. 

Mrs. Crane prefaced the unveiling with an informal greeting as follows: 
"This is indeed a happy occasion. It is, also, an instance of reversed procedure 
in which a newcomer introduces someone who is familiar and dear to you all. 
It is wholly appropriate that at the dedication of this building, a person who 
has from the beginning followed the vision of the new Abbot Gymnasium 
and has been most active in accomplishing the goal, should be the one to 
unveil the portrait of the distinguished man in whose memory the building 
has been erected, Miss Marguerite Hearsey." 

Miss Hearsey responded: "It is a great pleasure to be here today with my 
friends, and the friends of Abbot Academy and friends of George Abbot, and 
I am honored to have been asked to say a few words at this significant and 
stirring moment. 

"This building for which the class of 1953 contributed the first gift — 
seven hundred dollars — as an act of faith stands here now completed — 



beautiful and functional in the best sense of the term. It is the fulfillment of a 
need, but before this came the dream. 

"It is especially suitable that this building should be a memorial to 
George Abbot, not only because he was a devoted and most capable member 
of our Board of Trustees and for some years its President, not because he was 
an uncommonly skillful athlete himself and believed in the importance of 
sports as part of the good life, but more especially because he was one in 
whom the concept of an ideal and the will to approach it practically were 
happily interrelated. 

"It would have delighted George to share with the students their dream 
which at first seemed fantastic, and to have put practical and patient endeav- 
or into the realization of the dream. The realization has come in this splendid 
building and it is sad for us who knew and loved George Abbot that he is not 
with us today, but we feel it appropriate, as I have said, and deeply gratifying 
that this building is here dedicated to his memory. 

"Before I unveil the plaque I know that I will speak for us all when I 
pay tribute to Radford Abbot whose tireless daily devotion to every detail 
in the creating of this gymnasium has brought it to this perfection. For him it 
has indeed been a labor of love, and he is following his brother in his unselfish 
service to the school in his membership on the Board of Trustees. 

"The friends whose very large gifts made the building possible at this 
time rather than five or ten or fifteen years from now were impelled by their 
affection and admiration for George Abbot and it is, I am sure, a great satis- 
faction to them today, as it is to us all, to have here at the entrance of the 
building a bas-relief which will perpetuate his name, his character and his 
service to Abbot Academy. 

"And may I add a few words of sincerest gratitude to the artist to whose 
generosity we are indebted for the modeling of the head. When he heard of 
the plan for this memorial building Dr. Paul Adrian Brodeur thought of the 
idea of having this portrait bas-relief in the building and offered to make it in 
appreciation of what the school had done for his daughter. Dr. Brodeur never 
knew George Abbot, never saw him, in fact, but I think when you see the 
portrait you will feel that he has conceived and executed a remarkably true 
likeness and a beautiful work of art. We are deeply indebted to the sculptor, 
Paul Adrian Brodeur. 

"It is with continuing gratitude to George Abbot and happy memories 
of him as our friend and the friend of this school in which we all have a warm 
interest that I unveil this memorial portrait." 

Our George Ezra Abbot Gymnasium is made of brick which harmonizes 
in color with the 1829 brick of Abbot Hall; it provides facilities for indoor 
sports for more than 200 students. The main floor is 90 feet long and 45 feet 
in width. It is spanned by laminated wooden arches pressed from southern 
pine in Wisconsin. Ground was broken for the building on May 7, 1955, de- 
tails of which with illustrations reached our alumnae in last Bulletin. Con- 
struction by the Edmund J. Rappoli Company was begun immediately. 
The building was finished on schedule at the end of November. 



Annual Meeting of Alumnae Association 

SECRETARY'S REPORT 

The Abbot Academy Alumnae Association held its annual meeting, May 
5, at 10:45 a - m - m tne Chapel. Miss Irene Atwood called the meeting to 
order, and welcomed the 1 75 alumnae. 

The sixty-two members of the Senior class marched in singing their class 
song. Mrs. Crane presented the class. Miss Atwood welcomed them as new 
members of the association, and introduced the alumnae relatives in the class. 
The list follows: 

Grace Callahan — sister of Judith Callahan, 1958. 

Margo deCholnoky — sister of Panna deCholnoky, 1954; cousin of 
Cora- Alice St. John, 1951 , and Cornelia St. John, 1954. 

Elizabeth Edmonds — sister of Ellen Edmonds, 1957. 

Joan Glidden — sister of Helen Glidden, 1953. 

Deborah Holbrook — sister of Penelope Holbrook, 1957; niece of Cyn- 
thia Holbrook Sumner, 1937; cousin of Augusta Swazey Gardner, Aff. 1884. 

Cecily Kemper — granddaughter of Rosamond Thomson Pratt, 1903, 
and Mercer Mason Kemper, 1902; great-granddaughter of Abby Locke 
Thomson, 1869; great-grandniece of Clara Locke Thomsen, 1872, Sarah 
Thomson Tomes, 1874, and Marian Locke Morrison, 1882; grandniece of 
Eleanor Thomson Castle, 1896, Clara Thomson Knox, 1902, Anne Mason 
Gregory, 1903, and Ruth Mason Dunlop, 1905; cousin of Rosamond Castle 
Olivetti, 1930, and Abby Castle, 1931 . 

Marjorie Moore — granddaughter of Martha Hart Moore, 1889; niece 
of Barbara Moore Pease, 191 2. 

Margaret Oliver — sister of Anne Oliver, 1953. 

Leslia Pelton — cousin of Sophronia Vibberts Conlin, 1937. 

Sheila Prial — sister of Paula Prial, 1954. 

Carol Reed — daughter of Katharine Damon Reed, 1934; niece of 
Patricia Damon Niswander, 1944. 

Nancy Smith — sister of Sandra V. Smith, 1952. 

Sue Sullivan — relative of Frances Nolde, 1954. 

Gail Titcomb — niece of Agnes Titcomb Henderson, 1 92 1 . 

Anne Twombly — daughter of Barbara Nelson Twombly, 1925. 

Betsey Louise White — daughter of Charlotte Hudson White, 1923; 
sister of Mary Lo White, 1947; cousin of Suzanne Martin, 1953. 

Anne Woolverton — cousin of Jane Woolverton, 1941 . 

The president of the Senior class presented a nosegay to Miss Alice 
Jenkins, 1886, who was celebrating her seventieth reunion. They sang salutes 
to Mrs. Crane, Miss Atwood, the alumnae, and the 50- and 25-year classes. 

The following reports were read and accepted: Clerk, Barbara Healey 
Holland, 1930; Treasurer, Mary Dooley Bragg, 1936; Auditor, Frances Flagg 
Sanborn, 1926; General Secretary, Jane Sullivan, 1 93 1 . 

Miss Sullivan read the list of alumnae whose deaths had been reported 
during the year. 

8 



Mary Howard Nutting, chairman of the Alumnae Fund, presented a 
graphic report on the progress of the Alumnae Fund. Nineteen percent of the 
alumnae have contributed to date. 

Miss Sullivan reported that the Dix plan of reunions is being considered, 
and will be explained and voted upon next year. 

Miss Atwood introduced Miss Alice Jenkins, 1886, and Miss Jane Car- 
penter, 1892. Constance Parker Chipman, 1906, and Betty Dix Goddard, 
1 93 1, gave reports of the 50th and 25th reunion classes. 

Mrs. Crane greeted the alumnae, and expressed her appreciation of 
Abbot's loyal alumnae group. 

Janice Lenane Scott, 1942, chairman, reported for the nominating com- 
mittee whose other members were Ruth Baker Johnson, 1930, and Elaine 
Dalrymple Borowski, 1940. The following candidates were presented: Presi- 
dent, Mary Howard Nutting, 1940; first vice-president, Nancy Harrison, 
1940; second vice-president, Dorothy Taylor, 1908; third vice-president, 
Barbara Lord Mathias, 1930; clerk, Barbara Healey Holland, 1930; treasurer, 
Mary Dooley Bragg, 1936. These officers were declared elected. 

A rising vote of appreciation was given to Miss Atwood before she turned 
the meeting over to the new president, Mary Howard Nutting, 1940. 

The meeting adjourned to inspect the new Gymnasium. 

C. Jane Sullivan, General Secretary 

TREASURER'S REPORT 1955- 1956 

May 6, 1955 Balance in Andover National Bank Si 035. 09 

Receipts 
Interest from Invested Funds 
Legacy to Alumnae Association from Lillian Cutter Porter, 1887 

Total 

Disbursements 
Expenses of Alumnae Day, 1 955 
Alumnae Gift to Gymnasium Fund 
Senior Party 

American Alumni Council Dues 
President's Council Dues 
Smith Alumnae Quarterly 
Mrs. Crane's Discretionary Fund 
Travel Expenses to Presidents' Council Meetings 
Eagle Tribune Co. — Fund Appeals 
Class Fund Mailing Expenses 

Boston Abbot Club Postage — Luncheon Invitations 
Alumnae Board Luncheon 

Total 

Balance in Andover National Bank May 1, 1956 

Mary Dooley Bragg, Treasurer 
I have examined the accounts and found the balance to be correct. 

Frances Flagg Sanborn, Auditor 



406 


70 


320 


25 


$1762 


04 


$ 196 


00 


250 


00 


7 


5° 


45 


00 


10 


00 


2 


00 


100 


00 


147 


33 


122 


00 


J 35 


63 


8 


98 


12 


50 


$1036 


94 


% 725 


. 10 



Reunion Groups 




1896 

Left to right: Edith Magee, Dorothy Carr, 1921, Class Baby, and Helen Marland Bradbury. • 




1906 
Left to right: Helen Jones Bliss, Rena Porter Hastings, Mollie Jordan Goodrich, Persis Mackin- 
tire Carr, Maud Sprague, Evaline Korn Cookman, Ruth Adams Downer, Elsie Weissbrod 
Payne, Louise Houghton Wells, Agnes Slocum Biscoe, Constance Parker Chipman, and 
Helen Ellis Rice. 



IO 




Back row, left to right: Dorothy Bigelow Arms and Ruth Miles Thompson. 

Front row, left to right: Marion Brown, Jessie Wightman Jones, Edith Johnson Donald, Henrietta 

Wiest Zaner, Dora Heys Pym, Margaret Copeland, Rebecca Mewton Weedon, Ethel Swain 

Smith, Marion Bemis Schlesinger, and Anna Boynton Hemenway. 




1916 

Back row, left to right: Eugenia Parker, Josephine Walker Woodman, Louise King Childs, 
Mildred Jenkins Dalrymple, Esther Van Dervoort Howe, and Esther Kilton. 

Front row, left to right: Emma Stohn Larrabee, Elsa Wade Holbrook, Charlotte Eaton, Dorothy 
Higgins Rand, Katharine Odell Randall, Eleanor Frary Rogers. 



I I 




1921 
Back row, left to right: Agnes Titcomb Henderson, Dorothy Martin Buracker, Marion Kimball 

Bigelow, Louise Van Dervoort Sweet, Helen Norpell Price, and Dorothy Carr. 
Front row, left to right: Margaret Ailing Ward, Mildred Peabody, Helen Bruno Clegg, and Alice 

Hallett Bradley. 




1926 
Back row, left to right: Alice Perry, Olive Rogers Smith, Katharine Clay Sawyer, Frances Flagg 

Sanborn, and Priscilla Perkins Leach. 
Front row, left to right: Jane R. Hovey, Edith Ireland W/ood, Ruth Deadman McLennan, Virginia 

Spear Houghton, and Elinor Mahoney Smith. 



12 




193* 

Back row, left to right: Mary Angus, Lisette Micoleau Tillinghast, Marcia Rudd Keil, Dorothy 
Hunt Bassett, Katherine Allen Babson, Mary Bacon, Jane Sullivan, and Mary Henderson 
Lee. 

Front row, left to right: Betty Dix Goddard, Peggy O'Leary White, Nancy Can Holmes, Doris 
Allen Carroll, Faith Chipman Parker, Gertrud Van Peursem Bell, and Carol Grosuenor Myers. 



.■»«•». ^.^ . VjK. _>~2s~w-« w — ■* 




1936 

Left to right: Anne Russell Loring, Sally Scates Phelan, Polly Spear Chapin, Mary Dooley Bragg, 
Mary Trafton Simonds, Eleanor Wells Nudd, Anne Dodge Green, Mary Swan, Patricia 
Smith Magee, Elizabeth Sargent Crandell, and Lucy Hawkes Lamson. 



*3 




194* 



Left to right: Frances Troub Roberts, Miriam Scammon Ladd, Susan Woodman McSherry. Nancy 
Whither Atkinson, and Emily Mills Courtice. ' 




Left to right: Mavis Twomey Cox, Ellen Brumback, Marian Troub Friedman, and Louise Doyle 



14 




J95 1 
Back row, left to right: Nancy Bentley Ridings, Susanne Batchelder, Frances Russell Phelps, 

Merilyn Teasdale Abbott, Harriette McConnel, and Polly Paradise. 
Front row, left to right: Marianne Slysz, Sally Dower Saglio, Patricia Driscoll, and Paula Holden. 



Abbot Second Century Alumnae Fund 

653 Alumnae Have Contributed $8500.36 

Since September 1, 1955 

Have you? 

Our fiscal year ends June 30. Every gift, large or small, brings us closer 
to our goal of total alumnae participation. It is not too late to help. The final 
results will be printed in the October Bulletin, and names of all contributors 
will be listed. 



l 5 



3n iJlemnnam 



1878 



1900 



Florence Sawn died April 8, 1956, in 
Portland, Maine, at the age of 98. 

1886 

Caroline Louise Dodge died June 9, 1954, 
in Ogunquit, Maine. 

Emily Thompson (Mrs. J. Parke Hood) 
died March 20, 1953, at the home of her son 
in Pottsville, Pa. 

1893 

Mary D. Coy died August 7, 1955, in 
Libertyville, III. 

Caroline Tuthill (Mrs. Harris E. Starr) 
died in May, 1 954, in New Haven, Conn. 

1896 

Harriet Dockrill (Mrs. Edward L. Ben- 
nett) died suddenly March 12, 1956, in 
Winchester, Mass. 

1897 

Emily Willett (Mrs. Harold Rowlands) 
died October 13, 1955. 

1898 

Alice Gertrude Dennison died in Belmont, 
Mass., August 8, 1954. 

Susie Skinner (Mrs. Robert B. Raymond) 
died February 1, 1956, in Carmel, Calif. 

1899 

Marie Hershey (Mrs. Charles K. Bliss) 
died February 3, 1956, at her home in 
Bellevue, Wash. 

Frances Southgate (Mrs. Robert B. Clark) 
died January 23, 1956, in Enfield, N. H. She 
is survived by her husband and four children. 



Mabel Tubman (Mrs. Carl H. Taylor) 
died April 1 1, 1956, in New York. 

1901 

Katharine Clark (Mrs. David H. Canfield) 
died February 16, 1956, in Carmel, Calif. 
She is survived by a son and a daughter. 

1902 

Tirzah Hall died March 4, 1956, at her 
home in Jamestown, N. Y. She had been ill 
for many months. Our sympathy is extended 
to her brother and sister. 

1904 

Clara Deppen (Mrs. Edward J. Ayars) 
died April 9, 1956, in Hillside, N.J. 

1917 

Dorothy Small (Mrs. Oliver D. Westcott) 
died January 21, 1956, in Englewood, 
Florida, after an illness of two weeks. 

1924 

Alice Hobart (Mrs. Edmunds L. Whitney) 
died unexpectedly April 8, 1956. 

1938 

Patricia Hotchkiss (Mrs. Frederick H. 
Phelps) died suddenly of a heart attack July 
2 9> x 955? at tne home of her parents in 
Granby, Conn. 

1940 

Anne Schoepflin (Mrs. Charles G. Ryder) 
died January 14, 1956, in Hartsdale, N. Y. 
Anne was stricken with polio three years ago. 
She leaves two sons, Charles, Jr., and David. 



Club News 

Boston 

The joint meeting of the Boston Abbot Club and the Alumnae Associa- 
tion was held March 17, at the Smith House in Cambridge. Despite a very 
heavy spring blizzard, thirty-five members managed to get there successfully. 
Mrs. Crane presented an interesting account of school life in her first year as 
principal. 

Connecticut 

A fall meeting is planned, so watch your mail, and plan to attend. 

Eastern Maine 

The club is planning its annual meeting on the second Tuesday in July. 

New York 

The annual meeting was held April 7, at the Belmont-Plaza. Luncheon 
was served by the board members. Mrs. Crane brought news of the school. 

16 



Class News 



1874 

Kate Tilden of Keene, N. H., passed her 
ioist birthday quietly and happily. She en- 
joyed talking about Abbot with her neighbor, 
Josephine Rounsevel Coffin, 1892. 

1879 

F. Adelaide Weeks celebrated her one 
hundredth birthday on January 17. A party 
was given for her at the Vineyard Haven 
Rest Home where she lives. 

1886 

Jennie Lanphear Buck has been ill for a 
year, suffering with facial neuralgia. 

Lucia Trevitt Auryansen writes, "Mine has 
been a very fortunate old age, and at about 
93, I am looking forward to a long summer 
in a community of young people. I have a 
small private school for young boys as a near 
neighbor. The friendship with these young 
people and their children, and a very happy 
intimacy with the boys of the school whose 
uninhibited affection for 'Aunt Lucia' is 
very sweet to me, has helped to keep me 
feeling young. The annual trip to The Lan- 
tern, my Mont Vernon, N. H., home, is all 
the traveling I want to do. This is the 
second year I have had to give up my hikes 
with the boys, but they are with me a good 
deal. The care of my garden and the village 
interests give me much to enjoy in my sunset 
years." 

1887 

"Greetings to Abbot from Jean Jillson '87 
and best wishes and congratulations for the 
fine new gymnasium. 

"I have been asked for news. You all 
know 'A garden is a lovesome thing.' Mine 
surely is — my first sweet pea came January 
2nd and the flowers have given me joy ever 
since, with carnations, pansies and daisies. 
We have had a wonderful winter and spring, 
so much sunshine and days of sixty to eighty 
degrees. 

"For our group reading we went to 
Australia and its beginnings and now are 
with Jean Bowie Shor in her 'After You, 
Marco Polo', intensely interesting, es- 
pecially to those of us who have lived in the 
Mid East. And this group is refreshing the 
minds with Anthony Trollope's books. 

"As for service, knitting keeps us busy — 
for the Red Cross and the Seaman's Service 



Union in New York. Also, helping in our 
Rest Home as hostesses in visiting hours is 
a privilege. 

"We have a beautiful new church and 
many opportunities for service. God is very 
good to us and life is full. 

"This is the word from one who will be 89 
the 19th of April." Jean Jillson 

Claremont, Calif. 

This summer Angie Dunton Purrington is 
planning another visit to her old home in 
Bath, Maine. She is an enthusiastic traveller 
by air plane. She will be with her brother, 
Judge Dunton, and family. Last summer she 
wrote that never before had she realized how 
beautifully the City of Bath is located with 
the lovely dunes in all directions. After the 
summer days on the coast of Maine, she re- 
turned to Shelbyville, Ky., to be with 
daughter Doris, the teacher. They fly to 
Texas for the winter vacation to be with 
other members of the family. While Doris 
teaches, Angie is the home-keeper; also, she 
receives and answers letters, many of them 
from friends who knew daughter Hilda and 
son Harold. 

Recently a doctor asked Harriet Thwing 
if she had always lived in Cleveland. "Oh 
no! I came over in the Mayflower. I am 
from the State of Maine!" "That accounts 
for the way you talk!" 

And now, something from our later gener- 
ations. Marion Prall, daughter of our 
Jeanie Carter Prall, of Boonton, N. J., 
writes of the little girl from France who 
joined her Day School last year. She came to 
a strange place with strange people and 
knew no English. If Marion's mother had 
been living, her French would have been a 
great help to the teachers and the little 
pupil. After a few weeks she seemed to 
understand everything and spoke English 
remarkably well. She adjusted herself to new 
conditions and made no fuss when her 
Daddy left her at the school. 

Hazel Rcot Brill of Slaterville Springs, 
N. Y., daughter of our Anna Bronson Root, 
sends a picture of granddaughter Beth Ann 
Brampton, 3^ years, "posed in a dress her 
grandfather wore as a small boy." A bright- 
eyed, laughing little lady. Hazel writes — 
"My husband and I love our new status as 
grandparents." Hazel's niece, Georgia West- 



17 



ervelt, received a Master's Degree in Social 
Work at Western Reserve University and is 
now doing group social work at Alta Social 
Settlement, Cleveland. Hazel knows '87 only 
thru her mother, our class letter and a visit 
to Abbot for one reunion. She is "convinced 
that written from a human and personal 
angle, all their stories would make wonderful 
reading for anyone!" Perhaps! A friend who 
belongs to A. A. '32 writes, "All hail the 
Three of '87 with your precious memories!" 
Harriet H. Thwing 
Pres., Sery., Treas., A. A. '#7 

1891 

Henrietta Hanfnrd Boyd writes that she is a 
"spry aged person" nearing 87, and drives 
her Chevrolet, does club work, archaeology, 
and pioneer history. She lives in Saguache, 
Colo., with her eldest daughter, Marjorie, 
who is a retired school teacher. 

Anna Wells Bigelow writes that her inter- 
est in Abbot has never waned. She has made 
her home in Wilton, Conn., since 1929 — 
having been a commuter to her work as 
Executive Secretary of the New York City 
Mission Society for fifteen of those com- 
muting years. 

1896 

The following letters were received for the 
"paper reunion": 

"My activities have been in my home 
town. I was elected Town Treasurer for the 
thirty-fifth time at the March Town Meeting 
of Rye, N. H. I have been treasurer of the 
school district of Rye for some length of 
years, and one of the trustees of the Trust 
Funds of the town of Rye. 

"With club and church events I have 
kept busy in various ways. Owing to a slight 
injury to an ankle, I have been staying at 
home so far this year." Agnes M. Brown 

"In 1 91 2 I completed the nursing course 
at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, having spent 
the years after leaving Abbot as a teacher in 
schools in South Lincoln, Massachusetts, and 
Marshfield Hills. 

"In 191 3 I went to Changelia, China, in 
charge of the 'Yale in China' Hospital and 
Supervisor of the Women's Training School. 

"In 1915 I returned to the United States 
and in 19 16 married Dr. George F. Powers, 
Clinical Associate in Pediatrics in the Johns 
Hopkins University and Medical Director of 
the Babies' Milk Fund Association of Balti- 
more. 



"In 1 92 1 we moved to New Haven, Conn., 
where we have lived continuously except for 
six months m Detroit, where my husband was 
Pediatrician-in-Chief at the Henry Ford 
Hospital. Except for this interlude my 
husband has been continuously associated 
with Yale University. In 1927 he became 
Professor of Pediatrics in the Medical School 
and Professor Emeritus in 1952. 

"We have one son, Ross Farnsworth 
Powers, who lives in Denver, and two lovely 
grandchildren — a girl born in 1952 and a 
boy born in 1953. 

"For the past eighteen years I have col- 
lected and decorated tole and now have 
over 350 pieces. Based on this collection my 
niece, Miss Olive Floyd, of South Lincoln, 
Mass., and I have prepared a book on 
'Early English and American Decorated 
Tinware' to be published in November 1956 
by the Pond-Elsberg Company of Spring- 
field, Massachusetts. 

"Very sincerely yours," 

Beatrice Farnsworth Powers 
"Dear Girls of '96, 

"Let's just tell these young things that 
sixty years is not so much if the years have 
been lived to the full. 

"I live with my daughter Dorothy, Abbot 
1 92 1, in a high elevator apartment in Cam- 
bridge, where we look to Harvard towers on 
one side and the Boston skyline on the other. 
Having always lived in a large family home, 
our small domain seems like doll-house 
keeping. But it is fun, for marketing and 
cooking these days is full of surprises. 

"I read a good deal and work at my loom. 
It is interesting to choose colors and yarns, 
plan designs and get it all set up in logical 
order. 




Carolyn Mathews Mohn '96 



18 



"I am well and we can go easily and fre- 
quently to Boston and Cambridge shops and 
theatres. 

"Love to you all." 

Lillian Franklin Carr 

"As May is here my thoughts turn back to 
the pages of time sixty years ago when with 
the graduating class at Abbot I received my 
diploma at the South Church. 

"Then came my decision to be a teacher. 
My course in Kindergarten prepared me for 
work with the little folks. I continued prima- 
ry grades until I retired. 

"Now my time is occupied in various 
ways with a game of Canasta with a group 
once a week. 

"I am living in Maine with my niece who 
is also an A. A. graduate. Times change, but 
the spirit of Abbot is always with the 
D.O.G's." 

Florence B. Holt 
Dear Girls of '96: 

"It will be interesting to hear from you all, 
through the Bulletin, but wish I might 
really see you. 

"Home has always been my chief joy in 
life and that is where I am now — in the old 
family home where I was born. I have 
recently had it done over to fit all my 
family. My son Loring and his wife, daughter 
Anne and Loring, Jr., my sister and my 
daughter. 

"It is a busy family and they bring me 
much to interest me, which I enjoy for I 
have not been able for the last few years to 
lead my usual active life. 

"The excitement of the moment is Anne's 
engagement to Walter Gamble of Milton 
and their wedding here in June. Walter has 
another year at the Medical School at the 
University of Penn. and Anne is Assistant in 
Research at the same University so they will 
go back to their work. 

"When I think of Commencement at 
Abbot, I always have the lovely picture of 
'96 dressed in our long, crisp white dresses 
and parasols forming in the Circle to go down 
to church and have cherished it, so pass on 
the memory with my love." 

Ruth Loring Conant 

"I think we all realize how very young we 
were sixty years ago, and I am sure we are 
now not sitting in arm-chairs endlessly 
rocking. Travels, club life and family 
interests are absorbing. Our memories of 
Abbot when we were being brought up and 








May Young Duffy '96 

educated (tho it is after all only life that 
brings wisdom) are always with us! 

"Personally I feel it was sheer luck that I 
spent four very happy and rewarding years 
at Abbot. Certainly we were all very earnest 
about those years, and, I suppose, had 
little knowledge that life ahead would bring 
joys and vicissitudes in abundance. 

"With my love to any of our dear ninety- 
sixers who do come, and affectionate greet- 
ings to Abbot and its old friends." 

Carolyn Mathews Mohn 
"My dear Classmates: 

"What a lovely occasion this is for us all! 
I wish I might be with you, but I will be 
there in spirit and am glad to join the 
'paper reunion'. 

"During these sixty years, which have 
passed so quickly, I have had much happi- 
ness, and still enjoy the advantages that our 
town and lovely country afford us. And 
best of all, my son and grandson are near 
neighbors to me. 

"I shall look forward to reading about you 
all and our sixtieth reunion. 

"With love." 

Grace Pearson Preston 

"It is difficult to believe we have a sixtieth 
reunion, and it would be most interesting to 
be there. On account of very high blood 
pressure, I am leading a very quiet life. 

"Michigan is very cold during the winter 
months, so I look for something more cheer- 
ful soon. After 12 years at Palm Beach, the 
doctor suggested a drier, inland place, and 
as we had friends at Mt. Dara, Fla., we went 
there. Mr. Duffy passed away in 1953. After 
living with a fine man for 53 years, it is 



19 



extremely lonely. I have two sons, and their 
interesting families, seven grandchildren, 
and four great-grandchildren. You can 
picture me during the summer, up at my 
cottage at the Beach Club with all of the 
above coming and going — to get them all 
in takes a bit of planning. 

"With all best wishes to the 1896 mem- 
bers." 

May Young Duffy 

Helen Marland Bradbury spent three 
months in Clearwater, Fla., and visited with 
Jessie Corbin Bates frequently. 

1900 

Mary Carleton is at her same New York 
address, 45 Park Avenue. 

At a coffee one morning in February, 
given for Abbot alumnae in the Newtons, 
Grace Chapman Spear and Bernice Babb 
Brown met for the first time since leaving 
Abbot. Bernice's home for many years has 
been in Newton Highlands. She is now a 
widow and spends much time with her son 
and his family in Virginia. 

Leslie Crawford Hun reports that her 
oldest grandson is with the Army in Japan. 
She has granddaughters at Wheaton College 
and at Goucher in Baltimore. 

Constance Gutterson Taylor writes that she 
is still living in California at Santa Barbara 
and carrying on her work. Both of her sons 
live in California and she enjoys their 
families and her five grandchildren. 

Mary Morgan Norwood is now established 
in the Marylander Apartments in Baltimore 
living alone, she writes, for the first time in 
her life. 

In the recent death of Mabel Tubman 
Taylor on April nth, we have lost a loyal and 
beloved classmate. Her home was in New 
York and in Wellfieet, Mass., in the summer. 
She was active in the New York Abbot Club 
and was Registrar of the New York Colony 
of New England Women. She had no chil- 
dren and is survived only by her husband, 
Mr. Carl H. Taylor, and will be greatly 
missed by many devoted friends. 

These notes were contributed by Grace 
Chapman Spear. 

1901 

The Class of 1901, in 55th reunion con- 
vening, are pleased to report four members 
present in person and nine in thought, as 
expressed by letter or telegram. Our view of 
the new gymnasium was most enjoyable, and 



all expressed their pleasure that it had be- 
come a reality. Before our 60th is at hand, 
the Class would be happy to have the 
Bulletin suggest some modest piece of 
additional equipment to serve as oar next 
reunion gift. 

The class extends its sympathy to Ethel 
Fraser Putney whose husband died recently. 

1902 

Ruth Danenhower Wilson's son, Sloan, of 
the University of Buffalo, is the author of 
"The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit", a 
current best-seller. In the foreword he 
acknowledges his indebtedness to his mother, 
who, he says, proved that she is among 
other things a good editor. 

1904 




The grandchildren of Julia Wallace Gage '04 

Julia Wallace Gage writes that her chief 
pride is her four grandchildren who live 
with their parents on Long Island. She lives 
in the home she built when she was married 
in 1 91 5, and has spent the past eighteen 
summers at her camp on the top of a high 
hill in Greenfield, N. H. 

1906 

The Class of 1906 celebrated a most happy 
successful 50th Reunion, with all ten mem- 
bers present. Two non-grads, and two 
members of 1907 were with us at the 
Luncheon. A welcome guest was our honor- 
ary member, Mrs. Agnes Slocum Biscoe, who 
was assistant to Miss Means. At the luncheon 
a surprise birthday cake was passed by- 
Helen Ellis Rice's granddaughter, Sandra 
Wiles, a student in the school. Mrs. Crane 
joined us at lunch giving everyone a brief 
opportunity to know her better. At the 
Annual Meeting we reported a total of 
twenty-four children, and fifty-four grand- 



20 



children! All the alumnae rejoiced in the 
beautiful Gymnasium, and the outstanding 
progress of the school. Miss Hearsey once 
said, "A school is not good because it is old 
— it is old because it is good!" and Abbot 
grows better each year. 

Those present were: Ruth Adams Downer, 
Helen Ellis Rice, E valine Korn Cookman, 
Helen Jones Bliss, Mollie Jordan Goodrich, 
Persis Mackintire Carr, Gonstance Parker 
Chipman, Rena Porter Hastings, Maud 
Sprague, Elsie Weiss brod Payne. Non-grads 
were Alice Barbour Merrill and Louise 
Houghton Wells. Class of 1907, Marjory Bond 
Crowley and Alice Webster Brush. 

Constance Parker Chipman 
Reunion Chairman 
1908 

Mary Howell had a tea for the alumnae in 
the Richmond area in March. 

Esther Stickney Alley writes, "During 1955, 
I enjoyed my second visit to Brazil, this time 
to Rio de Janeiro instead of Sao Paulo. I 
returned by plane stopping at Lima, Peru, 
Ecuador, Panama City, and Havana." 

1909 

Louise Norpell Meek writes that her son, 
Lt. James W. Meek, who is stationed with 
the Berlin Command, was at Cortina for the 
Olympic Games. 

Cora Soule Robinson is retiring in June 
after forty years of teaching. Her last teach- 
ing position was at the Shipley School in 
Bryn Mawr, where Margaret B. Speer, 
Abbot 191 8, is principal. 

1910 

Ruth Murray Moore reports the birth of 
her third granddaughter, Jane Winslow 
Hersey. 

Emily Silsby Morgan enjoyed several weeks 
in Tucson, Ariz., in February. She came 
home via the southern route and stayed a 
few days in New Orleans. 

1911 

A delightful Reunion, Saturday, May 5th. 
Bright skies but cool. Alumnae meeting- 
most interesting in Abbot Hall 10:30 a. m. 

Mrs. Crane won us all over with her 
address and charm. Only the 50th and 25th 



reunion classes gave reports — a new and 
good ruling. Delicious luncheon at school in 
Draper Hall, as guests of Abbot. Bazaar by 
students on lawn at "Circle" 2:30. 

There were 12 of us back, but 11 of 191 1 
had dinner at "Fieldstones": our class 
Reunion. Edith Johnson Donald, Chairman, 
Henrietta Wiest Zaner, Ethel Swain Smith, 
Jessie Wightman Jones, Margaret Copeland, 
Rebecca Newton Weedon, Dorothy Bigelow 
Arms, Ruth JViles Thompson, Anna Boynton 
Hemenway, Marion Bemis Schlesinger, and 
Dora Heys Pym. 

Edith Johnson Donald was gracious to let 
us relax, have a class meeting, and change 
into fresh costumes at her home. All the 
class looked well, and have weathered life 
all these years so we would know each one, 
if met anywhere in our travels. We thank 
our Herald, Edith Johnson Donald, for all her 
faithful duties. 

Marion Bemis Schlesinger came Friday to 
Topsfield to Dora's, to attend the "Junior 
Aid Society's" Annual May show for 
charity in Lynn, in which Dora's daughter 
Constance had a role. 

Also there was Mr. Benjamin Redfield, 
new member of Abbot's Board of Trustees, 
who impressed it on Marion and Dora to 
visit the new Gymnasium at Abbot, Satur- 
day. It is a most magnificent building. 
Girls can enjoy ping pong, lacrosse, fencing, 
as well as the regular sports we had, and it's 
a grand place for dancing. 

Abbot is growing. More girls will be 
enrolled for September. There are about 206 
students now, and no doubt the gymnasium 
will be quite a lure. 

We all enjoyed ourselves. We are sorry for 
you of 191 1 who did not come. Will you 
come in 5 years for a Reunion?? 

Dora Heys Pym 

Edith Johnson Donald writes, "Greetings 
from your Class Fund Secretary to you all. 
I do love to hear from you at all times. 
Please keep your letters coming. There are 
four little words which help our Fund and 
our school so much — Enclosed please find 
check. Thank you for all your generous help." 

Dorothy Bigelow Arms leaves for Belgium 
in June. She was in Paris last fall, and also 



A class of 191 1 anonymous gift of $4499 for unrestricted endowment 
was received in March. 



21 



visited Italy and Spain. Her husband has 
been acting as consulting engineer for a 
large French wire-manufacturing company. 

Anna Boynton Hemenway has one grand- 
daughter and one grandson. She is regional 
director of the State Federation of Garden 
Clubs of N. H. 

Marion Brown is Dean of girls at Law- 
rence High School. 

Margaret Copeland came down from 
Maine to hear interesting tales of her friends. 

Rhoda Green has just returned from a 7- 
week trip to California. 

Mary Hall Lewis sends best to all the girls. 
Her husband had a bad heart attack in 
February, but is coming along very well now. 

Dora Heys Pym keeps active at home 
where her daughter, husband and two 
little girls, 4 and 8, live with her. She mo- 
tored to Detroit for Thanksgiving. She has 
nine granddaughters. 

Borgild Hqff Lyman sailed for Europe in 
April for a four-months' tour. 

Miriam Howard Bushnell plans to come 
East in June for her husband's 45th reunion 
at Yale. She is going to Maine this summer 
for a family reunion. 

Rebecca Newton Weedon flew to Europe 
May 11. 

Ruth Miles Thompson attended the Garden 
Symposium in Williamsburg this spring. 

Frances Pray could not attend the reunion 
because of a bad allergy. She has retired 
from her hospital position in Laconia, and is 
teaching music to the young people in the 
neighborhood. 

Henrietta Wiest Zaner and her husband 
came to the reunion from York, Pa. They 
are traveling in the "good old U.S.A." She 
has eleven grandchildren who keep her busy. 
Jessie Wightman Jones and Ethel Swain 
Smith came to the reunion together. Ethel 
has been in Arizona and Florida recently. 

Corinne Willard Dresser's husband has 
been very ill. She returned from Florida in 
April. 

These class notes were contributed by 
Edith Johnson Donald. 

1913 

Helen Danforth Prudden spent a month 
with Margaret Wilkins this past winter. 

Olga Erickson Tucker writes that her son, 
Maj. Tucker, is stationed in Korea with the 
U.S.A.F. Her daughter, Shirley, is married 
and living in Birmingham, Mich. Shirley 



has one daughter. Edna Francis Levitt and 
her husband visited Olga at her summer 
home in Holderness, N. H., last summer. 

1914 

The class extends its sympathy to Laura 
Marland, whose mother passed away in 
Andover on May 4th. 

Harriet Bowman Meeker's husband has 
retired this year, their children are all 
married, and the Meekers are planning a 
trip to Europe this summer, visiting seven 
countries on the Continent. 

Helen Hamblet Dyer's son, Theodore G. 
Dyer, was married on July 21st to Miss Ruth 
Berglund, another graduate of the Uni- 
versity of Maine. 

Helen Hanscom Winslow's husband has 
retired and the Winslows have moved from 
Ohio to Cape Cod. 

Gladys Higgins wrote a charming letter 
describing happy days in her Rockport 
apartment overlooking the water. 

Emma Holt Garside reports the arrival of 
her first granddaughter, Jane Nancy Brad- 
bury; the score is now 5 to 1 — this being the 
first little girl in the families of her son and 
daughter. This past year, Emma visited with 
Elsie Whipple's daughter in California. 

Margaret Wylie Ware has been visiting her 
brother in Ann Arbor, Michigan, and plans 
to come East to Hingham in June. We hope 
she will be able to visit Abbot at long last. 

1915 

Marion Barnard Cole writes that her son, 
Donald, and his wife had their third son, 
January 25, 1956. Donald is teaching history 
at Exeter. 

Muriel Baker Wood writes, "Since be- 
coming Public Relations Director and Al- 
umnae Secretary at Garland Junior College, 
I appreciate the importance of non-skid 
alumnae. Fellow alumnae, do you know 
that sometimes your Secretary must send 
out four (and I have no doubt more) letters 
in order to relocate you? Of course it would 
be much simpler if, once located, you would 
refuse to move. Pick a spot and stay there!" 
A good suggestion, Muriel. (Editor.) 

Betty Leach, who is teaching in Hawaii 
this year, writes, "Yes, Hawaii is a spot of 
great beauty, and my stay here is proving 
very interesting. Except for two Caucasians, 
my pupils are Orientals and Hawaiians. 
Quite a time I had with their names at first, 



22 



but I have mastered them now. Have a 
pleasant 1956. Aloha." She has interested 
her students at McKinley High School in 
Honolulu in the Wayside Inn. They have 
sent their nickels to help the restoration of 
the famous old inn. 

Jessie Nye Blodgett writes that the year 
just passed brought her three new grand- 
children, making a grand total of nine. She 
writes, "Maybe I'm prejudiced, but I think 
they are most interesting and attractive. I 
hope some, among the six little girls, may be 
Abbot girls." 

1916 

Emma Stohn Larrabee writes that she has 
four grandsons, two of whom were born last 
year. 

1917 

Harriet Murdoch Andersson writes: "Our 
son, Ted, was an exchange student from 
Yale in the University of Heidelberg, 1954-55. 
There he met Ellen Krog, a student from 
Denmark, and married her at her parents' 
home last August. My husband and I could 
not be there, but Margit, who spent the 
summer traveling with Ted, was at the 
wedding. My husband is on leave from Yale, 
and began his new job as Associate Director 
of the Foreign Language Program of the 
Modern Language Association of America 
in New York last September. Next year he 
will become Director of the Foreign Lan- 
guage Program. His great interests are in 
getting modern foreign languages introduced 
into the elementary schools, and in im- 
proving the teaching of foreign languages 
everywhere. 

"My daughter, Margit, was married to 
Timothy Clifford of Seattle, Wash., Oct. 22, 
1955. Dr. Sidney Lovett performed the 
ceremony." 

Harriet Balfe Nalle reports that she has a 
granddaughter, who was born Feb. 26, 1955, 
and is the daughter of Harriet's son, Thomas, 
who is permanently in the service flying Jet 
interceptors. 

1918 

Martha Grace Miller Reese's son, Gilbert, 
was named man of the year by the Newark, 
Ohio, Chamber of Commerce. 



1919 

Thelma Mazey Gager and her husband 
spent six weeks in Jamaica at a picturesque 
old plantation outside the town of Tryall. 

1920 

Edna Dixon Mansur writes that her son, 
Warren, Jr., graduated from Dartmouth 
last June and received his commission in 
Army Ordnance R.O.T.C. Her youngest 
son, Bill, graduated from Bowdoin College, 
and is now at Boston University teaching 
part-time and getting his master's degree. 
He plans to enter Vermont Medical College 
next September. 

The class extends its sympathy to Helen 
Donald Coupe whose father died in March. 

Constance Ling writes, "If any of 1920 
remember how I loved Miss Adams' 'Rhyth- 
mic Expression', they may be interested to 
know that I went into a similar (but better) 
type of work and taught it in private schools, 
including Abbot. Uncertain health and my 
growing interest in Anthroposophical work 
caused me to drop it. But now I am stronger 
than ever and again teaching 'Rhythms' in 
our Nursery School. For fifteen years I have 
lived in my own house at Threefold, a center 
of the Rudolf Steiner work near Spring 
Valley, New York. This is my address and 
anyone interested in Anthroposophy should 
get in touch with me. Betsey Hawkes Miller, 
who lives on Long Island, and I frequently 
visit back and forth." 

1921 

1 92 1 reports 10 members present. Louise 
Van Dervoort Sweet came from the greatest 
distance — Kansas City, and Helen Norpell 
Price from almost as far — Chicago. Marga- 
ret Ailing Ward came from New York, and 
the rest were from New England. 

We had a wonderful day and missed all 
the rest of our class. We are more enthusi- 
astic than ever about Abbot! 

Marion Kimball Bigelow 

Marian Ailing Bradley writes that her 
daughter, Marian, is a sophomore at Bryn 
Mawr, and her son, Michael, is captain of 
the soccer team at Deerfield. She has one 
grandchild, Lucinda. 



The mothers of the Day Students and the Andover alumnae raised 
S417 for the Gymnasium Fund at a dessert bridge, April 25, 1956. 



23 



Elizabeth Bulkeley has returned to South- 
port, Conn., to open a Religious Education 
Consultation Center. She is going to act as 
consultant or adviser in Religious Education 
to nearby churches on a short-term basis. 

Frances Gasser Stover writes, "I have two 
lovely grandchildren. Susan, our son's little 
girl is 2I/2, and Joan's child is six months. 
Joan lives in Port Washington, and Kit and 
Marcia are nearby. It's nice to have them so 
near." 

Virginia Hemingway Spayde is now living 
in Lansing, Mich. She is a substitute teacher 
in the Lansing kindergarten and primary 
grades. She writes that the latch-string is 
always out for all Abbot alumnae at her 
home at 719 South Grand, Lansing. 

Libby Thompason Winslow's three daugh- 
ters are married. One lives in Germany, 
another in California, and the third in Conn. 
She has one grandchild. She was in Cali- 
fornia the fifth of May, so could not attend 
the reunion. 

1922 

Juliet Haskell Carrington writes, "I always 
peruse news of '22 in the Bulletin with much 
interest. My biggest news is that my son, 
George, has passed his comprehensives and 
orals for his doctorate in English, apparently 
with a brilliant record. He is in his third 
year as a graduate assistant in the English 
Department at Ohio State University. My 
daughter, Juliet, has been a teaching fellow 
in the Geology Dept. at Bryn Mawr for 
three years and hopes to take her M.S. this 
spring — just a side line to being happily 
married. George is married, too, to a 
Wellesley Phi Beta Kappa. They are almost 
too erudite for me! 

"I am librarian at our small library for 
sixteen hours a week. I also play the organ 
for St. Matthias Episcopal Church. These, 
together with housekeeping duties, giving 
my mother four shots a week for pernicious 
anaemia, and gardening activities, both at 
home and in the Garden Club, keep me 
about as busy as I can be. I have time for a 
bridge game once in a while and a Women's 
Club meeting, but not too much. 

"I hope to play hookey from the library 
for three months, starting in May. I have an 
invitation to tour Europe by car, and I have 
my fingers crossed, hoping that all will go 
well, so that my hope will come true. It does 
seem as if I am always occupied at time of 



reunion, but I may get there some day and 
would love to." 

Olive Howard Vance writes, "This has 
been quite a winter! Our sixth grandchild 
was born to Peter and Barbara, Dec. 29, 
1955 — their second daughter. The seventh 
grandbaby born March 9, 1956 to Gale and 
Jerome was another girl. Regardless of how 
many there are, I am thrilled with each one, 
and, of course, they are all extra beautiful." 

1923 

Edith Damon Bugbee's son, S. Jonathan, 
was married in October, 1955. 

Dorothy Taylor Booth has a third grand- 
daughter, Violette, who is the daughter of 
Lee Booth Witwer, 1948. 

1926 

The class of 1926 had their 30th reunion 
on May 5. Ten of us came back — Virginia 
Spear Houghton, Alice Perry, Jane Ruth 
Hovey, Olive Rogers Smith, Priscilla Perkins 
Leach, Katherine Clay Sawyer, Ruth Dead- 
man McLennan, Elinor Mahoney Smith, 
Frances Flagg Sanborn, and Edith Ireland 
Wood. 

We had a wonderful day from start to 
finish — the meeting, the delicious lunch 
served us by the school, the tour of the 
school, including the beautiful new gym- 
nasium, the bazaar and our dinner at 
Levaggi's. 

We had a meeting at Frances Flagg San- 
born's delightful home and voted to pay 
Si. 00 dues a year to build up our bank 
account so that we may make a gift to the 
school on our 35th reunion. We elected 
Virginia Spear Houghton reunion chairman 
and secretary of the Alumnae Fund for the 
class. 

Virginia Spear Houghton 
Reunion Chairman. 

The class extends its sympathy to Jean 
Donald Manus whose father died in March. 

Louise Douglass Hill is living in South 
Hadley Falls, Mass. Her husband is working 
at the Westover Air Base. Louise's older 
daughter, Ellen, finished her training as a 
Medical Technologist in December, and is 
now working at the Robert Bent Brigham 
Hospital in Boston. Her younger daughter, 
Sarah, is entering high school this fall. The 
class will be sorry to learn that Louise's 
father died last November. 

Caroline Hopkins McLean writes that her 



24 



A studio grand piano was presented to Abbot in memory of Mabel 
G. Bacon (Mrs. Philip F. Ripley), who taught Latin at Abbot from 1899 
to 1903. It was given by her three children, George, Susan Ripley Ward, 
1928, and Helen, 1930. 



oldest son, Alan, graduated from Amherst 
last year and is now at Yale Divinity School. 
Her sons, Marshall and Bob, are students at 
Amherst. Her daughter, Anne, is a junior at 
Concord Academy. 

The class extends its sympathy to Priscilla 
Perkins Leach whose husband died Jan. 29, 
1956, in Old Greenwich, Conn. 

1927 

The class extends its sympathy to Edna 
Marland whose mother died May 4, 1956. 

Harriet Sullivan Wallace's son, Miles A. 
Rock, returned last November, and was 
discharged the same month. He was married 
April 17 to Diane Bulkeley of Stratford, 
Conn. They met at Prep School. Miles is now 
working as a laboratory technician and 
taking courses in Math at the University of 
Bridgeport. 

1928 

The class extends its sympathy to Anne 
Sutton Weld whose husband died Feb. 10, 
I956- 

1929 
Born 

To Rosamond Wheeler Putnam, a daughter, 
Rebecca, January 17, 1956. 

1930 

Nini Owsley Warwick spent six weeks in 
Hawaii during the winter. This information 
was contributed by her son, Douglas. 

1931 

Hello out there! Our 25th reunion was a 
great success — though the 1 6 who returned 
surely missed those of you who didn't. 

It was a busy day — after the annual 
meeting, we toured the wonderful new 
Gymnasium, and then enjoyed a most 
delicious luncheon as guests of the school. 
In the afternoon we gathered in our private 
room at the Inn where we watched Carol 
Grosvenor Myers' riotous moving pictures of 
the Intervale trip and typical school days at 
Abbot in the year 1931. Many thanks to 
Carol for supplying these pictures, for they 
were the highlight of our reunion. We had a 



leisurely dinner at the Inn, and later in the 
evening we drove to Jane Sullivan's home 
where we happily completed a wonderful 
day. 

Betty Dix Goddard 
Reunion Chairman. 

Greetings to all the girls were received 
from Emily Bullock, Betty Flory Jones, 
Eleanor Royce Groff, and Dorothy Stevenson 
Russell. 

Connie Chamber lin Harris writes, "I wish I 
could be at reunion, but with 200 chin- 
chillas, two children, and a husband away a 
great deal, I can't." 

Raymah Davis Harper's son, Graham, 
Jr., is graduating from school this year, and 
has hopes of going to Cornell in the fall. 

Chub Graham Holland is active in the 
Pediatrics Department at the hospital in 
Lansing, and is also quite a golfer. She 
spends her summers at a ranch in Saratoge, 
Wyo. 

Cathie Ireland Lenz is now living in Ft. 
Lauderdale with her two sons and her 
husband. Her son, George, graduates from 
high school in June. Her younger son is 
eight. Her husband is in business making 
concrete patio blocks and sells steel. 

The class extends its sympathy to Charlotte 
Marland whose mother died May 4, 1956. 

Mary Elisabeth Olson Crum returned to 
the United States last October after a year 
in Japan. While she was in Japan she studied 
the language and Japanese flower arrange- 
ment, and also tutored Japanese girls in 
English. 

1932 

Isabel Arms flew to Paris last November. 
She toured in Italy and Spain, arriving home 
in time for Christmas. 

Married 
Ruth Lydia Mailey to Donald D. Suther- 
land, November 27, 1955, in the Chapel of 
Berkeley Divinity School in Berkeley, Calif. 

1935 

We have recently learned that Miriam 
Hamilton is now Mrs. Arthur K. Berliner. 



2 5 



Anne Hurlburt Bradley writes, "We are now 
living in Colorado. My husband is the 
managing director of Winter Park Ski Area 
about ioo miles from Boulder. I commute 
week ends with the four children, who are 
getting to be excellent skiers. Lynn is 13, 
Dan, 11, Kathy, 7, and Timothy, 3." 

Born 
To Eleanor Johnson Du Toit, a fourth 
child and second son, Robert Johnson, 
January 9, 1956. Eleanor's other children 
are Susan, who is a freshman in high school, 
Ellen, a sixth grader, and Charley, a third 
grader, who is bursting with energy in all 
directions. Her husband is directing the 
Chem Lab at M.G.H. and Baker Memorial, 
teaching, practicing and doing research. 

1936 

These notes were contributed by Lucy 
Hawkes Lamson, Reunion Chairman. 

The class extends its sympathy to Sally 
Burns Bowen whose husband died in March. 

Ann Dodge Green writes of her two chil- 
dren, Anzie, 5^, and Dickie, 3, and of an 
even busier pottery business. 

Mary Dooley Bragg's husband is assistant 
general manager of the Respro division of 
General Tire and Rubber Co., in Cranston, 
R. I. 

Phyllis Fisher Tobey writes that Anne 
Simpson White '38 lives }/% miles away from 
her, and Phyllis sees her and her 6 girls 
occasionally. 

Clara Holland Chase is in Hawaii with her 
Navy husband, who is Commanding Officer 
of his Squadron and due for his Captaincy 
anytime. Their girls, Sue, 14, and Mimi, 11, 
like it there tremendously. They see Mary 
Toohey Kruse quite often. Clara urges any- 
one going to Hawaii to look her up. 

Priscilla Mailey writes, "I am as busy as a 
bird dog teaching Social Studies and Jour- 
nalism in the Sierra Foothills. How I miss 
the snow — we're at 2,000 elevation, but 
seldom even have a snow flurry. I'll be home 
this summer after two months in Europe." 

Frances Mahonev Gay enjoys Atlanta, Ga., 
where she has lived for 7 years. She has two 
children, Ben, II, 13, and Jane, 7. 

Barbara Souther Cooke's husband is at the 
Imperial War College in London for a year. 

Polly Spear Chapin had a coffee for a- 
lumnae in the Newton, Mass., area, March 

I3> J 956- 
The class extends its sympathy to Eleanor 



Wells Nudd whose mother died suddenly in 
February. 

Married 

Ruth Wittig to Louis A. Haynes, Sep- 
tember 30, 1955, in West Newton, Mass. 
Mr. Haynes graduated from the University 
of North Carolina. 

1937 

Louise Risley Stever's husband has been 
appointed Associate Dean of the School of 
Engineering at M.I.T. He was also promoted 
from Associate Professor to Professor of 
Aeronautical Engineering. 

1938 

Diana Hope Greene Helfrich is living in 
Coronado, Calif, where her husband is 
stationed. She has three children, Hope, 11, 
David, 6^/2, an d Michael, 1^. She writes, 
"I would love to hear from old friends in 
this part of the country." (Address: 1718 
Visalia Row, Coronado, Calif.) 

Mary Toohey Kruse has just returned to 
Honolulu after a trip to Japan, China, Siam, 
Australia, and the Fiji Islands. 

1939 

Mary Curtis Verna received 30 curtain 
calls for her performance in the title role of 
the opera Pantea, which she sang in Palermo, 
Sicily, on April 15. 

Lloyd Pierce Smith is planning to spend 
two months in Europe this summer. Her 
children will be with her parents in Palo 
Alto, Calif. Her husband is now a research 
assistant at the Woods Hole Oceanographic 
Institute in Woods Hole, Mass. 
Born 

To Marjory Hill Bowen, a daughter, 
Molly Patricia, September 30, 1955. 

1941 

These notes were contributed by Doris 
Jones Hannegan, Reunion Chairman. 

Phyllis Campbell Crowell: "No particular 
news at this point — just running around 
in circles with these four children. What 
will I be like with 5!!!" 

Nancy Eccles Roome: "We've just moved 
from Greenwich, Conn., to Northampton, 
Mass. I've just produced our fourth daughter 
(Gay, Melanie, Robin and Adrianna) and 
my days are pretty full at this point. Hope 
reunion is a big success." 

Betty Harris Coates: "Sorry I won't be 
able to make the reunion this time. I have a 
new baby (2nd child, 2nd boy) born last 



26 



September and he keeps me stepping. Say 
hello to the rest for me and I hope you all 
have as good a time as we did on our ioth." 

Eloise Perkins Beck: "Am not going to be 
able to come to our 15th. Surely do hope to 
surprise everyone by attending at least one. 
Am in my sixth year of first-grade teaching. 
Daughter, Pam, is 9 and in the fourth grade. 
We're planning a trek to Mass. and Maine 
in late July. Wish it could be earlier." 

Emily Ruth Poynter: "I'm still working 
at Temple University Hospital and Medical 
School as a Psychiatric and Medical Social 
Worker. Presently I'm an Associate in 
Psych Social Work at the Medical School 
and have a class from 9-12 Saturday morn- 
ings. Please give my best to our classmates." 

Dorothy Fiske Winnette: "Sorry, but I 
won't be able to make reunion this time 
either. We're expecting our fifth child the 
latter part of this month and May 5th will 
doubtless find me a bit involved. Our gang 
is all male so far: Mark is 8, Ward 6, Miles 
4^ and Lyle almost 3. No other news, 
except that we moved into a nice, roomy 5- 
bedroom house last summer, which is a joy 
and a convenience. Best to all the 41-ers." 
Dorothy's first daughter was born March 12, 

I95 6 - 

Sue Woodman McSherry: "No chance I 
am afraid this year of reunion way down in 
Penna. With my 20 month old daughter and 
son in kindergarten — not too free at the 
moment. This is our fifth move in six years 
and hope to stay. Love the main line. Bob is 
an Asst. Prof, at Jefferson Med School. Any- 
body in the class around here? Tell them to 
look me up." 

Sue Long Reed: "Since we're expecting 
our baby April 29th, the 15th reunion is out 
of the question. I know it will be a success 
and wish I could be there. Please tell every- 
one we'll be at West Point until June '57 
and we'd love to have anyone come visit." 

Joan Belden McDonough: "How I would 
love to be at the 15th (doesn't seem possible) 
reunion, but I'm sorry I'll have to refuse 
again. Maybe one of these years I can make 
it — if we move closer to the East. Do hope 
everyone who goes has a wonderful time and 
I'll be thinking of you." 

Jane Philbin Dreyfuss: "Unfortunately it 
is impossible for me to make the 1 5th reunion. 
But if the next 5 years fly as quickly, I'll see 
you soon at the 20th. The New York Club 
is having Mrs. Crane here for the Spring 



Luncheon so I will have a chance to meet 
her. My only other news is that I'm working 
away for my Master's degree at Teachers 
College, Columbia, and should have it by 
the end of summer." 

Jane Parrot Brown: "Sure would love to 
get back to Abbot for Alumnae Day but 
can't see how. 15 years is a staggering 
number. Nothing new to report from the 
Brown family. Vital statistics show our size 
the same, 1 boy, 1 girl and 2 dogs. Doing the 
usual suburban things and busy as all get 
out." 

Nancy Gerrish MacFadyen: "Barring 
major upheavals here, I plan to make the 
reunion May 5th, and hope a good many of 
the rest do the same. The only new thing 
with us is the baby, who is trying her best 
(ably seconded by the other two) to make 
me feel this should be the 50th rather than 
the 15th." 

Jane Towne Johnston: "Can't believe it's 
the 15th reunion this year — time certainly 
flies! Wish I could be at Abbot this year, but 
I doubt that I can make it, though I'll be 
thinking of everyone. This is Dick's first 
Spring here in Washington for several years, 
so we hope to enjoy it fully, gardening, etc. 
Nicest part of the year here. I hope everyone 
has a grand time at the Reunion." 

Jo Hartwell Boddington: "Would that I 
might make the reunion, but 'tis impossible. 
We're saving all our coins in the hope we 
will be able to go to Europe next winter." 

The class will be sorry to learn that 
Frances Troub Roberts' husband died last 
August. She and her husband were on a 
Windjammer cruise in Chesapeake Bay. 
Their boat capsized and sank during 
Hurricane Connie, August 12 — fourteen 
were lost, thirteen were saved. Fran was 
picked up by a rescue boat six hours later. 
She writes, "Am pretty well settled in a 
house of our own in West Hartford, and am 
teaching nursery school five mornings a 
week. The girls are fine and keep me 
blessedly busy. Address: 44 Longlane Road, 
West Hartford, Conn." 

For the handful of us who returned for our 
15th reunion, the change from June to a May 
Alumnae Day proved to be a most successful 
one. We welcomed the opportunity of seeing 
Abbot functioning at a more normal pace 
than the necessarily hectic days of graduation 
weekend could afford. The Bazaar for 
Abbot's birthday provided a perfect setting 



27 



where we could mingle freely and informally 
with the students, our friends among the 
faculty, and each other, and find a trinket or 
two to bring home for the children. 

The only cloud in the incredibly blue sky 
at our "15th" was the very small number 
that managed to get back. Emmy Mills 
Courtice, Mim Scammon Ladd, Nancy 
Whittier Atkinson, and Franny Troub Roberts 
exchanged news of our far-flung friends on 
the steps of McKeen before the luncheon. 
Later, we discovered Susan Woodman Mc- 
Sherry, ex-^i, accompanying her mother 
who was here for her 40th reunion! Many of 
you must have felt your ears ring as we spoke 
of you and wished that more of our class 
could have shared this wonderful day. 

Franny Troub Roberts 
Married 

Helen B. Stott to Chaloner B. Spencer of 
South Deerfield, Mass., April 14, 1956, in 
Northampton, Mass. Ruth Stott Peters '34 
was the maid of honor. Mr. Spencer was 
graduated from Princeton and received his 
master's degree in Music from the University 
of California. He is teaching English in the 
Deerfield High School. 

Born 

To Nancy Kelley Park, a fifth child and 
second daughter, Rebecca Chapman, April 

30, 1956. 

1942 

Ann Bacon Reinheimer writes, "We 
moved to Evanston in November, 1955. 
John is getting an M.A. in Education, 
lecturing at Seabury- Western Seminary, and 
assisting at a church. Our four children are 
all in school, David, 10, Jan, 8, Betsy, 6, and 
Peggy, 4. We plan to move again in June, 
but don't know where. 

Pat Daniels Hanson and her husband are 
building a home in Bellevue, Wash. — just 
across the floating bridge from Seattle. 
Pat's husband is the West Coast manager for 
the Borden Co. Chemical Division. 

Barbara Sanders Damon writes that her 
son, Jimmy, is eight years old. She has just 
moved to Abington, Mass., and would love 
to see any Abbot girls in the vicinity. Ad- 
dress: Mrs. Wilton W. Dadmun, 67 Col. 
Hunt Drive, Abington, Mass. 
Engaged 

Dr. Mary Louise Bertucio to Dr. John 
Hampton Arnold of Boston. Dr. Arnold, a 
graduate of the University of Texas and 
Tulane University School of Medicine, is a 



research fellow in pediatrics at the Chil- 
dren's Medical Center in Boston. 
Born 

To Eleanor Cole Meyer, a fifth child, 
Harriot Hornblower, January 30, 1956. 

To Nancy Steele Baxter, a third child and 
first daughter, Elizabeth Morman, No- 
vember 12, 1955. Her two boys are Bill, 6^, 
and Dan, 4. 

1944 
Engaged 

Carol Paradise to Frederick H. Decker of 
Princeton, N. J. Mr. Decker is a graduate of 
Hebron Junior College and Marquette Uni- 
versity and received his M.A. from the Uni- 
versity of Chicago. He served in the Air 
Force and worked as a civilian with the 
Army educational program in Japan and 
Alaska. He is now working with the Edu- 
cational Testing Service in Princeton. 

Born 

To Cynthia Holmes Spurr, a son, Gregory 
Waterman, III, December 10, 1955. Cynthia 
writes, "We have been living in a charming 
old Victorian house since October, 1954, in 
Millington, N. J. We love being in the 
country, and yet so near New York." 

1945 

Edith Walker Upham writes that she is now 
living in Washington. Her husband is 
assistant to the Executive Director of the 
Security Exchange Commission. Edith has 
three daughters. 

Married 

Jean L. Mulvey to John Christopher 
Friedmann of New York, February 1 1, 1956, 
in New York. Mr. Friedmann is a graduate 
of Harvard University and is associated with 
an Oil Company in its New York office. 
Born 

To Ruth Lazarus Cole, a third child and 
second daughter, Debra Lazarus, January 
12, 1956. 

1946 

Reunion this year came on Abbot's Birth- 
day, and we were blessed with a glorious 
spring day. As representatives of 1946, we 
were a very small crew, but we tried val- 
iantly to catch up on some of our missing 
members. Ellen Brumback had just been in 
Florida and saw GB Wright James and 
Margie Sommer Tucker. Jennie Copeland 
Dufford called from Colorado to send her 
greetings to everyone. 

Those of us who were there found Abbot 



28 



at her loveliest in May. We rediscovered the 
maple walk — the Circle — the library — 
saw the new gym — prowled the corridors 
for "our room" — and in the chapel, had 
the thrill of singing Fair Alma Mater with the 
new seniors and of realizing we remembered 
all the words! 

All this is wonderful to look back on, but 
it would have been even better if we'd 
matched the 50-year class, which had perfect 
attendance! Let's start working up to that 
for that next time. As reunion chairman for 
1 96 1, I want to urge everyone to begin 
planning — right now! 

Marian Troub Friedman 

Frances Little has been appointed as- 
sistant news editor to the Tool Engineer 
editorial staff of the American Society of 
Tool Engineers. She will edit and prepare 
articles for the news section of the magazine 
on chapter and national activities of the 
society. 

The class will be sorry to hear that Sally 
North Jones lost her second son, Chris, very 
suddenly May 1, 1956. 

Born 

To Mary Burton Blakney, a third son, 
April 6, 1956. 

To Deborah Wiggin Cameron, a second 
child and first daughter, Dorothy Simson, 
January 19, 1956. 

1947 
Born 

To Patricia Carroll Dunsmore, a fourth 
child and third daughter, Carol Elizabeth, 
February 7, 1956. 

To Barbara Dean Bolton, a third child and 
second daughter, Elizabeth Dean, May 9, 

1955- 

To Mary Lou Miller Hart, a second child 
and first son, David, August 26, 1955. 

To Nancy Scripture Garrison, a second 
child and first son, Timothy Paine, February 
11, 1956. 

1948 

Jane Jackson Parks and her family live in 
the sub-tropical paradise of Naples-on-the- 
Gulf, Fla. Her husband is a lawyer and owner 
of the Gulf Realty Co. 

Nancy B. Nalle is a secretary in adminis- 
tration at Bryn Mawr Hospital. 
Married 

Mary Annis Rich to Thomas Harold 
Ohlweiler, Jr., of Metuchen, N. J., May 5, 
1956, in West New Brighton, N. Y. Mr. 
Ohlweiler is an alumnus of Colgate Uni- 




Randy, Harry, and Ben Parks, children of 
Jane Jackson Parks '48. 

versity. Elizabeth Rich Ferguson '44 was 
matron of honor. 

Hannah Richmond to Harold Hammer, 
March 1, 1956, in New York. Mr. Hammer 
is in the investment business. 

Genevieve Young to Cedric Sun of White 
Plains, N. Y., April 14, 1956, in New York. 
Shirley Young '51 was maid of honor, and 
Frances Young '57 was an attendant. Mr. 
Sun attended Hackley School and is a 
graduate of Cooperstown Academy and 
Lafayette College. 

Born 

To Lee Booth Witwer, a third daughter, 
Violette, January 14, 1956. 

To Nancy Elliot Stewart, a second child 
and first daughter, Amy Elizabeth, February 
12, 1956. 

To Elizabeth McConnel Barnett, a son, 
Robert F., Ill, January 29, 1956. Betty is 
in California for two years while her husband 
is a physician in the Navy at Camp Pendle- 
ton. 

To Mary Marton Davenport, a third child 
and first daughter, Katharine Joyce, January 
14, 1956. Mary is living in Minneapolis. Her 
husband received his M.S. in Mechanical 
Engineering from M.I.T. in February, and 
is working in the Research Development 
section of Toro Manufacturing Co. Mary's 
other children are Billy, 15 months, and 
Georgie, 2 >£■ 

To Mackay Selden Bush, a daughter, 
Martha Holbest, January 20, 1956. 

To Mary Carroll Sinclaire Morris, a 
daughter, Katrina, October 6, 1955. 



29 



1949 

Engaged 

Elinor Bozyan to George S. Warburg of 
London. Elinor finished her job with the 
Winant Volunteers last October, and plans 
to be married this summer. 

Mary Lois Pendleton to Charles Rowen 
Beye of Cambridge, Mass. He is a graduate 
of the State University of Iowa and the 
Harvard Graduate School of Arts and 
Sciences. He is an instructor at Wheaton 
College, Norton, Mass. 

Married 

Sally Gibbs to George Sachs of New York 
and San Paulo, Brazil, March 12, 1955. Mr. 
Sachs studied at St. George's School in 
Europe, Perkiomen Preparatory School in 
Penna., Emery University and Columbia. 
He is now serving with the Army in Munich, 
Germany, and Sally is with him. 
Born 

To Ann Chivers Stevens, a second child and 
first daughter, March 21, 1956. 

1950 

Taffy Lattin Dunbar, her husband and 
children, Becky, 4, and Billy, 2^, spent a 
month in Conn, last fall. 

Eva Sontum is working in the flavor 
laboratory of Arthur D. Little Co. in Cam- 
bridge, Mass. 

Married 

Dorothy W. Bowman to James Alvin 
Crawford of Ossining, N. Y., March 10, 
1956, in Easton, Md. Mr. Crawford is an 
alumnus of Ridley College, St. Katherine, 
Ont., and of Queen's University, Kingston, 
Ont. He is associated with General Motors, 
in Tarrytown, N. Y. 

Born 

To Cynthia Atwood Couch, a daughter, 
Cathryn Elizabeth, January 16, 1956. 
Cynthia and her husband are now living in 
Birmingham, Mich., where he is a District 
Engineer in the Detroit area for the Torring- 
ton Co. 

To Georgette Davis Ferrante, a second 
son, November 28, 1955. 

To Helen Sinclaire Blythe, a second son, 
October 26, 1955. 

To Sally Stevens MacMillan, a second 
daughter, Katherine Wells, December 15, 
1955. Sally, her husband, and children are 
going to Geneva, Switzerland for a few years. 



1951 

I think that those of us who attended our 
first reunion, in spite of having been out for 
five years, and having received the Alumnae 
Bulletin regularly, and having done a 
multitude of things since we left Abbot, felt 
for the first time like true alumnae. And it 
was a rather funny feeling in a sense, for 
here we were looking exactly the same to 
each other as we always had, and yet feeling 
centuries older in wisdom and experience 
than the present students, and at the same 
time being looked upon as bright children 
who were coming along nicely by the older 
reunioning classes. It was said, as a matter 
of fact, that we, as a 5-year class, had a 
particularly good turnout. 

I might add that it was really lots of fun 
to see each other again, and hear what had 
been done in the way of degrees, husbands, 
babies, careers, and travel since '51. The 
luncheon was magnificent, and Mrs. Crane 
enchanted us all by sitting down with us 
during dessert to pass the time of day. The 
Abbot Bazaar that afternoon was just as we 
remembered it with decorated booths, 
gardenias, bagpipes, cotton skirts, and P.A. 
boys in the late afternoon, and those of us 
who saw the new Abbot Gymnasium were 
really impressed and decided once and for 
all that we were born too soon. 

Polly W. Paradise 

Sue Batchelder is majoring in Sociology 
at the University of New Hampshire. 

Nancy Bentley Ridings has been living in 
Manchester, Mass., where her husband is in 
G.E.'s manufacturing training program. 
She has two daughters, Sybil, 3, and Nan, 2. 

Zizi Chase is working in Cardiac Research 
at the Massachusetts General Hospital. She 
is planning to be married in June. 

Pat Driscoll has been in Cambridge this 
year at the Harvard-Radcliffe Program of 
Business Administration. She finishes this 
year. This summer she is going to Europe 
with her brothers. She is going to buy a car 
and do a little touring. 

Linn Furst toured Europe during the 
summer with a Simmons Student Tour. She 
is now working in Smithport, Pa., as a 
social worker in Rural Child Welfare. 

Mimi Nesbit traveled in Mexico with her 
family last fall. She is now working for 
American Airlines. 

Polly Paradise writes, "After five years I 
am finally finishing my education in Oc- 



3° 



tober when I graduate from Mt. Holyoke 
College - Hartford Hospital combined 
Nursing Program. Then I hope to work in 
the Boston area." 

Frances Russell Phelps writes, "Jack and I 
have a small apartment in West Hartford. 
I am working at the Hartford Hospital in 
the Physical Therapy Dept. We are expecting 
in September." 

Sylvie Wallace writes that she is at home 
in Bermuda after a graduation trip to 
Europe. She visited in England for five 
months, and took a summer course at 
Lausanne University in Switzerland. Sylvie 
is now teaching the fifth grade in St. George's 
School in Bermuda. 

Fay White is the buyer in the children's 
department at Giles' department store in 
Jackson, Miss. 

Engaged 

Ann Caldwell Jenckes to Lt. John Evans 
Eckelberry of Bucks County, Pa. Lt. Eckel- 
berry was graduated from Yale in 1955. 
Married 

Joan Godfrey to James Frederick Emmert 
of Newton Centre, Mass., March 3, 1956, in 
Andover. Joan Morrison '51 and Barbara 
Nichols Kurth '52 were bridesmaids. 

Elizabeth Marshall to Stephen Michael 
Thomas of New Canaan, Conn., January 14, 
1956. Mr. Thomas, who prepared at Pom- 
fret and Exeter, majored in Slavic languages 
and literature at Harvard and is now finish- 
ing his term of service in the Army. 

Sandra C. Smith to Leonard V. Short, Jr., 
of Lexington, Mass., January 28, 1956. Mr. 



Short was graduated from the New Pre- 
paratory School and attended Kenyon 
College. He served with the Army in the Far 
East for three years and is attending Boston 
University. Sandy is teaching kindergarten 
in Newton, Mass. 

Margaret P. Whittall to 2d Lt. David 
Nelson Hoadley of Washington, Conn., May 
12, 1956. Lt. Hoadley was graduated from 
Gunnery School and Yale. He is now serving 
with U. S. Army in Japan. 

1952 

A paper written by Betsy Aldrich has been 
accepted for publication in the Journal of 
Social Psychology. The paper reports a 
study in experimental psychology of 50 
Wheaton students. 

Susan Hunter writes, "I am in Beirut for a 
year while my family is here in connection 
with the United Nations Relief and Works 
Agency for Palestine Refugees. I am spend- 
ing my senior year at the Beirut College for 
Women, from which I hope to get an A.B. in 
June. My major has been English-Art. For 
my Senior thesis project this year I have 
started a literary and creative arts magazine 
at the college. Bless my early Courant training! 

"My family will be heading home again 
in July, and we plan to see something of 
Europe on the way. I hope to spend a week 
in Italy revisiting friends made during last 
year when I was part of the Smith Junior 
Year in Florence. Then I shall start pave- 
ment pounding in New York looking for a 
job on a magazine." 



Lorna Ball '52 — Dean's List — University of Michigan 

Jean Donovan '55 — Vice-president Y.W.C.A. — Colby Junior College 

Suzanne E. Fraser '54 — Dean's List — Boston University 

Elizabeth L. Harman '54 — Dean's List — Marjorie Webster Junior College 

Anna Hewlett '54 — Dean's List — Barnard College 

Ann Hunt '54 — President of Sophomore Class — Vassar College 

Joan Lamprey '55 — Dean's List — Pine Manor Junior College 

Katherine Stirling '55 — Freshman Honor Roll — Bradford Junior College 



3i 



Engaged 

Rita De Rosa to Lt. Robert Lawrence 
Kallman of Kenilworth, 111. Lt. Kallman is a 
graduate of Northwestern University and 
Northwestern Law School. 

Simone May Mathey to Dowling Frank 
Stackpole of East Paterson, N. J. Mr. Stack- 
pole was graduated from Chesire Academy 
and attended the University of Connecticut. 
He is employed in Middletown, N. Y., as a 
district executive of the Boy Scouts. 

Nancy Muth to William W. Clements, Jr. 
He is a graduate of Wesleyan, and is studying 
at Jefferson Medical College. They plan to be 
married in June. 

Born 

To Shirley Stahler Childs, a son, April 14, 

!95 6 - 

1953 

Nancy Bailey is majoring in Italian at 
Vassar. She spent last summer in Italy 
studying at the University of Florence. She 
was on the Daisy Chain last spring. 

Janet Bowden writes that she has con- 
tinued in the paths of Spanish and music at 
Smith. She is a Latin American major. 
Engaged 

Audrey Taylor to Robert Appleby Mac- 
Lean of New York. Mr. MacLean, a gradu- 
ate of St. Paul's School, is a senior at Yale. 

Ann Zuill to Lt. Colin McCann Williams 
of London, England. 



1954 

Nancy-Jean Smith sailed in February for a 
year of study at the Sorbonne in Paris. She 
is a member of the "Hollins Abroad" foreign 
study program, which extends from the 
middle of the Sophomore year to the middle 
of the Junior year. 

Engaged 
Audrey Davis to Edward Remington 
Trowbridge, III, of Providence, R. I. Mr. 
Trowbridge is a graduate of the Hotchkiss 
School and Yale. He served six years in the 
Armed Forces and is presently associated 
with the Gorham Silver Co. in Providence. 

Married 
Patricia Emery to Warren Wolfe, February 
6, 1956, in Bartow, Fla. Mr. Wolfe attended 
the University of Kentucky, and will gradu- 
ate from Florida Southern College in June. 

1955 

Pam Carpenter is social chairman of her 
House at Connecticut, and also is the repre- 
sentative of the Freshman class on the 
Student-Faculty Forum. 

Jean Donovan is sports manager of her 
dormitory at Colby Junior College. 

Nancy Eastham is a member of the Mount 
Holyoke Freshman choir. 

Dee Fleming is a member of the Concordes, 
a singing group at Connecticut. 



Cum Laude 1956 



Jaqueline L'Engle Chase 
Nancy Lynn Dowlin 
Marilyn June Emsley 
Barbara Natalie Henry 
Rachel Revere Kimball 



Susan Jacqueline Knox 
Eleanor Catherine Morgan 
Sheila Susan Prial 
Sarah Malane Sullivan 
Jane Rea Sweetsir 



Susan Stillman Waterous 



32 



fy aub Gulleut & merit*, — Please 

Send us all the news that's fit, and your friends will have the news they 
crave. 

Send to the Alumnae Office, Abbot Academy, Andover, Mass., before 
September 15, 1956. 



Today's date 

Maiden Name Class .... 

Married Name 

Address 

Postal Zone 



:;;§§!§-,, 





Sent by the School to all Abbot Girls 



ABBOT ACADEMY BULLETIN 

Series 23 SEPTEMBER, 1956 Issue 4 



Change of Address 
Issue 



Published four times yearly, October, February, May, and September, by Abbot Acad- 
emy, Andover, Massachusetts. 

Entered as second class matter December 12, 1933, at the post office at Andover, Mass- 
achusetts, under the act of August 24, 191 2. 



Changes of Address Since September 1955 

Suggestion: Attach this to your 1952 Register. 



1886 
Beach, Elizabeth Rogers Aff. 

Mrs. Edward P. Harris 

612-23rd Ave. N., St. Petersburg, Fla. 

1889 
Kiesel, Wilhemine Aff. 

Mrs. William H. Shearman 
2532 Eccles Ave., Ogden, Utah 

1893 
Abbott, Caddie 

Mrs. Isaac S. Smith 
% Mrs. H. A. Buell 
829 E. 7th St., Kinsley, Kan. 
Gardner, Katherine Aff. 

Mrs. Austin V. Miller 

180 Park Dr., Porterville, Calif. 

1894 
Carter, Adelle Aff. 

Mrs. Adna C. Denison 
430 Centre St., Newton 58, Mass. 
McAllister, Florence A. Aff. 

Mrs. Ralph Brackett 

300 Commonwealth Ave., Attleboro Falls, Mass. 
Mathes, Mary Aff. 

Mrs. Fred W. Smith 

160 Gordonhurst, Upper Montclair, N. J. 
Stone, Mabel 

Mrs. M. C. Griffin 

224 Florence Ave., Waynesboro, Va. 

1895 
Drury, Charlotte K. 

Fuglegaards vej. 7, Gentofta, Denmark 
Edwards, Frances Aff. 

Mrs. William F. Quayle 

Forest Home Ranch, R.D. 3, 19953 San Ramon 
Rd., Hayward, Calif. 

1896 
Start, Mabel S. Aff. 

Mrs. James L. H. Carr 

115-5th Ave. N.E., St. Petersburg, Fla. 

1897 
Haley, Dora Aff. 

Mrs. Willis McDuffee 

45 Wakefield St., Rochester, N. H. 

1898 
Flint, Nellie Aff. 

Mrs. Joseph A. Rand 
12 Rip Rd., Hanover, N. H. 
Hand, Mary Aff. 

Mrs. W. E. Carlisle 

Seneca Hotel, 361 E. Broad St., Columbus 15, 
Ohio 

1899 
Keniston, Sarah 

Mrs. Walter M. Clark 

% Peabody, Westmoreland, N. H. 
Marsh, Marion Aff. 

Mrs. Francis L. O' Bryan 

5 Upland Rd., Ashland, Mass. 
Ryder, Mary 

2305 University Ave., New York 68, N. Y. 

1900 
Morgan, Mary 

Mrs. John L. Norwood 

3501 St. Paul St., Baltimore 18, Md. 

1901 
Brooks, Ethel Aff. 

Mrs. Alexander H. Scott 
111 Brookside Rd., New Britain, Conn. 
Holt, Charlotte 

Mrs. Paul R. Burtt 

68 Whittier St., Andover, Mass. 



1902 
Perkins, Ruth Aff. 

Mrs. Harold E. Wiley 

Fairmont Hotel, San Francisco, Calif. 

1903 
Hind, Grace Aff. 

Mrs. Horatio L. Andrews 

150 Fair Oaks Park, Needham 92, Mass. 

1904 
Harmon, Harriet Aff. 

Eastland Hotel, Portland, Me. 

1905 
Tyer, Frances 

Mrs. Douglas G. Crawford 
Riverview, Old Lyme, Conn. 

1906 
Adams, Ruth 

Mrs. Guy W. Downer 

10 Tyler St., Brattleboro, Vt. 

1907 
Hukill, Clara J. 

Mrs. Arthur R. Leeds 

2425 W. St. James Parkway, Cleveland Heights 6, 
Ohio 

1908 
Caunt, Gertrude 

Mrs. Paul V. Barnes 

1077 Orange Grove Ave., Pasadena, Calif. 
Gutterson, Edith 

Mrs. Edith Gutterson 

11615 Riverside Dr., N. Hollywood, Calif. 
Rockwell, Marguerite Aff. 

601 76th Ave., St. Petersburg Beach 6, Fla. 

1909 
DeWitt, Estelle Aff. 

Mrs. Frederic Weston 
Box 445, Wilton, Conn. 
Soule, Cora Aff. 

Mrs. R. Malcolm Robinson 
Standish St., So. Duxbury, Mass. 

1910 
Hayden, Gladys Aff. 

Mrs. Fred D. Seymour 
Fairmont Ave., Chatham, N. J. 
Reigeluth, Ethel 

Mrs. Myron G. Darby 

Crystal Lake, Carbondale, Penna. 

1911 
Bryant, Bessie Aff. 

Mrs. B. M. Pursel 

121 Choctaw Dr., Washington 21, D. C. 
Copeland, Margaret O. 

75 Main St., Thomaston, Me. 
Gowing, Charlotte E. 

Mrs. Charlotte G. Cooper 

% Federation of Protestant Welfare Agencies 
207 Fourth Ave., New York 3, N. Y. 
Pray, Frances 

121 High St., Laconia, N. H. 

1912 
Gould, Marie Aff. 

Mrs. William H. Wildes 

4242 Bordeaux Ave., Dallas 4, Tex. 
Temple, Beatrice Aff. 

Mrs. Howard M. Marjerison 

5 Stone Rd., Belmont 78, Mass. 
Willis, Marion Aff. 

Mrs. Albert R. Davidson 

196 Wayland Ave., Providence, R. I. 

1914 
Hanscom, Helen 

Mrs. Edward N. Winslow 
West Dennis, Mass. 



1915 

(Jackson, Pauline Aff. 

Mrs. Kenneth P. Kempton 

22 Hillside Rd., Wellesley Hills, Mass. 

1916 
■ Weber, Miriam 

Mrs. Edgar C. Hummel 

1540 North State Parkway, Chicago 10, 111. 

1917 
I At wood, Lucy 

Mrs. C. Freeman Olsen 

4152 Prescott, Dallas 19, Tex. 
| Bacon, Elizabeth H. 

Mrs. Donald N. Swain 

Alumnae House, Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, 
N. Y. 
I Hungerford, Esther 

Mrs. Verton L. Staub 

21672 Rainbow Dr., Clearwater, Fla. 
| Solle, Irene Aff. 

245 W. Colorado, 6B, Arcadia, Calif. 
j Van Arsdale, Eloise Aff. 

Mrs. L. Rex Babbitt 

2416 Hogan Dr., Alhambra, Calif. 

1918 
Clark, Dorothea 

Mrs. Paul N. Farnham 

Scipio Center, N. Y. 
Davis, Mary F. 

Mrs. George A. Irwin 

Charlestown Rd., R.F.D. 2, Claremont, N. H. 
Hubbard, Marion 

Mrs. Dexter H. Craig, 2nd 

15 Barbour Lane, Bloomfield Hills, Mich. 
Kishlar, Doris Aff. 

Mrs. Harold W. Crouch 

42 Manor Park Way, Rochester, N. Y. 
Martin, Helen F. 

Mrs. Henry A. Thomas, Jr. 

41 Hubbard Rd., Weston 93, Mass. 
Williams, A. Faith Aff. 

Mrs. Thomas A. Bisson 

152 Grove St., Auburndale, Mass. 

1919 
Alley, Ruth 

Mrs. William A. Rohrbach 

148 NW. 97th St., Miami Shores, Fla. 
Noyes, H. Kathreen 

Mrs. Charles H. Pettit 

359 Heath St., Chestnut Hill 67, Mass. 
McCauley, Virginia 

Mrs. Courtland Otis 

45 Popham Rd., Scarsdale, N. Y. 

1920 
Franklin, Irene 

Mrs. William P. Foster 

Center St., Ballardvale, Mass. 
Lyon, Jean 

Mrs. Gurendra Dhawan 

Snowview Estate, Almora U. P., India 
Warren, Georgia Aff. 

Mrs. Brownlee B. Gauld 

4558 Coldwater Canyon Rd., N. Hollywood, 
Calif. 

1921 
Barber, Lora 

Mrs. Charles J. Dunn, Jr. 

2745 Wood Lane, Davenport, Iowa 
Bulkeley, Elizabeth 

340 Mill Hill Terr., Southport, Conn. 
Day, Margaret Aff. 

Mrs. Richard W. Suydam 

12 South Mountain Ave., Montclair, N. J. 
Dike, M. Kathleen Aff. 

43 Outlook, Wakefield, Mass. 

1922 
Brown, Isabel 

Mrs. W. S. Crawford 
4320 Belclaire, Dallas 1, Tex. 
Gage, Katherine P. 

Sister Mary Anselm 

St. Mary's Convent, Peekskill, N. Y. 



Hemingway, Virginia Aff. 

Mrs. George Spayde 

R. 2, East Jordan, Mich. 
Polk, Mary E. 

Mrs. Lee C. Overstreet 

16 Brandon Rd., Columbia, Mo. 
Welborn, Susana 

Mrs. Welborn Osborn 

1861 Riviera Parkway, Jacksonville 5, Ha. 

1923 
Allen, Jane Aff. 

Mrs. Donald S. Kilby 

173 Island Circle, Sarasota, Fla. 
Goodwin, Ethel 

Mrs. Jesse G. Roberts 

Station A, Wingdale, N. Y. 
Holt, Doris 

Mrs. Edgar W. Flinton 

23 Albin Rd., Delmar, N. Y. 
Lobenstine, Rose 

Mrs. Robert E. O'Bolger 

66 West Lake Rd., Canandaigua, N. Y. 
Taylor, Dorothy 

Mrs. Waller B. Booth, Jr. 

Gibson Island, Md. 
Warren, Eleanor 

66 Orchard St., Westfield, Mass. 
Wright, Raymah 

Mrs. James J. Sutherland 

506 S. Cleveland, Oceanside, Calif. 

1924 
Judd, Melinda 

Mrs. Philip Fosburg 

4 E Westfield Manor, Westfield, N. J. 
King, Maude Aff. 

Mrs. Walter Bonner 

12 Overlook Rd., Cedar Grove, N. J. 
Smith, Susanna 

Mrs. Charles W. Bowler 

132 Waldwick Ave., Waldwick, N. J. 

1925 
Daniell, Susan 

Mrs. W. Arnold Burgess 

226 Maiden Lane, Seattle, Wash. 
Kitchin, Charlotte 

Mrs. Charlotte K. Sears 

555 Haverhill St., Lawrence, Mass. 
Pritchard, Nettie Aff. 

Mrs. Norris W. Potter, Jr. 

44-636 Kaneohe Bay Dr., Kaneohe, Hawaii 
Smith, Elizabeth Aff. 

Veterans Administration Hospital, Oklahoma 
City, Okla. 
Yates, Phyllis 

Mrs. Phyllis Shields 

923 Litchfield Rd., Baltimore 12, Md. 

1926 
Bloomer, Helen Aff. 

Mrs. R. B. Hanley 
4379 Osprey St., San Diego 7, Calif. 
Bullen, Edith 

Mrs. Samuel G. Creden 

Gate House, 1231 Topinadee Rd., Niles, Mich. 
Burr, Marion E. 

Mrs. Frederick D. Sober 
15465 Bradner, Plymouth, Mich. 
Donald, Jean 

Mrs. Worth F. Manus 
47 Interlochen Dr., Atlanta 5, Ga. 
Douglass, Louise 

Mrs. Frederick P. Hill 
7 Joan St., So. Hadley Falls, Mass. 
Doyle, Ethel Aff. 

Mrs. Albert W. Garner 
3407 O St., N.W., Washington 7, D. C. 
Farrington, Ruth E. 

503 Carroll Ave., Laurel, Md. 
Goodwillie, Patricia 

Mrs. Roger W. Blanchard 
1807 Challen Ave., Jacksonville, Fla. 
Kidder, Sara Aff. 
Mrs. James Borst 
860 Natachu, Tucson, Ariz. 
Mitchell, Alice Aff. 
Mrs. Alvan G. Smith 
2 Ridgefield Rd., Winchester, Mass. 



1927 
De Camp, Louise 

Mrs. Jerome H. Bishop, Jr. 

916 Union 111, Alameda, Calif. 
Faust, Ellen 

116 East 66th St., New York 21, N. Y. 
Fitch, Jane D. 

Mrs. Edwin J. Roland 

1429 44th St. N.W., Washington, D. C. 
French, Dorothy 

Mrs. Douglas M. Gray 

Old South Rd., Litchfield, Conn. 
Ireland, Marion Aff. 

Mrs. Augustine B. Conant, Jr. 

51 Middlesex Rd., Chestnut Hill 67, Mass. 
Lyman, Hannah Aff. 

Mrs. Roland Blenner-Hassett 

Sill Lane, R.F.D. 2, Old Lyme, Conn. 
White, Sydna 

Vineyard Haven, Mass. 

1928 
Hollis, Elizabeth 

Mrs. Edmund B. Sutton 

3615 No. Church St., Rockford, 111. 
Leavitt, Helen 

Mrs. Ernest B. Fisher, Jr. 

1149 N. Broad St., Galesburg, 111. 
Quin, Marion Aff. 

Mrs. Cyril M. Coggins 

% Maj. C. M. Coggins, PID, HQ USAREUR, 
APO 403, New York 
Ripley, Susan 

Mrs. Theodore E. Ward 

2885 Holly, Denver, Colo. 
Ross, Katherine 

Mrs. William F. Brooks 

5325 32nd St. N., Arlington 7, Va. 

1929 
Bowser, Elizabeth 

Mrs. Gordon M. Smith 

% Albright Art Gallery, Buffalo 22, N. Y. 
Copeland, Lucy 

Mrs. Addison Woodward 

911 Fairmount Ave., St. Paul 5, Minn. 
Gordon, Juliaette Aff. 

Mrs. William Forster 

6508 State Line Rd., Kansas City 13, Mo. 
Place, Cleone 

Mrs. Henry D. Tiffany, Jr. 

248 Salisbury St., Worcester, Mass. 
Warren, Hersilia Aff. 

Mrs. Howard B. Durbin 

Wedgeon Way, Anderson Ridge, Greenwich, 
Conn. 
Whitehill, Ruth Aff. 

Mrs. Gordon J. Wygant 

409 Park St., Upper Montclair, N. J. 

1930 
Hart, Margery Aff. 

Mrs. Chappell Cory 

66 Pleasant St., Somerset, Mass. 
Lord, Barbara 

Mrs. James F. Mathias 

Glendale Rd., Harrison, N. Y. 
Quimby, Jeanette 

Mrs. J. Grant Daly 

1226 Drew St., Clearwater, Fla. 



1931 
Bettels, Metta 

Mrs. Roland F. W. Smith 

34 Long View Rd., West Hartford, Conn. 
Carr, Nancy W. 

Mrs. James D. Holmes 

54 Pearl St., Bridgewater, Mass. 
Ireland, Catherine V. 

Mrs. George B. Lenz 

2802 N.E. 15th Terr., Fort Lauderdale, Fla. 
Olson, Mary Elizabeth Aff. 

Mrs. Calvin C. Crum 

% W. W. Crum, Swoope, Va. 
Phelps, Katharine Aff. 

Mrs. Nelson R. Richardson 

12 Bogle St., Weston 93, Mass. 
Prentice, Catherine Aff. 

Mrs. Catherine Prentice White 

Westview Station, Box 3222, Waco, Tex. 



Riemer, Jeanette R. Aff. 

Mrs. Jeanette R. O'Brien 
13-710 No. Gardenland, Bellflower, Calif. 
Scudder, Frances 

Mrs. Charles S. Glisson, Jr. 

941 Plymouth Rd., N.E., Atlanta 6, Ga. 

1932 
Dudley, Anne Aff. 

Mrs. Gray M. Blandy 

106 West 32, Austin 5, Tex. 
Harvey, Frances 

Mrs. W. C. Starkweather 

70 Brookside Rd., Darien, Conn. 
Hume, Jean 

Mrs. Philip E. Nelbach 

570 Skiff St., North Haven, Conn. 
Lawton, Virginia E. 

Mrs. LeRoy S. Wolfe, Jr. 

R.F.D. 2, Upper Albany St., Frankfort, N. Y. 
Lynde, Hilda 

Mrs. Donald P. Wylie 

1645 Harward, Washington, D. C. 
Macfadden, Beverly Aff. 

Mrs. Roland Hebert 

815 Levering Ave., Los Angeles 24, Calif. 
Mailey, Ruth 

Mrs. Donald D. Sutherland 

707 No. 1st St., Apt. 9, San Jose, Calif. 
Nicholls, Virginia Aff. 

Mrs. Fred DeAnguera 

2253 Edgebrook Dr., Rockford, 111. 

1933 
Beecroft, Margaret Aff. 

Mrs. Edward I. Pratt, Jr. 

2408 N. Military Rd., Arlington 7, Va. 
Burnham, Jane 

Mrs. Jerrold W. Curry 

Box 407, Centerville, Mass. 
Chapin, Virginia Aff. 

Mrs. Ronald C. Chalk 

40 E. Onwentsia Rd., Lake Forest, 111. 
Chapman, Lois 

Mrs. Walter Tarby 

436 Washington St., Wellesley Hills, Mass. 
Gaylord, Marcia 

Mrs. Edward d'Aubigny Norman 

Box 302, Stage Harbor Rd., Chatham, Mass. 
Tower, Mariatta 

22 McKinley Ave., West Caldwell, N. J. 
Walker, Maragert 

Mrs. Sidney B. Whittier 

Grapevine Cottage, Lexington Rd., Concord, 
Mass. 

1934 
Carlson, Ada 

Mrs. Philip T. Prescott 

Tabor Academy, Marion, Mass. 
Dean, Sarah R. 

Mrs. Eugene D. Farley 

7235 SW. Newton PI., Portland, Ore. 
Foss, Elizabeth Aff. 

Mrs. John M. Strachan 

813 Westcott Rd., Falls Church, Va. 
Hall, Delight 

Mrs. Tyge E. Rothe 

Box 749, Westport, Conn. 
Humphreys, Hope Aff. 

Mrs. Archer W. P. Trench 

Turtle Back Rd., New Canaan, Conn. 
Prest, Virginia Aff. 

Mrs. Samuel Lower y 

18 K St., West Concord, N. H. 
Rockwell, Mary E. 

Mrs. Robert D. Stewart 

22 Saunders Terr., Wellesley Hills, Mass. 

1935 
Abbot, Priscilla 

Mrs. Maurice A. Straub 

734 Sherwood Dr., Indianapolis, Ind. 
Gary, Helen E. 

Mrs. Helen C. May 

1019 Logan St., Denver, Colo. 
Clough, Elizabeth Aff. 

Mrs. Hugh Barndollar 

Bahama Apts., 251 Royal Palm Way, Palm 
Beach, Fla. 
Hamilton, Miriam Aff. 

Mrs. Arthur K. Berliner 

2312 San Jose Dr., Fort Worth 12, Tex. 



Harding, Phyllis 

Mrs. W. Hevwood Morton 

252 Bell Hill Rd., Wynnewood. Penna. 
Nunez, Lucia 

Mrs. Nunez Mason 
. 10801 Keswick St., Garrett Park, Md. 
Page, Virginia Aff. 

Mrs. Thomas R. Thorp 

816 Cornell Dr., Dayton 6, Ohio 
Scudder, Katharine 

Mrs. Alan W. Fraser 

U. S. Naval Hosp., Yokosuka, Japan, FPO San 
Francisco, Calif. 

1936 
Holland, Clara 

Mrs. Elwood N. Chase, 2nd 

VW-12, FPO San Francisco, Calif. 
Hopkins, Jane 

Mrs. P. Huber Hanes, Jr. 

1525 North Hawthorne Rd., Winston-Salem, 
N. C. 
Humphreys, Kathryn AIT. 

Mrs. John F. Requardt, Jr. 

Royal Oak, Md. 
Nourse, Virginia 

Mrs. Robert A. Salomon 

139 Rugbv Rd., Longmeadow, Mass. 
Pillsbury, Ann W. AfT. 

Mrs. Harrison Fehr, III 

38 La Noria, Orinda, Calif. 
Smith, Patricia 

Mrs. Leonard Magee 

Gingerhead Hill, Marblehead, Mass. 
Souther, Barbara Aff. 

Mrs. Frederick J. Cooke 

17 Cofe PI., London W 8, England 
Swan, Mary L. 

22 Thorndike St., Beverly, Mass. 
Wittig, Ruth 

Mrs. Louis A. Haynes 

1005 S.W. 13th St., Gainesville, Fla. 
Wright, Sylvia 

Mrs. William F. Poole, III 

301 Fremont Rd., North Tarrytown, N. Y. 

1937 
In man, Elizabeth 

Mrs. Robert F. Kirkpatrick 

9 Locke Lane, Lexington, Mass. 
Nevius, Jeanette Aff. 

96 Broad St., Flemington, N. J. 
Simpson. Ellen 

Mrs. John G. Martin, Jr. 

207 W. Main St., Mt. Kisco, N. Y. 

Walton, Anna Aff. 

Mrs. Henry Ernst, Jr. 

425 Alden Ave., W., Westfield, N. J. 

Williams, Marjorie 

Mrs. William G. Crothers 

526 Highland Ave., Westfield, N. J. 

Wonson, Judith Aff. 

Mrs. Allen Chamberlain 

222 Appelton St., Arlington 74, Mass. 



Loring, Linda Aff. 

Mrs. Homer Overly, Jr. 

% K. A. Loring, 2 Lime St., Boston, Mass. 
Owen, Calla \1T. 

Mrs. Donald E. Ross 

3111 Caroline, South Bend, Ind. 
Wilson, Betty Jean Aff. 

Mrs. Charles Galloway, Jr. 

Box 111, Rt. 4, Tucson, Ariz. 



1939 
Butler, Olive I. 

194 Summer St., Andover, Mass. 
Daniels, Eleanor Aff. 

Mrs. Oswald Tower, Jr. 

812 Pilgrim St., Birmingham, Mich. 
Hauser, Doris Aff. 

Mrs. Doris Williams 

39 Asbury Ave., Ocean City, N. J. 
Heidrich, Dorothy 

Mrs. Jesse C. Lockhart 

High Point Rd., Peoria, 111. 
Hill, Marjory 

Mrs. Croswell Bowen 

18 Spruce Lane, Chappaqua, N. Y. 
Hubbard, Joan 

Mrs. Charles J. Lawson, Jr. 

Kingwood Park, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 
Hume, Harriet F. Aff. 

Mrs. William E. Waters 

70 Central Ave., New Haven, Conn. 
Sawyer, Adelle 

Mrs. George W. Wood, III 

840 Broadway, Bangor, Maine 
Scanlan, Elizabeth 

Mrs. Roger I. Herrick 

Old Farm Rd., Wayland, Mass. 



1940 
Balcke, Eleanor L. 

Mrs. Harry C. Thompson 

Sylvan Rd. N., Westport, Conn. 
Bixby, Kathryn Aff. 

Mrs. James B. Likowski 

7762 Carroll Ave., Hayward, Calif. 
Chandler, Frances 

Mrs. William D. Futch 

120 Bay Point Dr., Snell Isle, St. Petersburg, Fla. 
Colley, Marcia 

Mrs. W. Curtis Melton, Jr. 

545 Bastogue, Akron, Ohio 
Littauer, M. Janet 

Mrs. Joseph M. Parriott 

Fairfield Ave., Westport, Conn. 
Spaulding. Mary V. 

Mrs. Boiling R. Powell, Jr. 

1616 32nd St., N.W., Washington, D. C. 
Williams, Priscilla 

Mrs. Alan L. Dorian 

804 Renel Rd., Plymouth Valley, Norristown, 
Penna. 
Wood, Muriel Aff. 

Mrs. Jack Winet 

Box 1105, Solvang, Calif. 



1938 

I Abbott, Constance 

Mrs. William H. Schwab 

1572 Clifton Park Rd., Schenectady, N. Y. 

I I Brown, Joan 

Mrs. Harold S. Small 

236 Walnut St., Brookline 46, Mass. 
I Coll, Marjorie 

Mrs. Lee Fields 

3306 44th St., Lubbock, Tex. 
I Comstock, Margaret 

Mrs. Roger W. Bavldon 

441 East 20th St., New York, N. Y. 
Davis, Sally B. Aff. 

Mrs. Thornton F. Bradshaw 

31 Bush Ave., Belle Haven, Greenwich, Conn. 
Godfrey, Mary-Frances 

Mrs. John C. Richardson 

3 Davis Ct., Durham, N. H. 
Hawkins, Elizabeth Aff. 

Mrs. Christopher Mav 

7997 Comp Group, APO 757, New York, N. Y. 
Hunter, Janice 

Mrs. Hugh G. J. Aitken 

3909 5th St., Riverside. Calif. 



1941 
Bondy, Ruth 

Mrs. Lawrence Lowy 

70 Chestnut Ave., Larchmont, N. Y. 
Eccles, Nancy 

Mrs. Reginald Roome, Jr. 

28 Columbus Ave., Northampton, Mass. 
Fiske, Dorothy 

Mrs. Ellsworth A. Winnette 

210 East Allegany Ave., Emporium, Penna. 
Hosford, Elizabeth Aff. 

Mrs. Carroll Wiggin 

R.F.D., Suncook, N. H. 
McCreery, Jessie 

Mrs. Philip M. Reed 

870 Georgia Ave., Winter Park, Fla. 
Moody, Verniece 

Mrs. Shields Bishop 

711 St. David's Lane, Schenectady, N. Y. 
Rafton, Eleanor 

Mrs. Harold N. Gordon 

24 Sevinor Rd., Marblehead, Mass. 
Stott, Helen 

Mrs. Chaloner P. Spencer 

Box 5, South Deerfield, Mass. 



Troub, Frances 

Mrs. Bertram H. Roberts 

44 Longlane Rd., West Hartford, Conn. 
Wilson, Bonney 

Mrs. Richard A. Hakanson 

4 Kenilworth Rd., Winchester, Mass. 
Woodman, Susan Aff. 

Mrs. Robert T. McSherry 

621 Braeburn Lane, Penn Valley, Narberth, 
Penna. 

1942 
Abbott, Irene 

Mrs. Kenneth P. MacPherson 

46 Rock Meadow Rd., Westwood, Mass. 
Bacon, Ann 

Mrs. John B. Reinheimer 

2116 Lincoln St., Evanston, 111. 
Bishop, Jane 

Mrs. John L. Fahey 

5032 Bradley Blvd., Apt. 2, Washington 15, D. C. 
Curran, Annette L. Aff. 

Mrs. Arthur J. Conlon, Jr. 

4 Monotony Rd., Arlington, Mass. 
Finneran, Mary Ellen 

133 East 35th St., New York 16, N. Y. 
Hill, Margaret 

Mrs. Harry Bell 

133 Linden Dr., Fair Haven, N. J. 
Johnson, Barbara W. 

Mrs. Curtis A. Prest 

Francestown, N. H. 
Lenane, Janice 

Mrs. Walter I. Scott, Jr. 

10 Orchard Circle, Wakefield, Mass. 
Leslie, Louise 

Mrs. Alfred J. Oxenham 

26 Moynihan Rd., South Hamilton, Mass. 
Sanders, Barbara 

Mrs. Wilton W. Dadmun 

67 Col. Hunt Dr., Abington, Mass. 
Shaw, Florence 

Mrs. Ronald F. Sickler 

% Nason, 16 Brookside Circle, Bronxville, N. Y. 
Taylor, Ann 

Mrs. Thomas M. Debevoise, 2nd 

55 E. 76th St., New York 21, N. Y. 
Wyatt, Lois Aff. 

Mrs. Donald Bramley 

18 Long Lane Rd., West Hartford, Conn. 

1943 
Beckman, Mary Alice 

Mrs. Peter Huidekoper 

Wahackme Rd., New Canaan, Conn. 
Bentley, Mary Elizabeth 

Mrs. Kenneth E. Spaulding, Jr. 

3623 N. Lafayette St., So. San Gabriel, Calif. 
Hall, Sylvia Aff. 

Mrs. Dudley T. Col ton, Jr. 

3538 Blocton Dr., Louisville, Ky. 
Holden, Joan 

Mrs. Joan H. Remy 

1127 St. Paul St., Baltimore, Md. 
Janssen, Margaret Aff. 

Mrs. Joseph R. Gray 

73 Summit Ave., Bronxville, N. Y. 
Kaufman, Barbara Aff. 

Mrs. Barbara Rosenwald 

1120 Park Ave., Apt. 18-B, New York, N. Y. 
Locke, Anne 

Mrs. Howard Hainan, Jr. 

P.O. Box 12, Hopkinton, N. H. 
O'Connell, Mary 

Mrs. Stoughton Bell, II 

3171-41st PI., Sandie Base, Albuquerque, N. M. 
Osborne, Polly 

Mrs. P. Dunlap Smith, Jr. 

10 Barner Lane, Mill Valley, Calif. 
Patterson, Jane Aff. 

Mrs. Albert Tilney, II 

295 Getzville Rd., Buffalo, N. Y. 
Peterson, Elizabeth 

20 Lime St., Boston 8, Mass. 
Pettengill, Patricia 

Mrs. John T. Whitaker 

2 Emery Lane, Mariemont, Cincinnati 27, Ohio 
Rowley, Elizabeth 

Mrs. Eugene C. Tittmann, Jr. 

20 Beach Dr., Darien, Conn. 
Shaughnessy, Katherine 

Mrs. David L. Bruns 

1976 California St., San Francisco, Calif. 



Teel, Cynthia Aff. 

Mrs. David J. Vail 

Florence Apts., Florence, Ala. 

1944 
Emerson, Nancy 

Mrs. Sheldon T. Viele 

47 Meadowbrook Rd., Williamsville 21, N. Y. 
Harrison, Shirley Aff. 

Mrs. Walter C. Emmett 

530 Torney St., Greensburg, Fenna. 
Paradise, Carol 

Mrs. Frederick H. Decker 

Laurelton House, R.D. 3, Princeton, N. J. 
Rhodes, Shirley 

Mrs. Robert W. Lowe 

Flora Rd., R.F.D. 2, Attleboro, Mass. 
Savage, Paula 

Mrs. John Williams 

9c Hogarth Rd., London S.W. 5, England 
Smith, Esther Davis Aff. 

Mrs. Edwin H. Mulford, 2nd 

Fox Hill Lane, Darien, Conn. 
Stone, Nancy 

Mrs. Paul F. Heymann 

2655 Talmadge Rd., Toledo 6, Ohio 

1945 
Ball, Barbara 

Mrs. Donald Bacon 

Ranfield Lane, Flint, Mich. 
Beecher, Barbara 

2065 Vallejo St., San Francisco 23, Calif. 
Boynton, Martha 

Mrs. Robert H. Pawle 

863 So. Race St., Denver 9, Colo. 
Brown, Elizabeth 

Mrs. Robert S. Gordon, Jr. 

3915 Prospect St., Kensington, Md. 
Bunten, Jean Aff. 

Mrs. Charles F. Kirby, Jr. 

9300 Parkhill Dr., Los Angeles, Calif. 
Dodge, Nancy 

Mrs. Frank R. Glazebrooks 

David Court, Woodbridge, Va. 
Doyle, Betty Aff. 

246 Harrison St., Passaic, N. J. 
Gage, Julia 

Mrs. John W. Moses 

540 W. Palm, Altadena, Calif. 
Leavitt, Sally Drew 

Mrs. Edward R. Cheney 

Saxton's River, Vt. 
Leland, Suzanne 

Mrs. John S. LeFeber 

1420 E. Bay Point Rd., Milwaukee 17, Wis. 
Livermore, June Aff. 

Mrs. June L. Reid 

38 Mellen St., Cambridge 38, Mass. 
Lurton, Grace 

325 East 41 St., New York, N. Y. 
Lyons, Andrea 

Mrs. Robert F. Shoemaker, Jr. 

Box 549 C, R.F.D. 2, McLean, Va. 
Mulford, Katharine S. 

2855 Pierce St., San Francisco, Calif. 
Mulvey, Jean 

Mrs. John C. Friedmann 

232 West 14th St., New York, N. Y. 
Twomey, Madge 

Mrs. George R. Keepin, Jr. 

1189-4th, Los Alamos, N. M. 
Walker, Edith Aff. 

Mrs. Francis B. Upham, 3rd 

5901 Cranston Rd., Washington, D. C. 

1946 
Fisher, Anne Aff. 

Mrs. Andrew L. Riker, III 

1600 E. La Rua, Pensacola, Fla. 
Gorham, Frances 

Mrs. Theordore Postma, Jr. 

330 Park, Kellogg, Idaho 
Greene, Gretchen Aff. 

55 East End Ave., New York 28, N. Y. 
Hill. Ann C. Aff. 

Mrs. Milbourne T. Gates 

1134 Fabrique, Wichita, Kan. 
Hogan, Patricia 

Mrs. Jean-Francois Haruduroy 

10 Rue Oswaldo-Cruz, Paris XVI, Fiance 



Peckett, Deborah Ml. 

Franconia, N. H. 
Kairdon, M. Phyllis 

Mrs. James M. Wilce 

1024 Coffey Court, St. Louis 19, Mo. 
Sommcr, Marjorie 

Mrs. John W. Tucker. Jr. 

740 Palmer Ave., Winter Park, Ma. 
Sullivan, Gail 

Mrs. William T. Fleming 

765 Valley St., Orange, N. J. 
Wcldon, Jane A. Aff. 

Mrs. John J. Boland 

18 Byron St., Bradford, Mass. 
Wright, Genevieve 

Mrs. Harry W. James 

2613 Nela Ave., Pine Castle Br., Orlando, Fla. 

1947 
Aulis, Ann 

Mrs. Thomas J. Ronan, Jr. 
16 Mattawanakee Trail, Littleton, Mass. 
Barnard, Nancy 

Mrs. Lawrence C. Soule, Jr. 
48 Central St., Andover, Mass. 
Brown, E. Jane 

Mrs. John M. Reynolds 
11 North Flaxton PI., Alexandria, Va. 
Chandler, M. Anne 

Mrs. Theodore N. Anthony 
147-17 Charter Rd. A., Jamaica 35, N. Y. 
Chivers, Lucy 

Mrs. Ezra L. Bixby 

2633 Pennington Rd., Pennington, N. J. 
Cole, Janice H. 

6 Cheever Circle, Andover, Mass. 
Dimmitt, Nancy Jean Aff. 
Mrs. William M. Hawes 

Biarritz Apt. Hotel, 121 Ward Pkwy., Kansas 
City, Mo. 
Dowd, Helen 

Mrs. Gilbert B. Richards 
3325 Burnet Ave., Cincinnati 29, Ohio 
Emerv, Mary 

Mrs. Richard B. Barnhill 
2311 Conn. Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 
Eason, Virginia 

Mrs. John Weinmann 
303 Audubon St., New Orleans 18, La. 
Flowers, Ann Aff. 
Mrs. Philip G. Howlett 
706 Greenleaf Ave., Wilmette, 111. 
Gierasch, Emily 

Mrs. John M. Savage 
69 Orris St., Melrose 76, Mass. 
Goddard, Barbara 
Mrs. Peter P. Theg 
WMTV, Madison, Wis. 
Gould, Diane 

Mrs. Norborne Berkeley, Jr. 
Brushy Ridge Rd., New Canaan, Conn. 
Hanly, Corallie 

1415 Cloncurry Rd., Norfolk, Va. 
Karelitz, Joan 

Mrs. Norman Bnsson 
583 Main St., Haverhill, Mass. 
Kimball, Margaret 

Mrs. Robert L. Montgomery, Jr. 
44 Westland St., Belmont 78, Mass. 
Kolins, Joy 

Mrs. Daniel Peisch 
1 Main St., Norwich, Vt. 
Lyford, Sylvia 

Mrs. Richard B. Morgan 
147 Glenwood Ave., New London, Conn. 
Mclvor, Janet 

Mrs. Harald Bromley 
171 East 81st St., New York, N. Y. 
McLean, Carolyn 
Mrs. Robert E. Bly 
1819 G St., Iowa City, Iowa 
Meyer, Margot 

Mrs. Harrv E. Richter 

Codies Manor Apts., 58 Codies Ave., Poughkeep- 
sie, N. Y. 
Miller, Mary Louise Aff. 
Mrs. Reeves W. Hart, Jr. 
R.R. 1, Box 268 A, Crown Point, Ind. 
Peck, Mary Lee 

Mrs. Basil F. Latrobe-Bateman 

5516 Carolina PL, N.W., Washington, D. C. 



Bobbins, Susanne 

Mrs. Bradford C. dc\\ oil 
Box 250. Rt. 1. Vienna, Va. 
Rodgi rs. Patricia ML 

l forest PI., Glendale, Ohio 
Savage, Maud 

Apt. 3A, 101 Perry St., New \ ork 14, N. Y. 
Sackett, Carolyn 

Mrs. Kenneth M. Coleburn, Jr. 
Fullerton PL, Allendale Dr., Rye, \. V. 
SchaeflVr. Cornelia Aff. 

983 Park Ave., New York 28, \. \ . 
Scripture, Nancy 

Mrs. Frederick Garrison 
20 Glendale Rd., Wellesley, Mass. 
Scars, Harriet Aff. 

Dana Hall Junior, Eastman Circle, Wellesley, 
Mass. 

1948 
Barrell, Katherine Aff. 
Mrs. John F. Shepard 
45 School St., Andover, Mass. 
Bergh, Anne 

Mrs. Norman A. Hull-Ryde 
\d\lYi New Hope Rd., Gastoma, N. C 
Booth, Dorothy Lee 
Mrs. George O. Witwer 
98 Hart Axre Rd., Southampton, Conn. 
Davis, Sue 

Mrs. John A. Snyder 
33 Maplewood Rd., Hartsdale, N. V. 
Delong, Grace 

Mrs. Richard C. Einsel 

222 Genesee St., Apt. 5. Rochester 11. N. Y. 
Farrar, Mary E. 

4 Meyersville Rd., Green Village, N.J. 
Frank, A. Fairfield 
Mrs. Arthur L. DuBois 
860 Lakeshore Dr., Apt. 21 K, Chicago. 111. 
Grimshaw, Martha 
Mrs. Arthur C. Bivens 
26 D. Felton Rd., Key West, Fla. 
Hellier, Helen Louise 
Mrs. Anthonv P. Louvis 
15 Eaton St., Boston 14, Mass. 
Jones, Rosemary 

116 High Rd., Kensington, Conn. 
McConnel, Elizabeth 

Mrs. Robert F. Barnett, Jr. 
1701 South Tremont St., Oceanside. Caht. 
MacManus, Josephine 
Mrs. William A. Woods 
3216 East Missouri Ave.. Phoenix, Ariz. 
Marton, Mary 

Mrs. Jack B. Davenport 

8724 Second Ave., S., Minneapolis 20, Minn. 
Rich, Mary 

Mrs. Thomas H. Ohlweiler, Jr. 
930 Madison Ave., Plainfield. N. J. 
Richmond, Hannah 
Mrs. Harold Hammer 
36 East 36 St., New York 16, N. Y. 
Sarolea, Ann 

Mrs. Ahck N. Bartholomew 

Caversham House, East Putney, London, Eng- 
land 
Selden, Mackay 

Mrs. Robert H. Bush 
95 Vayo St., Rochester 9, N. Y. 
Sugar, Barbara 

Mrs. James H. Connor 
936 Chelsea Ave., Columbus 9, Ohio 
Tasche, Helen 

Mrs. C. J. North, Jr. 

240 Woodside Dr., Hewlett, L. I., N. Y. 

1949 
Appell, Helen 

Mrs. Walter M. Norton 

South Harpswell, Me. 
Banks, Honor 

Mrs. Malcolm O. MacLean 

168 Hewlett Neck Rd., Woodmere, L. I., N. Y. 
Barnes. Mercy 

Warren Ave., Plymouth, Mass. 
Dow, Barbara 

Mrs. Donald C. Freeman 

14 Bowdoin St., Cambridge, Mass. 
Johnson, Faith 

Mrs. Henry S. Beard 

9 King St., Westfield, Mass. 



Nesbitt, Katherine A. 

Mrs. Fred D. Reese, Jr. 

Box 25, Ridgetown, Ontario, Canada 
Scott, Judith 

Mrs. John M. Scott 

2003 Vendome Ave., Montreal, Quebec, Canada 
Smith, Shirley O. Aff. 

Mrs. Robert E. Anderson 

12 Colorado PI., Fawn Hills, Huntington, L. I., 
N. Y. 
Stevens, Anne 

Mrs. George R. Bailey, Jr. 

405 East 14th St., New York 9, N. Y. 

1950 
Aldrich, Joan 

321 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 
Anson, Jill Aff. 

149 Brattle St., Cambridge, Mass. 
Atwood, Cynthia Aff. 

Mrs. Norman W. Couch 

1044 Hazel St., Birmingham, Mich. 
Baldwin, Barbara 

Mrs. Mark W. Potter 

Weekeepeemee Rd., Woodbury, Conn. 
Bowman, Dorothy 

Mrs. James A. Crawford 

58 Lawrence Dr., North White Plains, N. Y. 
Bradley, Elizabeth 

Mrs. Charles J. Hubbard 

1586 Cambridge St., Cambridge 38, Mass. 
Carter, Alison 

Mrs. John G. Mitchell 

118 Hollingsworth Rd., Osterville, Mass. 
Davis, Georgette 

Mrs. Geovanni Ferrante 

Dugway Proving Grounds, Box 387, Dugway, 
Utah 
Evans, Julia Aff. 

15 Stonehouse Rd., Scarsdale, N. Y. 
Faigle, Cynthia 

Mrs. Paul J. Quinn, Jr. 

888 Winvah Ave., Westfield, N. J. 
Gafill, Jane R. 

Mrs. Reginald F. Towner, Jr. 

340 Upper Montclair Ave., Upper Montclair, 
N.J. 
Gibbon, Roberta 

Mrs. Neligh Coates, Jr. 

5328 Falmouth, Kansas City 3, Kan. 
Goodspeed, Elizabeth 

Mrs. Francis D. Fellner 

36 Cobbs Rd., West Hartford, Conn. 
Griffin, Joyce 

Mrs. Richard B. Kurz 

437 Claranna Ave., Apt. 4, Dayton 9, Ohio 
Huberth, Coralie 

Mrs. Samuel Sloan 

Baptist Church Rd., Yorktown Heights, N. Y. 
Lindamood, Ann 

Mrs. Robert H. Twyford 

Brownsdale Farm, Rt. 1, Box 49, Havre de Grace, 
Md. 
Merri wether, V. Ann 

Mrs. Leslie B. Disharoon 

302 N. Allen Ave., Richmond 20, Va. 
Moser, Ann 

3003 Bay St., Redwood City, Calif. 
Russell, Jane 

Mrs. Christopher G. Stoneman 

1010 Westland Rd., Charlottesville, Va. 
Shulze, Nancy 

Mrs. Elliott S. Lamb 

32 Force PL, Mt. Tabor, N. J. 
Sontum, Eva 

1 Primus Ave., Boston, Mass. 

1951 
Bissell, Anne 

Mrs. Theodore A. Gates, Jr. 

1807 Fox St., Hyattsville, Md. 
Chaplin, Ellen 

Mrs. Mahmoud H. Sabet 

Crossway Apartments, Kingston, R. I. 
Col burn, Dorothy 

Mrs. David Rice 

Hey wood Rd., Arden, N. C. 
Dower, Sally 

Mrs. Jack Saglio 

48 E. Newton St., Boston, Mass. 



Emmert, Alice 

602 E. Larkin St., Midland, Mich. 
Emmons, Abbie 

Mrs. Donald W. Penfield 

328 Dempster St., Evanston, 111. 
Finger, Sylvia 

International Standard Brands, Inc., 585 Madi- 
son Ave., New York 22, N. Y. 
Furst, Carolin 

Colonial Hotel, Smethport, Penna. 
Gibson, Barbara 

Mrs. Roy W. Roth 

% Mrs. Leah Lane, Vineyard Lane, Stamford, 
Conn. 
Holden, Paula 

82 B Oxford St., Cambridge, Mass. 
Hummel, Carolyn 

8 Rochelle Rd., Larchmont, N. Y. 
Massie, Dorothy 

123 Waverly PI., Apt. B, New York, N. Y. 
Randall, R. Doane 

Mrs. John Motsinger, Jr. 

1405 Ebert St., Winston-Salem, N. C 
Russell, Frances 

Mrs. George L. Phelps 

58 West Beacon St., West Hartford, Conn. 
Slysz, Marianne 

New York Hospital, 1320 York Ave., New York 
21, N. Y. 
Smith, Jo Anne 

Mrs. Theodore Sanders 

69 Union St., Burlington, Vt. 
Smith, Sandra 

Mrs. Leonard V. Short, Jr. 

4 Ayr Rd., Brighton, Mass. 
Teasdale, Merilyn 

Mrs. Charles L. Abbott 

Union St., East Bridgewater, Mass. 
Warner, Martha 

Mrs. Daniel C. Olson, Jr. 

3804J^ B-Ward Blvd., Pensacola, Fla. 
White, Fay E. 

8 Park Ave., Jackson, Miss. 

1952 
Allen, Anisia 

121 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 
Emerson, Cynthia 

7 Apache Trail, Arlington, Mass. 
Lyons, Ann 

331 West 71st St., New York 23, N. Y. 
Penwell, Nancy 

Mrs. William O. Hood 

95 Elm St., Andover, Mass. 
Smith, Sandra 

1226 Massachusetts Ave., Arlington Heights, 
Mass. 

1953 
Audi, Elaine K. 

7 Monroe PI., Brooklyn Heights, N. Y. 
Burton, B. Carol 

Cornell School of Nursing, 1320 York Ave., New 
York 21, N. Y. 
Gomez, Catalina 

Carrera 12 No. 11-64, Bogota, Colombia, S. A. 

1954 
Davis, Audrey 

Mrs. Edward R. Trowbridge, III 
434 Brook St., Providence, R. I. 
Emery, Patricia 

Mrs. Warren Wolfe 

2313 Derbeyshire Ave., Lakeland, Fla. 

Huckins, Deborah 

96 Grove St., Peterborough, N. H. 

Larter, Suzanne 

Mary Hitchcock School of Nursing, Hanover. 
N. H. 

Munro, Jane S. 

Mrs. Charles W. Barrett, Jr. 

38 Sachem Village, Hanover, N. H. 

Stain ton, Patricia Aff. 

Mrs. Dale F. Rowe 

Cherry Lawn, Darien, Conn. 

Straw, Pollie Aff. 

270 North Bay St., Manchester, N. H. 






WfELLS BINDERY INC. 
ALTHAM, MASS. 
DEC. 1956